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Baloney Balderdash

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  1. Yes, I have noticed you like posts to be kept as short and pointless as possible, so this one is for you: It got action and relief. Does yours too?
  2. The Zoom MS60B has way more effects than the B3, cause it got upgraded with a new patch with a load of new effects unlike the B3, basically the same kind of quality though. The B1-Four got better quality effects, but fewer and with fewer editable parameters, but is about half the size of the B3. As for octaver, get a dedicated one, the ones build into multi effects are never good, I'd recommend the TC Electronic Sub'N'Up or Sub'N'Up Mini. The Zoom MS100BT is discontinued and basically the same as the MS60B, just discontinued and with fewer effects.
  3. Just out of curiosity really, how do you prefer your string action to be, and what is the action and relief on your main bass (if you got one, otherwise about average of your most played basses)? My main is a lowly, but very much beloved, Ibanez GSRM20 Mikro Bass, with a just 28,6" scale length. I have swapped out the cheap stock pickups with some of higher quality, but otherwise I was lucky to get an as good as perfect bass from stock, well beside from the absolutely horrifying bad setup it came with, as well as the stock strings were pretty crappy as well. Measured from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the low E string the action is just about 1.9mm (5/64" =/~ 0.075"), and just about 1.4mm (1/16" =/~ 0.055") on the high G string side, with as good as no relief in the neck, something that perhaps translates to something like an about 0.2mm (1/64" =/~ 0.0079") gap or so between the top of the 8th fret and the bottom of the low E string when it is fretted at first and last fret simultaneously. No fret buzz whatsoever on any of the strings no matter where on the fretboard they are fretted when played acoustically with a light touch, though certain strings fretted at certain frets does result in a slight buzz when digging in a bit harder, but again only when played acoustically, when the bass is actually amplified there is absolutely no hints of fret buzz anywhere to be found, though still adjusted sufficiently low for allowing me to force out some clanky attack if desired. But I do kind of have an idea about this kind of setup being about as low as you can go before it starts to affect the tone negatively, to some extend choking the string vibrations, no matter how perfectly leveled the frets might be. Though Regardless if this idea is actually true or not I prefer to be able to feel at least a slight amount to resistance when fretting the strings, for me to be able to feel that I am actually playing, as well as giving me a slightly more focused awareness of the fretboard and my playing. Preferably, for the sake of easy comparison, measure the string action at the 12th fret and the relief at 8th fret, like I did.
  4. Well, except if one is to trust the DiMarzio tone charge with a lot more mids, rated 8 in midrange, whereas the old Split P were just 5, slightly more bass with an 8,5 rating, versus the old Split P's 8, and slightly less treble as well, with a rated 5, versus the old Split P having a rating of 6. So not exactly the exact same. Here's the link to the new Relentless P on DiMarzio's homepage: https://www.dimarzio.com/pickups/standard-bass/relentless-middle And here's the link to the old Split P: https://www.dimarzio.com/pickups/standard-bass/split-p The new Relentless P also have less output and lower resistance than the Split P and all in all seems to be closer to a beefed up Model P pickup than a new take on the Split P, well except of for the blade humbucker part that the Split and Relentless does have in common. I could totally see myself getting a pair of these instead of my Model P, as said it seems like an upgrade with the output, low end and mids turned up slightly and as a bonus promissed to ve totally noiseless, which sadly can't be said about the Model P, even if I love the tone it gives me.
  5. There seem to be a rumor that they are, but the wraps are the same material as regular nickle roundwounds, the cores are different, and the nickle wraps are wrapped closer together. If you do a Google search on "D'Addario NYXL fret wear" you will find a lot of people having picked up this rumor asking but even more people who debunks it based on their own experience. Too early for me to be able to say if they do or not from personal experience, but judging from the above search it seems like there's 1 or 2 claims of increased fret wear being the case, a lot of people picking up on this rumor, asking if it is in fact the case, but then even more people replying that from their personal experience that there is absolutely nothing to it, which to me makes sense, since the NYXL strings are still essential nickle roundwound strings, even if having a different core material and the nickle being wrapped differently. The nickle wraps is still what will meet the frets, and since it's wrapped closer together on the NYXL strings, giving them a slightly smoother feel than regular nickle roundwounds, if anything the opposite should logically be the case, that they perhaps would even wear the frets slightly less.
