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Why should every Bass Player worship Status Quo?

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It is obviously highly opinionated question and I realize that not everyone has a shared interest for MOR rock.

But seriously, I think it relates their overwhelming consistency, which any of us who either are, or are aspiring to be, bass anchors, should admire.

Any confirmatory and/or contrary views may be appreciated, but be warned: I know I am right.

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34 minutes ago, Judo Chop said:

I don't know why should they?

That's what I am trying to find out, from more experienced musicians than me.

It's a bit like not being a scientist but knowing the sun rises in the west and sets in the east, you may kind of think it's true, but it's good to have a singular but specific why.☺️ 

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8 minutes ago, Downunderwonder said:

Seriously every bassist? Hell no, surely not serious.

Hell yes?!,

Think.. rythmic Beat.. think..endurance.

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Posted (edited)

A couple a decades ago now, I listened to part of a radio programme celebrating the xxx years of their career. A few anecdotes, some chat with the presenter, and, as a 'parting gift', they were to receive a special treat: the playing of their first hit. 'Pictures Of Matchstick Men'. One could hear, even on the radio, the cringing of the group as they had to endue the full three minutes thirty or whatever. After having lauded their guitar work, their tight signature rhythm section, their musicality... It was a real embarrassment.
Disclaimer: I've never been, myself, a fan of their stuff, having lived not far from the 'Rossi' roots of Hounslow, and having had the dubious pleasure of playing some of their stuff (on drums...) for a college concert. It's basic, it's primitive, it works, in the genre targeted, but I wouldn't give it house room, myself. There is, in my world, much better stuff to listen to. As for 'worship': that's meant jokingly, surely..?
Just my tuppence-worth. B|

Edited by Dad3353
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Considering how talented John Taylor is, shouldn't everyone worship Duran Duran, or how about The Cure, Gallup is amazing.

I recently started learning Come Undone, what a great bass arrangement!

Lost count of how many Cure songs I've learned, they're more my style, but I do like Duran Duran's darker period.

 

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11 minutes ago, Dad3353 said:


Disclaimer: I've never been, myself, a fan of their stuff, having lived not far from the 'Rossi' roots of Hounslow, and having had the dubious pleasure of playing some of their stuff (on drums...) for a college concert. It's basic, it's primitive, it works, in the genre targeted, but I wouldn't give it house room, myself. There is, in my world, much better stuff to listen to. As for 'worship': that's meant jokingly, surely..?
 

 

Not. I know some people have good taste, but I can only  go  by appearances - if you can bear it have a look at the attached video. Which band member is hardly in camera, but when he is: he looks like the daddy  in charge?

 

 

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3 hours ago, TJ1 said:

Hell yes?!,

Think.. rythmic Beat.. think..endurance.

Music is not a sport. By that token, you should worship a drum machine. It keeps a "rhythmic beat" and keeps on going for ever. 

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For those learning the relationship between bass and drums, the early combination of Lancaster & Coghlan was so consistent, solid and a great engine room. 
As a band  l know the lineup changes have divided their fans and as a fan in my youth. I didn’t really follow them, with the same intent from 86 onwards. Kept an eye on output but not as enthusiastically. I’ve been a member of QuoMotion for over 10 years. A guilty pleasure that has been great. We play a lot of festivals and the reaction to many of the early classic songs is incredible. So not sure about how significant they are for everyone, but they have a place in the choir. 

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3 hours ago, TJ1 said:

 

Not. I know some people have good taste, but I can only  go  by appearances - if you can bear it have a look at the attached video. Which band member is hardly in camera, but when he is: he looks like the daddy  in charge?

 

 

I was there for that, 13 years old. Brain off, steak and chips music, it was great. 

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Why should every bass player worship Status Quo?

Is it because of the BPM they can achieve? 🙄

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6 hours ago, TJ1 said:

Any confirmatory and/or contrary views may be appreciated, but be warned: I know I am right.

Outstanding work, sir!

In all fairness, it's not often that a Troll spells it out like this at the start of a Topic.

I look forward to your next effort at stirring up apathy.

:laugh1:

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13 minutes ago, Happy Jack said:

Outstanding work, sir!

In all fairness, it's not often that a Troll spells it out like this at the start of a Topic.

 

:laugh1:

Thank you, it did start off as troll like question: but then exploring it further it occurs that I might actually be practically or commercially/culturally correct on this topic.

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I do think there is a valid question in there. You could look at the work Cliff Williams does in AC/DC, Tommy Shannon with SRV and a host of other 'anchors' and wonder if the band would have been so good if they'd been John Entwistle or some other pointless noodler.

