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Rotosound Competition!!

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Hi folks

Long time BC friend Jason at Rotosound wants to offer you the chance to win big in a new BC exclusive competition. The prizes:

6 people will win a year's worth of Rotosound strings (8 sets) and a factory tour.

20 runners up will win a Rotosound T shirt!

All you have to do is tell us who your favourite Rotosund endorsee is, and why. We'll pick the winners from the thread in one month's time and arrange the prizes. So please comment below for your chance to win!

Cheers

ped

rotosound_logo.jpg

If you're interested, BC visited the factory a few years ago - you can read about that here!

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Sounds good to me!

Probably a slightly cliched choice - and I'm assuming historic endorsees count - but mine would have to be John Entwistle. Without his testing and input, the roundwound bass string could have been a completely different beast from the ones we know today. Nearly 20 years ago, I started using Rotosound Swing Bass strings in my endeavours to get closer to his tone, and despite the odd dalliance with other brands, I've always found myself going back to them.

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Posted (edited)

Sounds great to me, Duff Mckagan for me, because his tone to me is what I think of when I think of Rotosound, bright, cutting, ballsy tone, great bass lines and just a good solid player, nothing too fancy but melodic and tasteful, a great example is the opening bass run on sweet child o mine, immediately recognisable,a great bassline

Edited by markdavid

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Posted (edited)

Bruce Foxton for me. As well as having great tone many of his great bass lines are what people recognise the songs by, almost as much as the vocals, which is both very difficult and a talent in itself. Eton Rifles, Town Called Malice, Down In The Tube Station to name but a few. Great player with a great ear for melody and remember, he was only late teens/early twenties when he wrote many of those classic bass lines.

Edited by Lozz196
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Geddy Lee. Changed everything for me. Heard his amazing ‘corn flakes’ tone (you all know what I’m talking about) and bought my first bass the following week.

He’s been through countless amp/backline endorsements and s fair few bass manufacturers, but has always been a 66Swingbass player, as am I.

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I would normally say Geddy lee as he has been my all time favourite bass player, and probably more than anyone the reason I took up the bass but because of the music I am listening to now, I will go for Mr Nick Beggs, as he is in everything I am currently listening to! 

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Posted (edited)

Jean Jacques Burnel. 15 seconds into Hanging Around, and I knew I wanted to play bass. An epic bass tone that defined the band, and, for me, has still never been bettered. I've spent the last 35 years trying to get that sound juuuust right... 🙂

Edited by Muzz
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Mani - The Stone Roses were spellbinding in the way that they melded 1960s pop psychedelia and dub dance music. Mani’s bass lines were an intrinsic part of that sound - punchy, infectious and instantly familiar. His work with Primal Scream and Freebass wasn’t too shabby either. 

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Has to be Phil Lynott - one of the true greats when it comes to bass playing frontmen and an iconic bass that was easily recognisable. Thin Lizzy were ahead of their time and if it wasn't for Lynott holding down a solid rhythm section, the twin guitar attack could never have happened. 

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Think Billy Sheehan. Tried his signature set recently and really liked them, weird as they should’ve been too heavy for me. 

Still went back to 40-100’s.

although I’m lead to believe Mark King is using rotos again which would be my childhood hero bass player.

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Posted (edited)

Herbie Flowers. That Jazz bass with the black nylons on 'Walk On The Wild Side' does it for me.

I love the way he jumps about the high and low register with those little fills.

Edited by Hobbayne

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Jean Jacques Burnel is my favourite Rotosound endorsee. His tone sits right in the mix and also manages to rip your face off. 

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Great stuff so far people - do me a favour and share the competition of FB and so on if you can? 

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my favourite rotosound endorsee is Steve Harris for the unique way he writes and sounds within the Iron Maiden picture, and Mr Entwhistle for the introduction of the roundwound string  

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John Entwhistle, I appreciate he is no longer with us but he was at the conception of the roundwound string. The roundwound brought bass playing or at least the sound into the forefront of rock in a way that is hard to imagine these days where they are common place. So in a sense, John is still here with us today ringing out on every note of a roundwound string and it would be very nice to see a limited edition of Swing bass' strings with his picture on the packet as they did in the 70s

 

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Steve Harris is my favourite Rotosound endorsee, his big and punchy Precision sound with his trade mark clank is what drew the teenage me to the bass in the mid 80's and his tone still ranks as one of my favourite bass sounds to this day. He plays flats and I prefer round wounds but that's still the sound I try to emulate today, it just works with many forms of music, not just old school metal. 

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Hi there to all you BC members !

Yes lets hear about your favourite players famous and not so famous and I will look forward to showing you around the factory here in Sevenoaks to show you how the strings are made. I am sure you will find it interesting....

Here's a cool ad from the 1970's featuring a few more Rotosound artists !

Regards,

 

Jason How

RogerWaters.jpg

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When I think of great bass players and great sound, it's Duff McKagen that comes to mind. I love his tone, his playing, the way he cuts through such a massive amount of noise and he's a nice guy to boot! Knowing he plays RotoSounds makes me want to check them out!

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I'm fairly sure the late great Jaco Pastorius was a Rotosound endorser. He certainly used them and subsequently there was a set with different colour wraps dedicated to him. Why Jaco? Where to begin? Roto roundwounds on a fretless helped define his sound, flawless timing, great melodic awareness and masterful execution.

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Steve Harris.

Unmistakeable tone which has barely changed over the years thanks to his unique style and his unique strings. You always know it’s him :)

Honorary second place for Duff McKagen again due to a tone which has barely changed throughout his various bands and records.  

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All the players who buy them and stick with the Rotosound "sound" are endorsees.

You don't need to be a legend to play legendary strings.

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