Jump to content

Pleking with different gauge strings?


Tío

Recommended Posts

Should a bass or any other instrument be Pleked with the same gauge strings that will be used on the instrument?

I recently ordered a Sandberg TM4; Sandberg Pleks their basses and they come stock with 40-100 gauge and I plan on using 45-105 gauge.

Should I ask them to string it with my preferred gauge before Pleking? If so, shouldn’t they be asking me this question?

This may be splitting hairs, but I’m thinking that Pleking is supposed to be precise enough to to be splitting hairs.

Thanks,

Tio

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that the system excludes strings in the process, so you shouldn't be worried. After getting your instrument back you should restring it with a fresh set.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Judging by the above clip between 30 seconds and 1 minute, then yes it will matter what strings you choose, as it artificially similates string tension, which it says is important. 

 

How much difference different tension strings will make is another matter, but as you say, Plekking is all about the tiny differences. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, itu said:

I think that the system excludes strings in the process, so you shouldn't be worried. After getting your instrument back you should restring it with a fresh set.

I was under the impression that the Pleking machine took the initial measurements with the neck under string pressure to account for bow and warp that the pressure causes, and then makes the final adjustments without strings.

If this is true, then string gauge should make a difference on how it influences the neck.

How much????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a virtually new Sandberg TM5 with the original strings, and fitted my preferred 45 - 130 set. I did a full setup, although only small adjustments were necessary, and it plays superbly. You’re planning on a similar change in gauge so you should be OK. 

That said, there’s no harm is asking for your preferred strings to be fitted from new. Sandberg have a great reputation for customer service so they might be happy to do so. 

Edited by pineweasel
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't look like strings matter. If the neck is under tension then the neck is under tension.  It means that when you adjust the truss rod to a specific bow regardless of the gauge of strings used everything will be level.

 

That's my take on what it looks like to me although I have been known to talk utter sloblock from time to time 🥴

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to D’addario’s string tension chart, a set of 4 string Pro-Steels, for a 34” scale bass, exert the following pressures.

Gauge 40 to 100.        Gauge 45 to 105

40 = 33.8 lbs.              45 = 41.9 lbs

60 = 43.7 lbs.              65 = 47.3 lbs

80 = 40.5 lbs.              85 = 44.9 lbs

100 = 34.4 lbs.            105 = 37.3 lbs

______________________________________

Total 152.4 lbs.            171.4 lbs

       69.77 Kilos.           77.9 kilos

A 12.467% increase in total pressure from 40 - 100 gauge to 45 - 105 gauge.

 

With the 40 - 100 set; the combined pull of the G and D strings = 77.5 lbs or 35.22 kilos.

                                      The combined pull of the A and E strings = 74.9 lbs or 34 kilos.

This is approximately a 3.5 % more pressure on the high side compared to the low side.

 

With the 45 - 105 set; the combined pull of the G and D strings = 89.2 lbs or 40.45 kilos.

                                     the combined pull of the A and E strings = 82.2 lbs or 37.36 kilos. 

This is approximately an 8.5 % more pressure on the high side compared to the low side.

 

I’m no math wiz, and I only plugged in the numbers, and there are probably many more numbers to be plugged into this equation, but a total pressure increase of 12.467% from 40’s to 45’s and an 8.5% increase in tension from one side to the other for 45’s  compared to a 3.5% increase for 40’s, must somehow influence the neck as it’s Pleked.

Wether Pleking with the correct tension taken into account makes a real difference; I don’t know, but I’m convinced that Pleked is better not Plekes.

 

 

 

 



 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Tío said:

This may be splitting hairs, but I’m thinking that Pleking is supposed to be precise enough to to be splitting hairs.

There is your answer. If you're buying a Sandberg and changing the strings by that small amount, I really wouldn't worry. No harm asking them I suppose if they are building it for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny that nobody went to Plek directly where the whole process is clearly explained : https://plek.com/technology/

 

And here on their YouTube channel with the Plek technology clearly shown : 

 

 

I had a few basses pleked and it's a fantastic improvement, but the pleking is made under tension for the specific strings fitted. This means that for a perfect permanent setup, you have to fit exactly the same strings forever which clearly is the exact same manufacturer, the exact same gauge and the exact same material.

 

Putting different strings means different tensions (yes tensions, a plural), so not a so perfect setup. This difference in tensions may vary from neck to neck, so better tell (not ask) Sandberg to have your bass fitted with your exact strings and, only, then pleked.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So that probably means that most of us on the forum who change string tension/brand/roundwound/flatwound/tapewound with the weather are all screwed then and shouldn't bother 😀

 

I for one have never bought a bass and kept the same string gauge as was fitted. The closest I got was a bass fitted with EXL170 and I tend to use EXL165 when I'm using nickel roundwounds

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AFAIK, Sandberg only send their basses out with their own strings, mine came from the factory with 40-100 rounds and I only use flats, I changed them and it set up superbly with an incredible low action, no problem, but I did read, Plek technology scans your guitar's neck whilst strung up and tuned to pitch, allowing it to record the exact state of your fingerboard.

@Tío, it might be worth asking holger if you can send him your strings to fit, I was going to but my bass was made and shipped before I had a chance to ask 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, chris_b said:

I don't know anyone who resets the truss rod every time they change strings.

If I change to a different type or gauge of strings, I usually need to give the truss rod a tweak. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, EssentialTension said:

 

... and then there were two.

...and then there were 3.

 

I changed my strings yesterday on my Jazz type bass and tweaked the truss rod. The tension of the strings, new and old, were noticeably different and so was the neck relief. I ended up adjusting saddle height and intonation as well.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...