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  1. So it was my big boy 50th birthday this year and thought I would put together a decent bass as I couldn’t afford a 1980 walnut precision special (£3000) and didn’t feel confident enough skill wise that a self build course would give me the quality instrument I wanted. So I decided to put together a tribute, rather than a copy of said bass. I asked Walshy to build me a custom body (which in the end never happened), so in the end I bought one he had made previously from Chris/beedster. The neck is a roasted maple jazz neck with chrome hipshot tuners. The pickup is a fender custom shop 62 precision pick up going through a Kiogon cloth wired cts, top of the range loom. Currently has a fender bbot bridge but I have got a hipshot A style bridge to go on it a later date (possibly, but I quite like the look of this one). These parts were all bought from people off of BC. Needs a pro set up but even now sounds great to me. Think she might be a keeper. Thanks Basschat!
    29 points
  2. Seeing as we're offering opinions here, In my opinion I think you're daft to "shave" the saddles instead of using a shim - non-destructive always trumps destructive as far as I'm concerned.
    28 points
  3. I've been looking to replace my Spector Legend Custom (now sold to vmaxblues), with something more Fender flavoured as a backup to my Fender American Standard Jaguar. After lots of research I settled on a G&L Tribute, taking advantage of Andertons Black Friday/Cyber Monday/'well it's Christmas soon' £100 discount (still available!). I usually play my Jaguar with just the P pickup, in active mode with a little bass and treble boost, which gives it a really grindy tone that cuts through well in a one-guitar rock band. I'd never played a G&L, but the MFD pickups sounded like they'd give me the tone I was looking for. I was almost tempted by the £399 L2000, that seems like a lot of bass for the money, but wasn't sure I'd get on with that wide neck, so decided to go for the SB-2 at £349, with the more familiar 38mm neck. Available in Sonic Blue with a maple board, or Black Frost with Brazilian cherry, I decided on the black. When I opened the box, I was a little disappointed and wished I'd gone for the Sonic Blue. Despite being described as 'a classy gloss finish', it's more of a matte/satin finish, like the old Fender Highway 1s. It already had a slight mark on it, and is a fingerprint magnet. However, after a quick play, I realised it's very comfortable for my pick playing, and as my budget backup, I don't mind at all if it gets some early natural wear. It's a little more unique than the common black gloss basses too, it looks great. Construction and quality wise, it's far ahead of the Squiers I've played. Better than the most of the Fender Mexican Standards too, though perhaps a step below the Fender Deluxe Active Jazz I used to have (why did I sell that!?). The neck is very smooth - I'd describe as very well sanded as opposed to a satin finish like my Jaguar. The fretwork is perfect, on quite a thick fretboard compared to my Fender. The Brazilian cherry looks like it has a more coarse grain than rosewood, but certainly more attractive than the pau ferro other brands have been using. It's a light bass, definitely under 9lbs, I'll weigh it over the weekend, but it balances perfectly on a strap. The sound is exactly what I was looking for. It's a punchy, well defined tone, like a boosted active P. It doesn't have a tone control, just two volumes. Bringing in the Jazz pickup rounds things out a little, taking off that edge. Rolling back the volumes gives a more vintage tone. There's no noise at all. Having US-made pickups in these Indonesian-made basses should have them flying off the shelves quicker than the Squiers for similar money, especially with the Fender price rises this year, but perhaps they're missing the familiar shape and Fender name. With these current discounts I might be tempted to buy another! L-2000 or JB-2 next? 😄
    19 points
  4. 1983 Fender Precision (Fullerton ) in immaculate condition complete with Fender case £1350, I can't seem to edit the price No fret wear, and in showroom condition , I can't find any scratches or dents. This has been very well looked after and used at home only Nut width 44mm Weight 4.0 Kgs nice lowish action Microtilt neck The original white pickup covers were changed out for black ones but they will be put back on again prior to posting to keep it original No trades, cash sale only
    19 points
  5. Next time you rehearse ask him to turn his volume down to a reasonable level, don’t take no for an answer, explain your reasoning. When he refuses stick to your guns, just stick to them, he’s an unreasonable egoist bellend and nothing, but nothing, exposes idiots like reasonable reasoned requests. You’ll be home by eight and can start looking for a band who can actually work together democratically.
