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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/11/20 in all areas

  1. So, I was a teen newbie bass player in the 80’s. Like many a young bassist of the era, I played a Westone at some point - a Thunder 1A in my case. Always had fond memories, so when this Thunder 3 came up for sale locally, I just had to have it. It was in a sorry state (it is 35 years old) - grimy fretboard, broken off screw on the battery cover & worst of all, & no sound from the front pick up, but I could see potential. I was told it had been in a case for most of its life & judging by the minimal fret wear, I can believe that. With a bit of elbow grease from me, the skills of my local guitar shop (Kempsters), & Armstrong pickups, it is now fully functioning and a most welcome addition to my little collection. Sounds epic through modern amplification and the neck is a joy - low action & perfectly set frets make it a breeze to play. Yes, first fret feels a reach & it is weighty at 10.3lbs, but overall it’s superb. Very happy.
    19 points
  2. So i'm deciding to sell a bass or two, I tend to use my EUB, Status and Jazz basses so this one is not getting the usage it deserves! I purchased this bass 6 years ago from this site. It has played 2 festivals and been recorded on 1 album in my hands so truth be known it's had minimal use. I'd like to think that is reflected in it's condition which barring a small ding that it came with is excellent. The finish is stunning, plays a dream and it sounds superb. It comes with SKB Fender hard case. I'm based in Northumberland, given the pandemic situation at the moment try outs are tricky. I could give a link to the album....no plug intended believe me! guess there is the option of Zoom to have a listen. . Unfortunately I don't have any scales to weigh the bass, If I can find some I will do that. Not looking for trades. I've never posted a bass before but i'm sure this could be arranged at buyers expense and risk but only within the UK. UPDATE. Royal Mail can do around about £30-00 special delivery guaranteed next day fully insured. Signed for. I'll leave a little bit of spec. Thanks for looking and do take care. Cheers. Simon. Precision Bass Ash body Hand-rubbed stain/satin lacquer top coat finish Modern "C" shape maple neck with rosewood fingerboard 20 Medium jumbo frets Satin finish on back, gloss finish on front Posiflex graphite neck support rods S/S pickup configuration American Standard Precision Bass single split coil pickup Master Volume and Master Tone controls Chrome hardware HMV, High Mass Vintage bridge (Strings-Thru-Body or Topload) Nut width 41/42 mm. (41.3)?
    11 points
  3. Hi All, So thought I'd update you on what happened. DHL couldn't find the bass, it was last seen on CCTV in the wearhouse the day before the last scan, then it went missing. It's possibly it was damaged and "disposed of without being properly recorded", or that it went out on with an agency driver who couldn't find our address and then it got lost in the system. They aren't sure and it may resurface in an auction as some of you have suggested. There was 1 new purple burst available in the UK at Anderson's, and my email to the CEO resulted in personal contact from the head of Customer Services, who agreed as a gesture of goodwill to compensate Ollie for the extra so he could get that one. They were very helpful, even reserving the bass for us so it couldn't be sold while they investigated. So I have a very happy 13 year old who has a brand new bass rather than a used one, and I'm actually quite envious - it's a really nice bass!! Do I think this would have happened without directly emailing the CEO? Probably not given that I also emailed Customer Services independently incase the CEO didn't get my email and I eventually got a reply telling me it would be redelivered the following day, a week after I already knew they had lost it 😆 I probably wouldn't have bothered the CEO if it was just for me, I'd have just taken the PayPal refund and been cross, but I'm glad I took a stand for Ollie as he'd worked so hard and waited so long to get one. He's busy slapping some RHCP's as I write this, so was well worth it! Aside from this I also had 2 very kind offers for free basses for him, one on here and one on FB, and that also put my faith back in humanity and the bass community! All in all a very happy end to this tale. Thanks for all your input and suggestions!
    7 points
  4. Don't know if it qualifies with your definition, and it happens more on other instruments than bass.......... but it's when people leave a clip-on tuner on the headstock during a performance.
