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grapevinebass

Help me understand...

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I see an interesting looking bass on the For Sale Forum, so click to look at it.  But someone has thrown it downstairs, or skimmed it across a gravel drive. What it's meant to look that way? You mean someone took a nice new bass and beat it up, taking chunks out of the lacquer.

Why would someone do this, indeed why would anyone pay to have this done to a bass guitar?

Beyond my understanding. 

Then it gets advertised as 'in good condition'. No - its been mutilated!

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It's just a personal thing. I needed to buy a p-bass style instrument for my current gig and chose to get a vintage 'relic' finish p-bass, as I thought it suited the vibe of the band better than a new finish.

If I get another, I'd probably look at a 'relic' from Jon Shuker.

My main bass is a 5 string MusicMan Bongo, which sounds great, but doesn't fit the image.

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It's down to taste. Personally, I rather like the worn look, even if it is faked. Modern guitars don't age the way older instruments do. The lacquer is different, so no matter how well used a guitar is these days, it's not going to wear out in that cool way.

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I agree with the OP, but then I’m a bit OTT with keeping my car pristine, as well as my basses..

 

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I don't understand why any manufacturer would take a beautiful, prestine instrument straight off the manufacture line and paint it bright red, but I suppose some folks like it. 😉

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OK. Most of my guitars are red, apart from the purple one. So indeed it is a matter of taste. Though I still think relic-ing a guitar is like buying a new car then scaping it along a garage wall and then driving it into a bollard so it looks like it has been around the block a few times!

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This is a seemingly neverending debate on guitar forums but it all comes down to personal taste and that manufacturers can satisfy that taste. There was a real hooha recently when it was noticed that Fender use a stencil/pattern to mark the areas of wear - not sure if this is just on the heavier relics or on all.

I quite like the lighter relic (think they may be Journeyman or Light Relic) as they look quite subtle and certainly more realistic than the very heavy relic. It also means there's not much worry if you then mark or chip the guitar yourself. I also realise that lots of people like an unmarked guitar and manage to keep it that way, that's fine, too.

 

 

Edited by KevL
Add words.

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I don’t mind a bit of artificial wear if it’s subtle and looks like it’s the result of many years of use. I look after my stuff and despite years of, er, energetic gigging it’s still clean and pretty much ding free. I often wonder how people’s gear gets into the state it’s in.
 

Similarly, when I see other people’s gear at gigs or rehearsal studios I’m often struck by just how dirty some it is. Build up of gunk on the frets, greasy finger marks... some people must never clean their stuff.

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Must admit I prefer natural wood and all my instruments are understated. Exception is a gold Aria guitar which was bought because I was after something cheap with a whammy bar to experiment with (meh), will get traded in against a fretless bass next year.

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Loads of threads on this previously, all pretty much the same, and as you’d expect there’s no definitive answer. Try a search.

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I love the worn look on my basses, but that is because I can point at most dings and say "that it where I clipped the doorframe in '92 when getting on the bus with it", or that is where the strap broke in 2004 and I caught it, but still did that".  It tells our (mine and the instrument's)" story, especially around how clumsy I am.

When I see old basses for sale covered in dings and scratches, I love to imagine what those stories might have been with their previous owners.

I'd feel I'd been cheated if they were faked and added on.  Of course, this is only my own opinion, no criticism of others intended.  

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1 hour ago, BrunoBass said:

I often wonder how people’s gear gets into the state it’s in.

When we were gigging regularly, much as I tried to look after gear, drunken punters can fall against, knock over or even worse,  grab your guitars by the neck. Thus causing dings and scratches that would never appear normally.

Edited by ubit
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2 hours ago, grapevinebass said:

 Though I still think relic-ing a guitar is like buying a new car then scaping it along a garage wall and then driving it into a bollard so it looks like it has been around the block a few times!

If I ever bought a brand new Land Rover Defender and it was an option then I'd opt for the Reliced finish :).  It's all about the image.

I have a roadworn and a non-roadworn Sandberg V series, love them both (but the road worn one a little more)

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Not my bag, but as others have said above. It’s each to their own really :)

Its one of a long list of things I find aesthetically unappealing on a bass. Along with; Gold Hardware, Fender type basses without pickguards, Ramps, PJ pickup configuration, Headless basses... The list goes on... I’m sure the kind of instruments I like would be anathema to others as well.

Takes all sorts :) 

 

Edited by CamdenRob

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2 hours ago, ubit said:

When we were gigging regularly, much as I tried to look after gear, drunken punters can fall against, knock over or even worse,  grab your guitars by the neck. Thus causing dings and scratches that would never appear normally.

Wow. I gig regularly in rowdy pubs where beer gets spilt and mic stands get knocked etc, but I’ve never had anyone grab my bass by the neck. I’d be grabbing them by the neck if anyone ever did that...

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This vintage look guitar thing does seem odd to me too.  After all, no one buys pre rusted, artisan dented cars, or computers will faked aged yellow plastics and craftsmen painted coffee cup rings, so why the need to do such things to guitars?

I don't have a downer if people dig that sort of thing, it just goes over my head.

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12 minutes ago, Bassfinger said:

After all, no one buys pre rusted, artisan dented cars

Believe it or not, they do! They're called Rat Rods... Not my thing but some people like them. 

Don't forget there's also the Shabby chic furniture thing. 

Rat rod https://g.co/kgs/EdQNN2

 

Typical_Rat_Rod.jpg

Edited by DoubleOhStephan
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9 minutes ago, Bassman Sam said:

I don't like  relic basses as I would miss the massive guilt trip and disappointment of putting the first ding on a new one. 

Every single mint bass I’ve ever had, bar three IIRC, has immediately been walked into a door/wall/fallen off a stand/had something fall on it, etc. So pristine doesn’t work for me, it’s a complete waste of time.

I always liked worn guitars. Before I even started playing I thought Rory Gallagher’s guitar looked ace, and the first time I saw Jaco’s Jazz I thought it looked awesome. More to the point, I generally find that they feel better to play, for whatever reason. Maybe it’s psychological, who knows?

 

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Relic is not my thing at all, but you try selling a bass with a few marks and scratches to someone who has a relic'ed bass and see what they say 🙂

 

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51 minutes ago, Bassman Sam said:

I don't like  relic basses as I would miss the massive guilt trip and disappointment of putting the first ding on a new one. 

I can fully understand this. I am becoming even clumsier in my old age. Not long ago I lost control of some small thing I was holding and made a little dent in my Ovation 6-string. I could have cried. The guitar is 25 years old .... I have only 1 bass, an acoustic Ibanez, and AFAIK it remains undinged. The inevitable awaits 😨

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