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Is Giles Martin doing a remix in the same way as he did for Sgt Pepper, White Album and Abbey Road to co-incide with this release?

On the other hand, George Martin had nothing to do with the original album (Athough he features in the above video)

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The footage is amazing, and I can't wait for it, too.

Something I find fascinating is the jarring contrast in clothes - on one hand you have George and Ringo clinging on to the tail-end of psychedelia, and Paul and John who we're heading down the rustic Woodstock woodsman route. It's a real watershed.

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5 minutes ago, Hobbayne said:

On the other hand, George Martin had nothing to do with the original album (Athough he features in the above video)

Let It Be? He's all over it.

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1 hour ago, wateroftyne said:

Let It Be? He's all over it.

I thought they gave it to Phil Spector to produce?

Maybe they might let him out on licence to remix it. :P

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Just now, Hobbayne said:

I thought they gave it to Phil Spector to produce?

Maybe they might let him out on licence to remix it. :P

George recorded a lot of it (and played on some of it).

They brought Phil in after a while to do a big curly poo on it.

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1 hour ago, wateroftyne said:

Let It Be? He's all over it.

Glyn Johns tells a different story (Sound Man, 2014). He says that Macca called him out of the blue and asked him to produce a TV special they were planning, to be filmed/recorded at Twickenham. George Martin was essentially fed up with the band's pre-collapse antics and wanted nothing to do with it.

The TV thing never happened, and the project morphed into the Let It Be project that we all ... erm ... have mixed feelings about, shot at Twickenham and at Apple HQ in Savile Row.

The reason George Martin got involved was that Lennon and Harrison had been completely fooled by Magic Alex (look him up if you're not familiar with the name) into paying for a sooper-dooper sound system that Alex was to install at Savile Row. Come the first session there, the recording professionals were wetting themselves laughing at a teenager's home stereo.

The Beatles called George Martin at Abbey Road, and he quickly shipped down to Savile Row enough kit to complete the project. That's why Martin appears in the montage; he wasn't producing, he was keeping an eye on his kit!

The Phil Spector thing happened later, entirely at Lennon's demand, and without Macca even being consulted. What he did to the production on the album was genuinely the final straw that broke the relationship between Lennon and Macartney. Personally, my sympathy is entirely with Macca - Lennon was so far out of order that I would never have been prepared to work with him again.

Over the last nearly 50 years the stories have twisted and turned, and many have tried to make Macca the villain of the piece. Unfortunately for them, pretty much all the evidence (and I've waded through a LOT of it) simply confirms and re-confirms that Macca was right all along, while smack-head Lennon was making a series of appalling decisions.

 

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1 hour ago, Happy Jack said:

The Beatles called George Martin at Abbey Road, and he quickly shipped down to Savile Row enough kit to complete the project. That's why Martin appears in the montage; he wasn't producing, he was keeping an eye on his kit!

 

Just double-checked that in Martin's book (All You Need Is Ears, 1979) and he points out that he had in fact already left EMI (and therefore Abbey Road) at this point and was now running Air Studios. So the equipment he had lent to The Beatles was kit that he had himself borrowed on their behalf from EMI. No wonder he wanted to keep an eye on it.

 

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1 hour ago, Happy Jack said:

Glyn Johns tells a different story (Sound Man, 2014). He says that Macca called him out of the blue and asked him to produce a TV special they were planning, to be filmed/recorded at Twickenham. George Martin was essentially fed up with the band's pre-collapse antics and wanted nothing to do with it.

The TV thing never happened, and the project morphed into the Let It Be project that we all ... erm ... have mixed feelings about, shot at Twickenham and at Apple HQ in Savile Row.

The reason George Martin got involved was that Lennon and Harrison had been completely fooled by Magic Alex (look him up if you're not familiar with the name) into paying for a sooper-dooper sound system that Alex was to install at Savile Row. Come the first session there, the recording professionals were wetting themselves laughing at a teenager's home stereo.