    6 points
  5. Sorry again.... But any excuse to show off my Thunder II v3, with optional xlr and never seen again claret (ish) sparkle finish. Thank you Musical Exchanges in about 1990 for trading my Encore P. This was my only bass til about 2010 it was that good... Should have kept it at that coz now I have 10!
    6 points
  6. 4 points
  7. Irritated, no, but mildly amused at all the (to me...) niggly little things that make no difference (except, maybe, to the price...) of stuff, basses included. It has strings..? Check. It's in tune..? Check. Strap-locks secure..? Check. Rock on..! Most of these things I wouldn't even notice if they were pointed out to me..! I don't think I'm alone, either.
    4 points
  8. Reluctantly selling my American G&L 2000. Fantastic bass. Has the #12 neck, like a modern P, which feels perfect to me. (I've had Tributes in the past and always found them to be a bit too chunky). Great range of tones, but if you know about the L2000 then you know that already. Bass is in excellent condition - rarely gigged and only very light surface scratches below the strings. No buckle marks on the back. Finish is like glass! Only changes from stock are the addition of Dunlop strap locks and I had to have the nut replaced. (I popped it when I put nylon tapewounds on it). It now has a nut installed by Chris McIntyre (have a look at his basses online if you haven't already. Stunning. I have one). Not too sure what he uses - something and aluminium - but it's what he normally puts on his own basses, so no problem with quality. Strung with Cobalt flats at the moment. Comes with the original case (it's a tiny bit scuffed in places, but almost ever used) plus certificate / spec sheet etc. This is a great price for a classic, premium (and hugely underrated) USA made bass. I'll be sorry to see it go as I love the feel of it - neck and body shape, and it balances perfectly on a strap - but I only seem to be using my P basses these days so someone should get to play it. In Edinburgh, pickup ideal, but can ship at cost.
    4 points
  9. Wodja mean, frivolity..? I'll have you know that this is a very serious concern being run, here. Here's the Certificate... Lurkslittle's Favourite Number Challenge.pdf ... which looks like this (but bigger, of course...). Enjoy.
    4 points
  10. For sale (or trade) my Cort GB75 in trans black. I bought this recently from a stand up bloke here on basschat. Unfortunately I didn't do my research very well as its a 35" scale and has a wider string spacing than I can get along with. This is a real disappointment for me as it is easily one of the best basses I've ever played. The bass is superbly built and plays beautifully. I know there is a lot of praise for Cort basses but I didn't think it'd be as good as it is. High spec hardware with a huge Omega bridge and Hipshot tuners, swamp ash body and a flamed maple fretboard make the price point hard to believe.The bridge allows for some string spacing adjustment but is happiest at 19mm. Tones come from a Musicman, and a single jazz pickup coupled with an active/passive 2 band eq. Weighs in at 10lbs. I am open to trade possibilities but a sale gives me more freedom to look around. Any questions fire away. UK postage included. Cheers Craig.
    4 points
  11. Smx 1020 by VTypeV4, on Flickr Overview: As the decade of the yuppy, Boy George, questionable fashion styles and many other cliches associated with the 1980s was coming to a close, Trace Elliot were riding on the wave of their success of their (then) highly sophisticated and high powered range of bass amplifiers. Noted for their unique sound and unmistakable aesthetics which included a large graphic EQ, green facia paint and a glowing UV strip, Trace amps were seen behind many of the great players of the time. The then current 'Series 6' range introduced in around '88 was still hip, modern and built on the reputation of the previous 'Mark V' series with a notable extension of the 11-band range now up to twelve which were coupled to improved and more powerful (up to 600w) solid state output stages. There was also a range of valve amplifiers with brushed steel panels which had modified versions of the GP7 and GP12 pre-amplifiers and multi-tube output stages up to 380w which were known as the 'Twin Valve', 'Quattra Valve' and 'Hexa Valve' models. These were developed from the equally sought after VA models - high times, indeed. As an ever innovative company, Trace Elliot had not stood still and continued developing their latest range of bass rigs which appeared on the market in around '93. Both 7 and 12-band models had additional features (such as EQ balance, compression and valve stages) and improvements over the previous Series 6 versions. The new range designed by Clive Button was to be known as the 'Sound Management' series with the pre-amp stages now known as the GP7-SM and GP12-SMX respectively. The SM models had an update in '97 (around the time of the Gibson purchase) to become the