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5 hours ago, Killed_by_Death said:

 

Considering how talented John Taylor is, shouldn't everyone worship Duran Duran, or how about The Cure, Gallup is amazing.

I recently started learning Come Undone, what a great bass arrangement!

Lost count of how many Cure songs I've learned, they're more my style, but I do like Duran Duran's darker period.

 

Yes.  I am a massive metal head, it's pretty much all I listen to but Duran Duran creeps in a lot. Saw them live on their Wedding Album tour, JT's playing blew me away, became a fan boy from that.  As for the Cure, I learnt a lot about bass playing in my younger days listening to Staring at the Sea and Disintegration.  Fascination Street, A Forest, Primary - bass riffs for miles.

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No, no, no! Get your trolling right. It's Paul McCartney and/or, or vs., Mark King. AND only a sunburst Precision with tort pickguard. And Jaco only needed four. Not good for metal.

There you go. 9_9:P

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And flat wounds on the Precision @Silvia Bluejay...

That said why not worshipping someone playing the same thing for 30 years and more with just different names...

Could be a reason. 😎

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Interesting...I've so far gone thru many decades of existence without giving Status Quo a single moment's consideration... 

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13 minutes ago, Silvia Bluejay said:

No, no, no! Get your trolling right. It's Paul McCartney and/or, or vs., Mark King. AND only a sunburst Precision with tort pickguard. And Jaco only needed four. Not good for metal.

There you go. 9_9:P

Thanks - so it's the iconic figure  to the right of Frank Rossi in the Knebworth video above, or Jack Bruce of cream😉: A or B, no other.. Seriously...🙂

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ACDC wouldn't have been the band they were without Cliff Williams resisting the urge to Jaco all over the place, ditto Quo. One of my bandmates plays in probably the biggest Quo tribute on the circuit, the attendance and fan enthusiasm is something I'd kill for...

On the JT front, just for fun we kicked around Rio once in rehearsal with just me and the drummer, and the singer...it's 95% of the song, the bass line carries it all...fantastic...ditto Love Cats...

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Posted (edited)

Learned & played a Quo song or two when I started, age 16, wasn't much of a fan but my guitar playing mates were.

I suppose it was reasonable training in keeping time playing a root note 12 bar, but I can't say it exactly held my attention or inspired me as a bassist.

Don't know if it's true but I do remember reading that Alan Lancaster didn't play on Quo's recordings because he, erm, couldn't keep good time.

Edited by Bassassin
Potentially baseless anecdote.

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8 hours ago, TJ1 said:

 

But seriously, I think it relates their overwhelming consistency, which any of us who either are, or are aspiring to be, bass anchors, should admire.

Dear listener,

It takes a huge amount of discipline and concentration to play root note quavers over a 3-4 minute song, in time, with consistent tone, volume and “feel”.     Kenny Passarelli was the master of this if you’d care to listen to his playing on “Rock of theWesties” 

Dennis Chambers on Fagans Kamakeriad.

I dislike playing with musicians who can’t “sit” in a simple groove without slowing down, speeding up, changing volume or getting distracted by the voice in their heads saying “shiny! shiny! shiny! play something shiny!” 
So yes, Mr Lancaster and Coughlin are one of my favourite rhythm sections.

Yours steadily,
Kind regards,

Boring of Bath

 

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I liked the early RnB Quo period a lot.  When they first made the transition from psychodelic pop like Pictures of Matchstick Men, Like Ice In The Sun etc and started down the road of a heavy-ish blues rock.  I first saw them in, I think, 1972 when they had just released Paper Plane as a single.  They had already released the albums Ma Kelley's Greasy Spoon and Dog of Two Head, Piledriver was current.  I saw them live several times in the early to mid 70s and they were, at that time, fresh, energetic and playing RnB with a passion. 

The main issue I have is that within that rather limited format there is only so far you can explore.  Introduce a 4th chord now and then, perhaps.  And so by the time the band disintegrated and 'Big Al' left they had little left to give IMO - the more they became 'an institution' the more they became a parody of themselves and the more I lost interest.  But tunes like 'Don't Waste My Time' and 'Big Fat Mama' are fabulous driving rock n roll tunes IMO.

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Whatever the strengths and weaknesses of the individual members of Status Quo as musicians, they made it work as a band and the bass and drums made it chug along with the necessary swagger

. Back in their heyday of the 1970s  Quo were a formidable live act.  That was the real Status Quo, not the showbiz  bit of a joke household name version that came later. Quo back in the 70s were dangerous.A proper rock group. 

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