    16 points
  6. Not being able to count bars is not "playing by feel".
    14 points
  7. When you start forgetting what you own. Someone on here found an Alembic Stanley Clarke while clearing out their wardrobe.
    14 points
  8. How many are too much ? I've something like 68 basses at home. I won't clutter up the thread by posting photos of them all , just take my word for it ; 68 bass guitars is too many.
    14 points
  9. Here’s some of my work if anyone wants one done 😁
    13 points
  10. A what? A Crews Maniac Sound Uncle! AKA a lovely hand-made in Japan Stingray killer. Crews Maniac Sound are a Japanese custom shop (think Atelier Z, Sadowsky Japan (RIP), Moon etc) that make a host of high-end instruments with strange names. This one is a very high quality build in a natural oil finish complete with SD Basslines pickup & preamp, Badass II bridge, lightweight tuners and a stunning Pau Ferro fretboard. As is often the case with oiled finishes, the bass is showing a fair bit of honest play wear. I had intended to get it refinished at some point but now need to move some basses on to pay for boring house stuff... If you like a genuine road-worn look, you're in luck! The bass comes with the original Crews branded flight case, tools, instructions and the never-fitted transparent pickguard and screws.
    13 points
  11. A drunk punter came up to me once at the end of a gig and siad 'you've got a great moustache'. In the absence of anything else, I'll take that
    12 points
  12. OK - I think we are on the final furlong With grandparenting duties done for a few weeks I have a fairly uninterrupted run to finish this off. Jack and I have been doing some work on the headstock arrangement and he has come up with a shape that I think works beautifully. It gives a respectful nod to the original but is its very own. This is a mockup, but later today I will be cutting and gluing on the actual ebony plate. At the same time, I've been experimenting with some ebony offcuts from the top wood to see how well a 'no finish, just sanding & buffing' approach (think violin fretboard) works. The trials went well and so I did a quick and nasty to see how it works on the whole top. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder but...I reckon it works
    12 points
  13. I would suggest that everyone in the band should have the same luxury of being allowed to play 'by feel' adding or removing bars (or half bars) at will, and then play a few songs to see how well it goes.
    12 points
  14. Unless he admits that "I play by feel" really means: 1) I can't count bars, 2) I can't be bothered doing this properly, 3) I don't respect other people and I'm a giant toddler who needs everything my way, 4) All of the above
    12 points
  15. Sounds like a right tool. Move on.
    12 points
  16. I don't believe that there are guitarists as you describe...😉😉
    12 points
  17. Well the correct number of basses is n+1, where n is the current number owned. Therefore it stands to reason that n+2 is too many. 🤓
    12 points
  18. Very nice gig in a 17th century church in a little East Yorkshire village last night. A far cry from our normal haunts but enjoyable nonetheless
    12 points
  19. Total setup later, straightened the neck, lowered the action, new D'Addario strings, switch cleaner, oiled fretboard..... etc..... It's a beast. Plays beautifully, sounds massive. I've had to lower the pentometer output as it was almost as in your face as my Spector Euro 5 used to be. It's a fabulous thing, very modern sounding, punchy, and weirdly, turned to passive, sounds quite P bass like. Love it. Total bargain.
    11 points
  20. Well, Been a month (just over) now since discharge from hospital. Have picked up a nice CS fretted Jazz to fill the fretted hole, but the Uberhorn is still the Bass that I come back to time after time. It gets at least some play time every day - even if it's just 10 or 15 mins. I still feel like I'm getting to know it each time I play it, and it feels like more and more of a friend every time as well. I think it's rare to find any instrument that you really connect with.
