Jump to content

'Pistol'. A Danny Boyle series.


Maude

Recommended Posts

17 minutes ago, Maude said:

 

 

I haven't commented anymore as I don't have any subscription TV. 

If it eventually gets an airing on terrestrial I'll watch it. 

Same, my TV isn’t compatible with Disney Plus (which I ironically view as a minus) so if terrestrial gets hold of it I’ll give it a view. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Lozz196 said:

Same, my TV isn’t compatible with Disney Plus (which I ironically view as a minus) so if terrestrial gets hold of it I’ll give it a view. 

I don’t have Disney+ either 😎😬

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Maude said:

I haven't commented anymore as I don't have any subscription TV. 

If it eventually gets an airing on terrestrial I'll watch it. 

Me too. Looks like its worth a watch, but not a bloody Disney subscription.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well it turns out my son has a Disney+ subscription and I can download it on my Firestick. 

So it looks like I can give this a whirl after all. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Cat Burrito said:

I enjoyed it. Brain in neutral and just try not to overthink things. I think John Lydon's moaning has really helped raise the profile. 

Which, given how Malcom McClaren used particular, promotional tactics, makes one wonder if it has all been on purpose and in cahoots.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've recently watched the first two episodes and am still on the fence. I'm too young to have experienced The Sex Pistols in real life and I'm not a massive (or any sized) fan of the band and never will be, so I can really comment on whether the facts and indeed the overall vibe, are accurate. 
 

Viewing it a stand-alone drama, it's okay and seems to be well scripted. If I didn't have an idea of who Lydon or McLaren are I'd say the characters are completely OTT and very unrealistic. Knowing the limited amount I do though, they seem to be well cast. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I watched the first two last night. I quite enjoyed them. The Sex Pistols were way before my time, but I was aware of them by the time I got to my teens, and of course played the almost compulsory for any young rock covers band, Anarchy in the UK. 

 

I know absolutely nothing about Steve whatshisface who's memoirs it's based on, so it's interesting as a stand alone drama. I'm not sure how accurate it is, and I'm not sure I really care. So far it's a decent watch, and the guy playing Johnny had me in stitches. He's got the mannerisms down to a T. 

 

 

Edited by Newfoundfreedom
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would cheerfully watch the whole series if I had the time as a guilty pleasure. But it's a complete fiction on every level.

 

What irks me about it is the way this show presents itself as a serious historical dissection of the 1970s. It also perpetuates the same old lazy falsehoods that punk rock and the Sex Pistols in particular arrived in the nick of time revive pop music and popular culture in general.

 

Contrary to this propagated version of British history, in reality the 1970s was a pretty good time to live in this country. And most people were perfectly happy to with the music they were listening to pre-1977.   That's not surprising because there was so much great music in the 1970s. Punk rock was a novelty because of its shock value. Nothing more than that. It was not the salvation of Western Civilization as some would try have you believe nowadays.

 

I can certainly see why John Lydon is upset about it. It really is a Disney version of reality.

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Misdee said:

It also perpetuates the same old lazy falsehoods that punk rock and the Sex Pistols in particular arrived in the nick of time revive pop music and popular culture in general.

 

Contrary to this propagated version of British history, in reality the 1970s was a pretty good time to live in this country. And most people were perfectly happy to with the music they were listening to pre-1977.   That's not surprising because there was so much great music in the 1970s. Punk rock was a novelty because of its shock value. Nothing more than that. It was not the salvation of Western Civilization as some would try have you believe nowadays.

 

^^^ This....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Misdee said:

I would cheerfully watch the whole series if I had the time as a guilty pleasure. But it's a complete fiction on every level.

 

What irks me about it is the way this show presents itself as a serious historical dissection of the 1970s. It also perpetuates the same old lazy falsehoods that punk rock and the Sex Pistols in particular arrived in the nick of time revive pop music and popular culture in general.

 

Contrary to this propagated version of British history, in reality the 1970s was a pretty good time to live in this country. And most people were perfectly happy to with the music they were listening to pre-1977.   That's not surprising because there was so much great music in the 1970s. Punk rock was a novelty because of its shock value. Nothing more than that. It was not the salvation of Western Civilization as some would try have you believe nowadays.

 

I can certainly see why John Lydon is upset about it. It really is a Disney version of reality.

 

 

 I recently went to see Danny Baker and Bob Harris  on their tour.

 

Mr Baker, whom lived through the Punk movement, touring with the bands, and generally "having a good time" on NME expenses, said pretty much the same thing.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it very much depends what you like music-wise. I pretty much hated everything that came after glam rock in the 70s and the middle of decade was very much a low point for me musically (and my record collection at the time pretty much bears this out). The Sex Pistols and The Clash might not have "saved" rock music, but they most definitely opened the doors for the post-punk bands. I couldn't see any of them getting any kind of record label interest prior to "punk".

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Misdee said:

And most people were perfectly happy to with the music they were listening to pre-1977. 

 

Indeed so. Many people merely expanded their musical tastes to include punk while continuing to buy the latest offerings from the Zeppelin, Genesis, Yes and - er - Leo Sayer. A smaller number hurled themselves into a full-body realignment, emerging with shorn locks, a repellent pallor and unfeasibly tight black drainpipe jeans.

 

The further one went from London the less the popular impact of punk. Yes, there were punk bands in the provinces but I can state with absolute certainty that crushed velvet loons, shoulder-length hair and a tendency to look at the world from the business end of a colossal joint were still the prevailing fashions in Hull in 1980. 

 

While the big bands may have panicked prematurely only a very few fell irrevocably by the wayside. Some, like ELP, may have thrown in the towel by 1979 but others, like Queen simply re-grouped and got bigger. In hindsight punk was a ripple on the surface of popular culture; a harking back, in some respects, to the brevity and simplicity of early rock'n'roll and occupying much the same place in wider public consciousness (Must we fling this filth at our pop kids?).

 

Perhaps the most significant impact of punk was the later adoption of skinny ties by middle-aged men who should have known better. That, and the perpetually arrested development of a significant minority now well into their dotage but who have extended punk's initial fiery nihilism and anti-establishment posture well beyond its use-by date.
 

Edited by skankdelvar
Changed two words, big improvement, made all the difference. Happy now.
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Raymondo said:

Punk rock was a novelty because of its shock value.

 

Perhaps... But what it did do was encourage kids to get up and start playing in bands in a DoWhatTheFeckYouWant sort of way, where creativity, or at least Being Out There, was valued over absolute musical ability. 

Which, as a 14-15 year old at the time, I loved!

Though of course nowadays, while Punk's Not Dead, it is often Formulaic Nostalgia...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I lived in London and was exactly the right age to be the target demographic for punk. I hated it with a vengeance at the time, but I’ve come round to some of it over the years.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...