SMC range now with a simplified dual band compressor whilst SMX models would almost last until the end of the millennium virtually unchanged and to many, represent the very pinnacle of Trace Elliot amplification. Sadly, after 2000, production was being wound off by the bosses at Gibson and the replacement GP12X never saw the same success as its predecessor. Problems in terms of reliability and build quality also became apparent which did little aid the reputation of theses models and by 2002, production had stopped. Fast forward to 2005 and the brand was now owned by Peavey who had developed new 'Trace Elliot' amplifiers built at Peavey UK in Corby and later in the US. These only saw moderate success due to their own reliability problems, the rather steep price tags and weight - the dawn of the lightweight amp was upon us. Today, the Trace Elliot brand still exists and the ELF is one of the smallest, lightest amplifiers on the market and according to many online reviews is solid, reliable and capable of holding it's own at gigs although the question of whether it truly sounds like the amps of old is still somewhat divisive. I can't comment as I've not tried one yet - I've only ever seen one example in the real world. Smx art biyang by VTypeV4, on Flickr Features: The SMX has an array of knobs, sliders and buttons across the front panel which on initial inspection seem a little cluttered and complex. A closer second look will make more sense of things with each stage having it's own section. Initial input on the far left has a single jack socket with an active / passive switch plus there's the usual input gain knob although the input level is metered by a 'traffic light' system for optimum gain. Allied to this, there's a blend control for both transistor and valve stages, each giving a different 'flavour' or a balance of both. Next are the tonal adjustments with two switchable pre-shapes and the switchable 12-band graphic EQ with an independent level control - the status of both are indicated with LEDs next to each switch. Towards the right, there's the 'Sound management' section which, at it's centre has the EQ balance and this acts as a highpass / lowpass filter when turned clockwise / anti clockwise respectively. Flanked either side of the balance control are separate controls for the low band (left) and high band (right) compressors each of which has a different envelope suited for each frequency band. The knobs act as a threshold (and possibly a subtle increase in ratio - difficult to say) control with maximum compression obtained with the controls fully clockwise. Finally, on the far left, an output level adjusts playing volume and unbalanced line out connection levels, a standy switch works as a handy mute / tune plus there's an effects level blend for the FX loop. As a bonus on the non-rackmount 400w and 600w models, a UV strip light illuminates the control panel so even on effectively black stages, the status of all controls are easily seen. The rear panel is different on each version. AH300-SMX: 250 / 300w model is a compact 2u chassis and only has a single DI out (XLR) and a single, mono FX loop. Early 250 models came with a convection-cooled output stage but later 280w 'Bi-Polar Bear' stages were fan cooled. Very late models were fitted with the 320w Clive Button output board after reliability problems became an issue. AH400-SMX: 350 / 400w model is a larger 3u chassis, has two FX loops (one parallel, stereo and high passed; the other series, mono and full range), 3 DI out (two post EQ, one pre) plus a dual mono line out. I can't find any reference regarding differences between the 350w and 400w versions other than their cosmetics. AH600-SMX: 300w + 300w with the rest as above but with additional switching for mono full range, stereo full range or bi-amp operation plus an adjustable crossover with level controls on each power amplifier section. These were unchanged other than cosmetically. Stand alone SMX pre-amp: As AH400-SMX but in smaller 2u chassis with adjustable crossover and high pass / low pass line outputs. Specification: AH400-SMX Hybrid pre-amp & SS output stage 400w at 4 ohm, 300w at 8 ohm Traditional class A/B topology - heavy iron and big capacitors 12-band graphic equalizer Switchable pre-shaped EQ curves Active & passive input Master volume Dual band compressor Series and parallel effects loops Pre and post EQ direct outputs (XLR) Post master volume line outs (Jack) All references forward from here will be specific to the 400SMX. Smx art biyang by VTypeV4, on Flickr Sound Quality: The baked in Trace Elliot sound isn't suited to all tastes, generes and sonic spaces - pre-shape one (general scoop centered at 400hz with slight boosts at 50hz and 2K5) is very '80s and quite harsh - number two is similar but less extreme. This is the usual association with these amps however, they are far more than a one-trick pony - the graphic EQ can be switched in to make some far more useful and real world