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Dan Dare

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Dan Dare last won the day on March 3 2019

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About Dan Dare

  • Birthday 22/11/1953

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    The Smoke

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  1. Tempting, but I'll pass, thanks 😊
  2. True, but a PJB Cab 47 will be easily the equivalent of most good quality 12s (their 7" drivers are more efficient and bigger sounding than their 5s). By the time OP has sold his cabs and bought replacements, he will be no better off.
  3. Terms such as "studio monitoring", "Studio Pro", etc are bandied about freely and mean little, as do good reviews from the cloth-eared on Amazon and YouTube, I'm afraid. They appear to be generic Chinese DJ cans with bling looks intended to impress. I'd stick to brands such as Beyer and Sennheiser. They have hard earned reputations to protect and aren't likely to risk losing them by selling tat. Superlux is a reputable company. They manufacture mic's for EV, among others.
  4. I think not. The device of "consistently repetitive (underlying) rhythm" is as old as music itself. It certainly didn't originate in early 20th century Europe. Try Africa.
  5. If you sell the 2x7 and keep the 4x7, you should have enough for small gigs. I don't think a 2x7 would cut it (I know PJB cabs are big sounding for their size - I have 5 of their 4x5s). As others say, why sell now? Prices for used kit are low at the moment because few have any gigs to speak of in the book. I've actually been buying stuff for less than I reckon it's worth.
  6. A similar experience is what led me to start carrying my own.
  7. Inevitable, really, although fair play to him for not doing the old comb over earlier in his career.
  8. To be fair, it's difficult not to spit a bit, especially when going for it.
  9. This. I've always taken my own vocal mic to gigs where there will be others singing. Nothing quite equals the, er, delight, of feeling that soggy dampness on the pop shield of a mic others have been using... In addition to carrying my preferred mic, I keep a SM58 in my bag. It's not my favourite vocal mic', but it does the job and makes it simple to change for the engineer as the chances are a vocal channel will be set up for one.
  10. Music is not a sport. By that token, you should worship a drum machine. It keeps a "rhythmic beat" and keeps on going for ever.
  11. Doesn't automatically mean he won't be loud of course 😁
  12. I read somewhere that workers at the Fender factory originally wrote dates on the necks/neck pockets of instruments. That was replaced with rubber stamping them when a buyer found a rude message written on one.
  13. Impossible to say without handling it, really. Looks OK, but not possible to see anything in detail in the photos. Have a look inside the upper F hole for the label. Could be cheap because they are not as popular as solid Gibsons. They have limited tonal options - they do the old string bass thump quite well, but clarity is not their forte and they can be prone to feedback if you try to push the volume. I'd be on the lookout for physical issues - neck stability and cracks in the body, especially - given their light construction. If you get it, stick to lighter gauge strings. Some useful info here - The Gibson EB2 bass guitar >> FlyGuitars.
  14. You mention PJB. I like their cabs a lot (I have 5). A C4 would be good for the uses you describe - practice at home and with a musical drummer and the occasional gig in a coffeeshop, church or small other setting. It's a 12 inch cube, although not the lightest cab in the world and capable of surprising volume. I would advise trying them before buying, unless it's really impossible.
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