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funkle

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About funkle

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    Seeker of the New
  • Birthday 24/09/1977

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    Edinburgh

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  1. Bought a solderless P bass loom from John, the Bourns pots feel like quality pots and the wiring looks, feels, and sounds great. Another happy customer here! Thanks John. I will be ordering from you again for other projects.
  2. The lowest tension Chromes end up being same tension as their 45-105 round wound XL set. Makes it easy to transition between basses, for me...tension is the same.
  3. I love Chromes. They are pretty bright for a flat, and D’Addario has me sold generally on their strings, especially as they supply detailed information on tension. After a while, they stop being grabby, and they just feel and sound great. Thumpy and warm, but with brightness at the attack. Probably much brighter than most other flats I have experimented with. I had a few goes around with the Thomastik flats, but every time I sold them or moved them on. I just could not get used to them. Great quality string though.
  4. I would recommend an Ibanez Talman. I have given an honest review of the TMB105 - here: The TMB105 is firmly in the Fender tone and looks universe. That’s why I bought it. It’s £200. It sounds fab, but does need work in my opinion - not a case of buy it and forget it. That said, it’s so cheap you can do what you like to it without much fear or cost. Including new tuners to assist with seated neck dive and chambering, if you wanted....But it will take effort and money.
  5. Ok, so I filed down the nut slots, polished the frets, and oiled the fretboard. Didn't take too long. Then I cracked open the bass to have a look at the electronics, and had some pleasant surprises. First of all, the bass is shielded - in parts. The back of the pickguard has conductive foil tape. The main cavity for the pre, output jack plate, and P pickup are all painted with conductive paint. My handy multimeter tells me this paint actually works as well. This was a pleasant surprise on a £200 instrument. The battery compartment isn't shielded, but had conductive tape on the cover. Pleasantly, there are ferrules for the screws for the battery cover to screw into, which means the cover shouldn't fall off with the wear from repeated access. However, perhaps not surprisingly, the Jazz bass pickup cavity wasn't shielded at all, and pretty messy. The pickup springs are embedded in the foam (looks like Stew Mac pickup mounting foam with springs in it - very nice), and the bottom of the pickup is potted in wax (I think - a clear thick stuff anyway), which means the pickup pole bottoms are isolated and won't conduct through contact with the metal springs in the foam. That means it is easy to shield the cavity without worrying about accidentally grounding out the pickup. So... I cleaned it up and painted it with conductive paint....however it was old and didn't work. Boo Then...used copper foil tape with conductive adhesive backing...screwed in a cable into the foil and then screwed the other end into a common ground in the main cavity. Since that had a screw fixing in it as well, it meant it was a solderless job; just loosened the screw there and screwed it in. Honestly, I'm not sure shielding the Jazz bass pickup cavity made much odds. I probably wouldn't bother with it again. It probably just needs a humbucking pickup at the bridge to become hum free. A single coil will always hum to some degree, I guess. So there you go. Some surprisingly quality finds on such a cheap instrument. Shielding and a really nice pickup mounting system. Ibanez are doing things very well for not much money. I'm super impressed.
  6. Sold some strings to Adam - painless and quick transaction. Would be delighted to deal with him again!
  7. Morning all Put these on a 34” standard Precision Bass, and took them off again - on for about a week, if that. These are just not for me. Gone to flats instead. £50 new, save yourself the cash and buy mine instead. £27 posted in the UK, bargainous. Pete
  8. Ok, well, for me, the TMB105 I like better than either the Sire V7 or the P7. The Sires are way better out of the box - nut slots cut well, the fantastic necks, good fretwork, rolled edges, the finishes, slightly better tuners - and much less neck dive tendency - but I like the sound and punch of the TMB105 more. To be fair. The P7 sounds great, and has similar tones out of it. But it weighed nearly 11 lbs...and I think I like the 2 band preamp better than a 3 band. Less for me to mess up. So the P7 went back. I’m going to try and get my hands on a TMB505 to compare to the 105. But right now, the 105 is the bass to beat. Even though it needs work, as I described before.
  9. I would strongly advise against building a custom instrument unless you are very certain what you want. My experience of ordering expensive custom instruments has largely led me to the conclusion that my wants are not consistent over time, and it is generally way smarter to buy what is available, rather than make what isn’t. Even modding is something I look at very carefully now - if it’s not reversible, I’m largely avoiding it. I love maple necks now. 6-7 years ago, probably turned down loads of great basses with them. I like P/JJ/PJ pickups now (Stingray pickups at a real stretch), years ago, I wanted modern humbuckers in some instruments. Gone right off them now. Other tastes re: finishes etc have changed as well for me. Don’t do it. Buy secondhand or new, but not custom. Not unless you are really really certain about what you are doing.
  10. Thanks @daveybass I have often found that there is considerable variability to instrument weights, and manufacturers can be 'creative' in their descriptions. You may get more interest if you were willing to weigh your specific instrument. Your screenshots are really helpful. Unfortunately the screenshot of the Warwick website doesn't list in them what the string spacing is at the bridge. I'm guessing it might be 16.5mm after trawling websites, but again, it's a key spec for most people looking at 5ers and would probably be good to know. I have assumed it is 16.5mm for now, and will withdraw my interest. Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions though. GLWTS! Pete
  11. Agh, can’t get that website to work on mobile. I’ll try later on PC. Apologies...and how much does this specific instrument weigh?
  12. Nice. Do you know the weight, nut width, and string spacing? And is the string spacing adjustable? Thanks very much. Pete
  13. I picked up a TMB105 instead. Not sure if it is getting kept yet....wait and see....but it sounds great.
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