sounds. Personally I use a combination of shape one and further adjust the sound with graphic for a smooth, more modern sound. With such an array of options and combination, I expect pretty much any sound could be coaxed from punk and rock through to jazz and funk - I've never struggled to get a sound I like. The only potential downfall that could be leveled at the SMX is the lack of overdrive facility but that's not what these amps are about - powerful, clean and loud is where it's at - much like the SWR range albeit a different character. I'm sure a Sansamp before the amp could easily dirt things up if that was your thing. Now to the jewel in the crown of the SMX; that dual band compressor. In studios, multi-band compression is common place and can be very useful in shaping a sound whether that be individual channels as part of a mix or a piece in the puzzle of mastering but is rarely seen on instrument amplification. Trace Elliot saw it fit do adorn the SMX with a dual band compressor so frequencies below 250hz will be treated differently than those above. Judging by ear (so this might be less than absolute fact) the low band has a slow (ish) attack and release and a soft knee which adds a 'solid' feel to each note. Note definition is helped and it gives you something to 'lean' against when digging in. The high-band feels to be a much faster envelope so personally, I use only a little of this as too much seems to kill the note and it starts feel like the dynamics have been all but ironed out. Whilst I'm used to comprehensive compressors, the simple two-knob design of the SMX works just as well in both live and studio situations - I feel like a lot of adjustments and tweaking were done at the design stage to get it right. Given how flexible and tweakable the pre-amp is, it's very difficult to define but in terms of quality, it sounds great . I feel the Trace Elliot with it's extensive options will either help you shine and get you exactly where you want to go or it will hang you out to dry. To get the best out of it, knowing your frequencies and how they sonically 'fit' on the graphic EQ is a massive help plus listening and feeling for the appropriate levels of compression is also key - I always compare EQ and compression to booze; some can be good so more might be better unless it becomes too much - it can be a tricky balance sometimes. Taking the time and really getting to know it is the solution as they aren't really a 'plug and play' amplifier. The single 400 watt output stage is very capable and definitely worthy of it's rating - at the time of writing, amplifiers of three times the claimed power are common place - many which weigh half (or less!) than the old Trace. Personally, I've never needed it 'full tilt' and at rehearsal it barely sits above idle. Despite it's 'modest' rating, make no mistake, this thing is 'proper', capable of rolling with the loudest of situations and finding the limits of most speaker enclosures! Smx art biyang by VTypeV4, on Flickr Build quality and reliability: In terms of build, I can't really criticize it on any level. On the outside, the green 'rat furr' (as many call it?) is bobble free and accurately upholstered, the riveted stainless steel corners are precisely fitted and the flip handles are highly over-spec'd. Looking to the front control panel, the black and bright green contrast each other very well with the writing having a very clean and defined edge - even with the UV light off. All the sliders, control knobs, switches and sockets have a 'solid feel' with just the right amount of damping to feel neither cheap or stiff. On the inside, the story is much the same, most notably the power supply and caps. The transformer is a huge torroidal type which is no doubt where a good percentage of the amplifiers' weight lies - I've seen smaller in higher rated pro spec power amplifiers. Nestled between the transformer and the output board are the two equally over specified filter capacitors. A large (not too noisy, thankfully) fan is mounted on the left side in the centre to cool the internals. It's fair to say Trace Elliot went 'belt and braces' with the supply and output stage of these amps as they're far more impressive looking than their smaller 280w stable mates despite only a moderate claimed power difference. Looking elsewhere inside sees thick, good quality PCBs with a few smaller individual boards accompanying the main three, reasonably tidy wiring all housed in a thick steel chassis. No complaints here. To be clear, this is the second 400SMX I've owned - I foolishly sold the last one in 2006. I've never had an ounce of bother with either example (or indeed the 600 I owned for a while) not even so much as a fuse. 100% trouble free. Unlike the all-valve amplifiers that I own, the SMX doesn't have any quirks or oddities (they all do that, sir!) and whilst this arguably strips it of a degree character, it goes hand in hand with it's truly professional design. This particular example was made