  6. On a completely different note, your avatar image is from possibly my most favorite YouTube video clip of all times.
  7. Wow! That's flipping beautiful! Really manage to turn that old worn out superficial pop tune clichΓ© into an epic tale of deep existential failure and pain. That saxomophoneist hits a genuine artistic gold vain. No mountain of disasters will ever be big enough to stop him from sharing his truly unique artistic vision with the world! Go Sisyfos! I put all my faith in you! You are the shining sun that puts all other stars to shame!
  8. Most strings will have a similar difference in tension when tuned down a similar amount. Take my advice : The String Tension Pro online app from D'Addario that I linked to in the first reply in this thread really ought to be able to answer your questions.
  9. Some updates has happened since last I posted my pedal effects setup, though this time it seems pretty final for the musical bass project that currently got my main focus, but I will wait with posting it here until I, about time, eventually have bought a proper board to mount the pedals on, that up till now just have been single pedals linked together with patch cables on the floor. If all go as planed this should happen within a month from now. Especially needed now as my bass/drums/vocals solo project has involved into a bass/vocals and drums duo. So at our first rehearsal this coming Tuesday I will have to carry my pedals piled more or less randomly in a bag and patiently assemble my entire pedal effects chain, pedal by pedal, patch cable by patch cable, before we can start playing, and then disassemble and pack down the whole thing again afterwards. In the meantime there are pictures up and a full signal path go through on my forum profile: https://www.basschat.co.uk/profile/50585-baloney-balderdash/?tab=field_core_pfield_1
  10. Use this: http://web.daddario.com/StringTensionPro/Search Dial in the scale length of your bass, your current tuning and the current gauge of your strings, and note the tension displayed in the calculator, then plot in your new tuning and experiment with plotting in different gauges till you hit approximately the same tension in the calculator as the first result. This calculator is tuned for D'Addario strings in specific, but will approximately work for most strings of the same type you chose to plot in (nickle roundwound/stainless steel/flats e.t.c).
  11. Well, that was the basic essence of what I actually wrote about the NYXL strings in my OP, with all context cut away, if you want it even shorter, to the point of pointlessness, here you go: They are great! I like them a lot. Satisfied? Now tell me why you play bass and your favorite strings in 3 words.
  12. "....so I decided giving the D'Addario NYXL nickle roundwounds a try, which got a new high carbon steel alloy core, and with the nickle wound wrapped tighter together, as well as they have slightly lower tension than similar gauged XL nickle wound strings, making then more flexible and the tighter nickle wounds making them feel a bit smoother...." "....But the best thing is the considerably improvement of the tone these strings are responsible for! Beside the D'Addario NYXL having slightly higher output than regular D'Addario XL Nickle strings, and feeling a bit smoother and really nice on the fingers, they have this really snappy edge and punch, though without being too brittle or harsh, but rather having an exquisite clarity, as well as what sounds like a distinct upper mids boost, which I absolutely love. They actually got a bit of that stainless steel strings flavor, but without the fret eating part or the coarse feeling of playing on something reminiscent of a metal file. Time will tell how I like them when they are a bit more broken in and lost that spanking new strings metallic zing, but I can tell already now that even without that fresh string zing I will like the basic tone they deliver a lot more than regular XL strings, and the set of single strings I use is only about 40% more expensive than the XL set I used before, and as the consensus of people who use these strings seems to be that they typically will last up to 3 times longer than regular XL Nickle roundwound strings before they go dull, I'd say it is money well spend." There you go! That'll be 5 quid! Just use Mobile Pay.