    11 points
  21. I couldn't be doing with that. Personally I like a band to be tight, and for me that means everyone knowing exactly where all the changes are and sticking to them. It's no good me launching into the chorus if the guitarist decides he wants to noodle on for a few more bars. He sounds like a bedroom guitarist that never learnt to play with a band, knows his shortcomings and makes excuses for them like "I play by feel", and gets angry when he's 'found out'.
    11 points
  22. Eeeeeh. Absolutely cannot abide folk who can’t read the room. The original 602 guitarist who left and came back (never go backwards) was all about allotted solo time and paining over ridiculous details like how much “space, sonically speaking” he had in which to solo. He was like a fun sponge, as well as relentlessly loud, obnoxiously so…we’d all had enough second time round and he got upset that the drums and bass “overshadowed the nuance in the guitar parts” He sounds like a headache of a slightly different ilk, but equally as irksome. It you have to ask - and you don’t seem over the moon with it, put the feelers out for another band. There’s creative tension, which can be good - and friction which basically will make you want to boil your own head. And the aggression when challenged, having to be taken outside to calm down? preposterous.
    11 points
  23. Ah yes, that current new fad of flatwound strings. it'll soon blow over 😄
    11 points
  24. So. start again with rhythm guitarist - get a set list together you’re both happy with. advertise for a singer (unless either of you are confident vocalists?) Attend any local open mic nights - there will be some around Kendal I’d guess. See if there are any drummers about. Joinmyband website and Facebook are the “music shop notice boards” and “back pages of the melody maker” these days. I’ve had varying results. Make a pact with mr Rhythm that you’ll communicate when things aren’t going well. Keep having fun with it.
    10 points
  25. Steinberger holes drilled - so time for a gratuitous mock-up When sanded and buffed, the fretboard and headstock plate will polish up to the same sort of satin finish as the ebony on the body. The remaining visible neck laminates will darken with the application of the Tru-oil but will buff up to a similar sheen. They don't do the Steinbergers in nickel but I think they are far enough away from the main body. Only a few jobs left on the basic build and then I can move onto the final sanding and finishing.
    10 points
  26. I’ve had better relationships with some amps than with some previous girlfriends, none of them had such a variety of interesting sockets round the back.
    10 points
  27. I joined a band who were having a real torrid time with their "lead" guitarist. Too loud, too centred on his "solos" and too concerned by how he sounded and really didn't care about anyone else or their enjoyment of the situation. One rehearsal the conversation was had. He was told in no uncertain terms that he was just too loud. Sadly he wouldn't have any of it, so we decided to take more drastic action. It went something along the lines of: [End of song being rehearsed. Guitarist still about 15395db too loud] Guitarist: Right, I'm off out for a tab [Door closes] Everyone else: Go! [Fuse extracted from amp plug and from pedalboard power supply amp and replaced with pre-determined duds] [Guitarist returns] Guitarist: Er... I have no power. What's going on? Lead Singer: Dunno mate, my amp is fine and the PA is on...? Me: Bass amp on over here mate.. [Guitarist swaps plug sockets, extension lead etc..] Guitarist: WTAF?? Keys Player: I reckon you've blown that amp mate - told you it was too loud.. Guitarist: Blown it? Really? Lead Singer: Yeah. I did hear a popping noise when you were out. Me: And a bit of a crackle... Guitarist: Oh poop. This is my dad's amp as well.. [Guitarist packs up in a hurry and leaves] We didn't see him again.....
    10 points
  28. Apologies for the slight OT-ness, but here's some shots I took while working on the doc. The executive producer was Geoff Wonfor (Beatles Anthology, the Tube, etc.), and the crew were absolutely top-notch. Contributor-wise, Sting and Elvis Costello were the first names on board, and the rest followed suit.