in 1998 and have little doubt saying it works just as well today as it did when it came out of the factory. Other observations: It's very difficult for me to accept that production of these things ceased more than twenty years ago - they were the pinnacle of design and something that 15 year old me aspired to one day own along with a Warwick bass. As mentioned on this forum - often at great length, many times over - the world has since moved on and modern amplifiers are now smaller, weigh less; are more capable than ever plus their accompanying speaker cabinets are made from lighter woods plus the drivers contained within can play louder and lower with less distortion than those of even 10 years ago. Mauling 120 Kg worth of heavyweights is now optional! Whilst we're talking of weight, the big SMX weighs something in the region of 24 Kg (we're into valve amp territory here) which is just out of the question for those suffering with frailty or other physical ailments - a modern day ELF weighs less than one kilogram and even something like a Genz Benz Streamliner 900 weighs less than 4 Kilos. Despite of all that weight and physical bulk, the performance is unquestionable and is still more than capable of holding it's own against anything modern (once you've EQ'd the '80s out!) - irrespective of claimed power. Smx art biyang by VTypeV4, on Flickr
    3 points
  12. Hi, for sale a great bass lots of diferent tones really special bass sadly 2nd lockdown is comming and my band is not playing at all. some small dings on the body see the pictures specs alder body seafoam green nitro finish quartersawn maple neck macassar ebony fingerboard 24 frets pickups and hardware and everything on this bass are home grow comes with a good quality skb case. cheers alexis
    3 points
  13. I've built a few different short scale basses now at various scale lengths 23" (headless), 27", 29" and 30" and I'm still enjoying tinkering with these!! I'm particularly enjoying playing the 27" basses so much so I'm building a 27" 5 string at the moment (on another thread). I ordered a generic neck blank and the one that arrived was quite wide, wide enough to have sufficient spare for a headless neck.... So, I'm going to make a 27.5" neck for one of the mini headless basses just to see what that is like. I'm hoping to be able to use normal short scale strings on that to achieve the right tension etc. - might work, might not!! The reason for it being 27.5"? Well, that is the scale length of a spare slotted fretboard I have, leftover as the result of an error with my measurements from a previous build...!!! I've also made a neck blank for a 17" scale neck as another possibility - that would be tuned an octave up (@ped's fault again with his picture thread of really short basses). I've got a bit more to look at with that to see how the pocket tapers with it being much shorter (i don't want to modify the body). This is the neck blank for the 5 string neck - it really is quite wide!! Next to the ruler, I've got some other laminated offcuts that will form the centre section of the neck. The shorter piece is the blank for the 17" neck made from offcuts from other necks The two necks from the one neck blank with their corresponding fretboards Note sure what the result of this will be but only one way to find out!!
    3 points
  14. OK Here we go , it is time to get your creative juices bubbling with the inspiration of the following picture chosen by the winner of "Lurksaliitles' Favourite Number Challenge" , which was of course @upside downer , though due credit being due to his co-winners of the composition challenge last month of @Dad3353 and @xgsjx Usual rules apply. You know the drill: ✔️ Entries must be <5 minutes and written/recorded this month. ❌ No illegal samples, copyright infringements or other snide goings-on ❌ Bagpipes. Never. Also on thin ice with panpipes, to be perfectly honest. ❌ No voting for your own entry. We'll know. And we'll shame you. Deadline for entries is midnight on Monday 23rd November DIVE IN
    3 points
  15. My wife is not really into this sort of music but EVEN SHE looked up from her samsung conversation vortex and said.. "ooh she's excellent isn't she", while i watched Esperanza Spalding live dvd. Debora never usually says anything about the music I listen to. never..... ever!. Its very old this but her electric/acoustic bass playing and singing is really something special. imo. Even my soft rock pop balad loving wife thought so.!! 😆
    3 points
  16. Cheat notes help when I'm going from playing along with a recording to playing with a band. I will often write down something like: Intro D G C x4 Verse D A D A x2 Em D A Em Chorus A Bm A Bm C# x4 So it's not tabbing out a riff or whatever but it sets out the structure of the song for me so I don't get lost without the cues the original recording has and if I forget the exact riff at least I can play around the chord. Then after I've played it enough I don't use the notes any more.