  13. So I have been using a set of D'Addario XL Nickle roundwound strings on my main Ibanez GSRM20 Mikro Bass, that I upgraded with a DiMarzio Model P pickup wired directly to the output jack socket, with the J pickup lowered considerably and disconnected, using gauge .095 - .075 - .055 - .040 strings, and tuned in F# standard, 2 half steps above regular 4 string E standard tuning, since I figured out that was best suited for the musical project that has my main focus at the moment, a bass/vocals - drums sort of progressive psychedelic stoner rock duo, where I also run the bass signal through an always on 1 octave up effect, giving an effect somewhat similar to that of an 8 string "octave" bass, with pairs of respectively bass and octave strings (thanks to the editable EQ settings for the signal feed to the octave engine as well as the octave output signal of my TC Electronic Sub'N'Up Mini, and it's as good as flawless polyphonic tracking and exceptional low latency, it actually sound pretty close to natural in the mix, and without any traces of odd digital artifacts). However I recently found out that the bass riffs for the songs I have been working on for this project sounded even better with the bass tuned an additional half step up, to G strandard tuning, as in 2 half steps bellow A standard baritone tuning, and for that the string gauges I used had just a bit too much tension, being way too inflexible. So I decided giving the D'Addario NYXL nickle roundwounds a try, which got a new high carbon steel alloy core, and with the nickle wound wrapped tighter together, as well as they have slightly lower tension than similar gauged XL nickle wound strings, making then more flexible and the tighter nickle wounds making them feel a bit smoother. To get the desired tension I had to use guitar strings for the 3 upper strings though, which has slightly higher tension than the NYXL strings for bass at similar gauge, which I assume means a bit thicker core. Anyway, so I ended up with a gauge .095 NYXL bass string, and gauge .070 - .053 - .038 NYXL guitar strings, the length of the guitar strings actually fitting perfectly to my Mikro Bass's just 28,6" scale length, threading the guitar string through the cut off ball ends of bass strings, for them to not fall through the bridge string holes. That combination giving me almost perfectly balanced tension across all 4 strings, which is just about 30 lbs pr string when tuned to G standard (which is 1 to 2 lbs lower than the tension of the A and G string on a regular short scale 30" 4 string bass equipped with a gauge .100 to .045 D'Addario XL Nickle roundwound string set and tuned in regular E standard tuning), pretty much the same as the gauge .095 - .075 - .055 - .040 set tuned in F# standard, only the tension being even more equally balanced, including the .095 string, which otherwise had been about 2 lbs bellow the average tension of the other strings. And as it turned out they also happens to be really balanced output and tone wise. But the best thing is the considerably improvement of the tone these strings are responsible for! Beside the D'Addario NYXL having slightly higher output than regular D'Addario XL Nickle strings, and feeling a bit smoother and really nice on the fingers, they have this really snappy edge and punch, though without being too brittle or harsh, but rather having an exquisite clarity, as well as what sounds like a distinct upper mids boost, which I absolutely love. They actually got a bit of that stainless steel strings flavor, but without the fret eating part or the coarse feeling of playing on something reminiscent of a metal file. Time will tell how I like them when they are a bit more broken in and lost that spanking new strings metallic zing, but I can tell already now that even without that fresh string zing I will like the basic tone they deliver a lot more than regular XL strings, and the set of single strings I use is only about 40% more expensive than the XL set I used before, and as the consensus of people who use these strings seems to be that they typically will last up to 3 times longer than regular XL Nickle roundwound strings before they go dull, I'd say it is money well spend. The D'Addario NYXL nickle roundwound strings with a high carbon steel alloy core is no doubt by far my new favorite strings for bass. Just "Wauh!", simply amazing strings! Without question what I am going to use in the future for all my basses, and might even try them out for my electric guitar as well, even if I am actually really satisfied with the Elixir Nanoweb strings that is on my guitar currently (their bass strings not exactly my cup of tea though).
  14. A Jerry Jones Longhorn (a now discontinued, sort of high quality, high end, version of the Danelectro one, from a now retired luthier/company), just with a solid body mahogany body (the Longhorn is semi hollow), a Musicman pickup (the Nordstrand Big Blademan) in the P pickup position, an ebony fretboard, and a 28,6" scale length, I would pretty much have my dream bass. Here's how the regular real Jerry Jones Longhorn, that I once owened, but was stupid enough to part with looked, 24 frets, 16,6mm string spacing, 14,5" fretboard radius (not my bass on the picture though, just a random google one): Here are the specs: http://www.jerryjonesguitars.com/longhorn-bass4.html Though I love this body shape as well: And the B.C Rich headstock shape:
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