    10 points
  29. 2009 MIJ Sadowsky Metro 4-string Jazz Bass Guitar Natural Ash Body with Maple Neck Rosewood Board with White Blocks and Binding Sadowsky Hum Cancelling Pick-ups with 1970s positioning Sadowsky pre-amp:- Volume Pan Bass Boost Treble Boost Vintage Tone Control Active/Passive Switch Weight: 4.3Kg/9.5lb. Comes with Sadowsky semi-hard case Consider trades with cash to me for : Fender 4-string P or PJ, with 41mm or less nut Musicman USA 4-string Sterling (Not Sterling by Musicman)
    10 points
  30. Rolled the clock back last night. Depped for the Madness tribute I used to play with. First time the original line up has been together for nearly ten years. I love playing with the drummer, we used to be in a Specials trib together many moons ago, and that bassist/drummer chemistry is still there between us. Used my Bruce Thomas Profile, Trace head into Barefaced cabs and for the first time in my life sight read an entire gig, from my own scores. Really chuffed.
    10 points
  31. Amazingly Beautiful 5 String Ken Smith bass, sounds as good as you would expect. Very comfortable to play with great definition and even tone across the neck. Bought this just before the first lockdown for a tour that got cancelled and then cancelled again a year later. I prefer my Ken Smith 6 string so I'm not using this. Has a few very small dings, not really noticeable and the case is immaculate. Such a wonderful dense wood consistency, but not really that heavy. A joy to play.
    9 points
  32. After waiting quite a long time I've finally got my Mayones Cali 4 bass. Pics below!
    9 points
  33. Bass now ready to have the neck and body carving done, really please with how this is turning out.
    9 points
  34. For anybody interested, or may stumble across this post in the future, I sent the pickup to Armstrong Pickups for repair. Was returned in just over 1 week working perfectly. The repair cost was extremely reasonable too - highly recommended!
    9 points
  35. Bit of a spurt on this weekend. The grill was done on Saturday and Sunday I got the centre section covered. Yesterday I re glued some edges that I deliberately left light on glue to stop to much squeezing out. I collected the corners from the nickel platers today and put those on. It’s all finished, baring some excess glue around some joints which needs rubbing off and I’ve bought some black bumper epoxy to build up the gap on the broken input plate.
    9 points
  36. My favourite description seen here on BC was 'The sound of a crowd of angry squirrels hurling nuts at a tin roof'. Whoever came up with that deserves a medal or something.
    9 points
  37. It's not the complete history unless there's two hours of footage of walking into guitar shops throughout the last 40 years and hearing relentless and merciless clicketty-clacketty coming from the bass section.
    9 points
  38. It is well recognised in guitar and bass building circles that hand radiussing ebony fretboards is: - the quickest way to insanity (takes days but insanity is assured) - likely to result in a tapered or skewed profile down the board however hard you try I built myself a router rig a few years ago - better but not perfect - then invested in the excellent G&W router jig a year or so ago. It's b****y wonderful After about 25 minutes, I'd got the shape roughed out over two passes Then another 15 minutes with a radius block to just remove the router cutter lines: And done
    8 points
  39. This gem moved in today; I bought it from a friend... Mensinger Joker B6, 35" and 3/4" (19 mm) spacing...
    8 points
  40. Posts like this always remind me of the words of wisdom I got from Martin Ace, long-time bass player of the Welsh band Man. His philosophy of bass playing in a band was, “if you’re bothered about being unappreciated, overlooked or misunderstood you’ve probably chosen the wrong instrument.” But we know, don’t we 😉