    3 points
  17. I'd say knowing the chords helps a lot. Akin to doing the edges of a puzzle first to get the basic structure. Then you can understand the style and feel of the recorded player as they 'work around' the chord structure.
    3 points
  18. The embossed numbers on the knobs of my starfire bass only go up to nine. That just doesn't seem right as its 'one less'
    3 points
  19. I expect this is fairly common - I don't read and never really got on with tab. I listen to the song several times without going anywhere near my bass, just to pick up the structure. Then I dissect it with the bass and figure out out to play it on the neck - best positions etc. Then I just listen to the song as much as possible, over and over again, imagining how I play each note as the song plays out. I haven't found any shortcuts, just keep listening.
    3 points
  20. So it looks like social media is going to become a wash with split screen videos again. I’ll kick it off...
    3 points
  21. Recently I have been mining the rich vein of golden oldies on the Beat Club back catalogue. Stumbled on this, Chas Hodges keeping up with Albert Lee!
    3 points
  22. Bought some strings ages ago from Mr Murray, and this came with them, which was very nice of him.
    3 points
  23. I think the whole 'it's for my son' thing is a cover up!
    3 points
  24. Definitely Mick Karn, read about him doing the gig in his autobiography. Also if you look here... Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute (1988 TV Special) ...Mick Karn is in the cast & crew credits.
    3 points
  25. Well, i've just done the same to him. Bought a 150 quid item, and marked it payment made, but didnt pay him. Lets see what the [email protected] makes of that
    3 points
  26. 2 points
  27. That sure looks like Mick Karn from Japan. Head Bob - ✅ Wal- ✅ Have I got this wrong?
    2 points
  28. The respondents to this thread to date might not be your target audience mate IMO certainly not TC. 400+ and an 18 cab is not an easy thing to replicate. The Mesa solid state gear gets a lot of praise and some of the older units, for example the M-Pulse 600, BB-750 and if you're very lucky the Titan V-12 can be picked up relatively cheap these days. Personally I'd keep your cabs, they are not going to be easily replaced. Then again, personally I'd keep your 400+ also
    2 points
  29. I saw a band once (Pins)........ they did a soundcheck, and then left the stage for a while. The bass player just left the bass lying on the floor. Well I suppose it can't fall over from there!
    2 points
  30. So the tuner should be unclipped every time..? I thought the very usefulness came from it being immediately accessible..! Again, I don't even notice these things. How about a Go-Pro camera. Is that 'allowed'..? Or a camera and a clip-on tuner..!
    2 points
  31. As I was reading your post detailing all the issues I thought to myself, here we go, another sorry looking 80s natural wood bass. Then I got to the pictures, WOW! It's a stunner, I mean really nice. I'm jealous. 🙂
    2 points
  32. This, exactly what I do too! Listen first, dissect, play and listen! Visualise playing along when listening, knowing hand positions etc... it’ll soon stick
    2 points
  33. My all original '68 and CS Postmodern '19.
    2 points
  34. I did this to a neck some while ago, like yours it seemed to have come to the end of the adjustment but still had a forward bow. It worked a treat. I still have the bass, neck is still straight.
    2 points
  35. For what it’s worth, I’m a bit of an Ibanez fanboy for much the same reasons as you but mostly just the neck, I started off with a vintage SR800LE and sold it because I “fancied a change” spent a looonngg time going through precision’s, jazzes, MM basses to name a few but none of them ever felt right or comfortable to me, I sold the lot and started buying SR basses again I now have two SR’s (with a plan for two more) and a precision, never touch the precision, always feels too...lumpy...personally, I’d stick with the Ibanez’s because, among other reasons, you’ll not find a nicer 24 fret neck to play IMHO Just my 2p worth
    2 points
  36. Feeling very pleased with myself this afternoon! still got to sort electrics, getting the jack socket in with the board is tricky, so turned to a glass of red wine and will revisit that one tomorrow!