    8 points
  41. I play with a really low action and I’ve shimmed many basses successfully, it works perfectly if done correctly
    8 points
  42. Shims are fine if done correctly.
    8 points
  43. It's funny, isn't it. There is no doubt that manufacturing tolerances are better now. There will always be a market for "things which were cool when I was young but I could not afford them then so I will have it now". And what those things are will change with time. But does older = better? For me? No. When I were a lad anything that was after 1965 was uncool. Now anything from the 70's is considered exciting. I have a 66J from Jan the 5th (so very nearly 65!) and a neck and body from a 73P. Both function very nicely and the sniffiness which I would have met had I been championing the 73 in the 80s has completely dissipated. I would not have been championing it in the early 80s anyway, because I knew that anything from the 70s sucked badly. The only real difference I can see apart from the actual wood is finishes. The wood they were using was probably better quality lumber because that was what they had and it had been drying for longer. That was how they did it. None of it was deliberately fancy. It was just what was at the local lumber yard. So there is an argument for the wood - but I am not going to go there. Do I prefer a nitro finish to a poly finish? Yes, I do. For THE TOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONE!!!!!!!!? Not really, I just like the tactile nature of it. I like the aesthetic. And the aesthetic is a very important part. I have been through 3 Bravewoods in my time. For me they have that aesthetic in spades. And they sounded great (and were not using that old wood). Just not enough strings. But they totally ticked that box. If I were to A/B one of theses Bravewoods against my 66 then they would be different. Not better, or worse, just different. Two different flavours of great. And as soon as we subjected either to Guitarmageddon and a Drummer then any of the subtleties would disappear without a trace. And I suspect that working out which was which in a blind test would be virtually impossible. Two 66Js from Jan the 5th would be different from each other. The infamous Bass Bash where someone played 17 gazillion basses behind a curtain and virtually no one could tell the difference between them was very telling. On a straight up plugging in and recording or playing metric, my newer basses are better instruments. And I have played/owned the good, old stuff so am at least entitled to an opinion. Of course, there are other metrics in play here. It is arguable that 1 bass which can do ALL the tones will have the owner spending more time sorting the tone than they would actually writing and playing that killer song/riff. There is a discipline created by limitations which means that the creativity has to be directed in a different direction. Any bass you can buy now, once it is set up will do all we need. We would do well to get over ourselves and actually write music. I am talking to myself here more than anyone else. This stream of consciousness rambling has been brought to you by an empty staff room during my lunch hour.
    8 points
  44. Inspired by the comments here, I had a go yesterday, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Honestly, I don't think I would have had a go without hearing that so many of you have had to grit your teeth and go for it. I stayed reasonably well back from the mike, so I could hear myself rather than the PA, I forgot my earplugs (we don't practice at great volume) 🙂 To cut along story short, Dakota was fine (not surprising!), chorus of Rebel Rebel was impossible, I managed the 'Please.... Please' on Stuck in the Middle with you, and was pleasantly surprised to cope with the tail end of Baggy Trousers, although the chorus was too much going on! No-one complained, which means either they couldn't hear me or I was more or less in time/tune. Yes, I did check my mike was live 🙂 I've got a reasonable range, but when I can't hear myself well I tend to jump up an octave into my head voice at inappropriate moments; this is something for practice, but less important for backing vocals as they tend not to go up and down a lot. So I shall practice at home, stick to the ones I can sing without fumble-fingers and gradually approach the mic closer until I reach the point where I get asked to keep it down 🤣 Thanks folks, I hope your suggestions encourage other people as well.
    8 points
  45. I played a gig a couple of weeks ago. The booker got the times wrong so we hung around for two hours before we played. Then the one hour drive back over the pitch dark hills with shredded fingers and humping the bass and gear upstairs when I got home. So I’ve cancelled the remaining two gigs in my diary and decided it’s time at 80 to finally pack up. If the Covid lockdown hadn’t interrupted the momentum I’d probably be playing a lot still. But I’ve got a lot to be grateful for. Most of my mates from schooldays turned pro and did well for themselves and I was in a minority in staying out. But I’ve still played with in excess of 120 bands as a permanent or freelance (I’ve got them all listed in my little black book) and made some great music. so, you guys, don’t ‘programme’ your retirement. Just keep playing and enjoying your stuff right up to the point when your body will tell when it’s time to stop. It’s a gift to make music - any sort, any standard - so enjoy it. A lot.
    8 points
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