    2 points
  37. Great work. Looks like a brand new bass.
    2 points
  38. 2 points
  39. In the good old days Bass Player magazine did a full transcription, they're usually pretty accurate. I can dig it out if you're interested. Also, curious nuggets of info like it was played around the 7th/9th position (rather than open E and A strings) as in those days, the mid-range was more likely to be heard on AM radios with their tiny lo-fi speakers.
    2 points
  40. I learnt to play on an ‘89 SR800LE like @Doctor J’s one have since sold it and regretted it been through MANY different basses since but have since realised that the SR’s are definitely “my bass” currently own a stock SR500 and a modified SR300, currently on the lookout for another two as I have more mods planned as someone else said, cheap but extremely cheerful
    2 points
  41. It was an interesting question and an interesting read. Reassuring that most bassists playing covers adopt the same strategies that I have. You have to be on top of the feel and structure of the original but adapt your line to the band you are working with and your own skill set. I've only ever played in covers bands and at the peak probably had 150 songs with three bands that I might have to play at a moments notice. Between them we'd be learning maybe 3 or 4 new songs at any one time so you have in any case to have strategies just for coping. Don't let people see your feet furiously paddling under the water 'Beginners thing' is too pejorative. It's a learning thing I tried to learn the note for note bassline to 'Son Of A Preacher Man' recently, I didn't succeed because in the end the band just needed to get on with it but it taught me a lot about how a fairly simple pattern can add to a bass line and forcing myself out of the same old same old has freed up the way I play other songs too. There's loads to learn from other people's bass lines. we are all beginners
    2 points
  42. Thinking about this again, the bassline isn’t the only thing you have to factor in. Can your drummer play the drum line. Often (always?) the bassline depends on the interplay. I’ve never heard Crazy Little Thing Called Love - by Queen played properly by anyone other than John Deacon. The way he places the notes with Roger’s drumming is genius, just the right amount of swing but still pushing the beat (lots of swing is laid back). I’ve not even heard Queen play it properly since John left. And the proportion of cover bands I’ve heard play it and miss the subtleties has so far been 100%. I even tried to play it in a band several years ago, but the drummer couldn’t hold his tempo. If that kind of thing is important to you, most people will miss it anyway, then it’s something to consider before you grind yourself down with an impossible task.
    2 points
  43. Neil did a brief stint with Bill Bruford captured here:
    2 points
  44. I went for the short 5er in the spring time and have to say I'm very glad I did. Not only is it astonishing value for money, its pretty much unique in a mass produced bass. Can't think of another short 5er. Very glad about that because if this didn't exist I would have talked myself into a custom made job. Phew! Other than the pickups, what else did you do @Mikey D? Does anyone know of another short 5 or 6 stringer?
    2 points
  45. 2 points
  46. A new player on the scene..... don't be daft. John Paul Jones's bass part to the tune 'Ramble On' from the 1969 LP 'Ld Zeppelin II' https://bilbosbassbites.co.uk/ramble-on-led-zepellin/
    2 points
  47. Must admit i think the music business will be far more resilient than we think and it will come back fairly fast once they get the go ahead. Venues will be keen to get bands in and people will be keen to see their fav bands on tour again. I think we'll see a surge of bands touring again. Musicians like many other people will either have to live of Government money or retrain until their life returns to where it was. I have sympathy for anyone that's affected by it all. That's my positive head on tonight. Tomorrow i may have my negative head on and this will all change Dave
    2 points
  48. There are transcriptions of 'Fool For Your Lovin' by Whitesnake and 'Down To You' by Coloseum on my transcription site. https://bilbosbassbites.co.uk/fool-for-your-loving-whitesnake/ https://bilbosbassbites.co.uk/down-to-you-colosseum-ii/
    2 points


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