The Beatles called George Martin at Abbey Road, and he quickly shipped down to Savile Row enough kit to complete the project. That's why Martin appears in the montage; he wasn't producing, he was keeping an eye on his kit!

The Phil Spector thing happened later, entirely at Lennon's demand, and without Macca even being consulted. What he did to the production on the album was genuinely the final straw that broke the relationship between Lennon and Macartney. Personally, my sympathy is entirely with Macca - Lennon was so far out of order that I would never have been prepared to work with him again.

Over the last nearly 50 years the stories have twisted and turned, and many have tried to make Macca the villain of the piece. Unfortunately for them, pretty much all the evidence (and I've waded through a LOT of it) simply confirms and re-confirms that Macca was right all along, while smack-head Lennon was making a series of appalling decisions.

 

I haven't done any of the research on it like you have Jack, but my sense of it has always been that Macca has had a raw deal over the years from the mainly pro-Lennon press.. Something that took on an even more zealous edge after Lennon was assassinated.. 

Come the day that Macca is no longer here, I suspect that the history of it all will get rewritten more fairly and Macca's unbelievablely brilliant contribution to music / culture over the last 60 years will finally get the proper recognition it - and he - deserves. 

 

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Great quality and i could look at the gear and the background all day but i seem to be in a minority in not enjoying then just goof everytime the camera shows up .Couldn't do 2 hours .

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Just now, jazzmanb said:

Couldn't do 2 hours .

Could be worse ... you could be watching the original film again.

Possibly the most depressing 81 minutes I ever spent.

 

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The craziness of The Musicians (I mean ALL of us) is that no matter how much we may hate each other's guts when it comes down to playing in the same room at the same time we can't help but enjoy it. Music does that. Fripp would say the music came down and played US. Being a child and teenager during The Beatles era I only know how the music affected me, not what the guys were like or the personal interactions. And I either liked or didn't like the music - I was definitly a "pick&choose" fan from beginning to end. Except for the white album. That blew my mind from start to finish. So I never put 'em on a pedestal. I've had to go back to figure out (academically) what was what I liked about them. I think most of it was the passion they brought to it. Again, that's something you can't fake or manufacture....Looking forward to it either way I find it (now) fascinating.

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21 hours ago, wateroftyne said:

...or not 😄

Maybe not a generation. Definitely how I learned how to be in a band.

Blue

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1 hour ago, Bluewine said:

Maybe not a generation. Definitely how I learned how to be in a band.

Blue

I think more than a generation.

What I mean is that they also wrote a pretty authoritative guide on how to break up a band.

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And on that, given that PJ is an experienced film-maker, here's some foreshadowing - Paul and John having a laugh, but look at Yoko's face...she has her chair pulled up to John, right in front of him...

image.thumb.png.a32fd18fcf7bd33414024fba66beb630.png

Edited by Muzz
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1 hour ago, Muzz said:

And on that, given that PJ is an experienced film-maker, here's some foreshadowing - Paul and John having a laugh, but look at Yoko's face...she has her chair pulled up to John, right in front of him...

image.thumb.png.a32fd18fcf7bd33414024fba66beb630.png

Once John hooked up with Yoko so intensely he had found his new soulmate and had no need for the other three guys.

In fact, nine months later, Lennon quit the band.

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10 hours ago, StickyDBRmf said:

The craziness of The Musicians (I mean ALL of us) is that no matter how much we may hate each other's guts when it comes down to playing in the same room at the same time we can't help but enjoy it. Music does that. 

Probably the exception that proves the rule. But I would never sit in a room and play music with people I don't like. 

For me the magic comes (and always has) from playing with a group of people who are first and foremost friends, and musicians second. Admittedly it's severely limited my options over the years, but I couldn't imagine putting the time and effort into rehearsing with someone I don't like. I appreciate it's different for professional musicians, we all have to work with people we might not like. But why would anyone spend their hobby time with someone they don't like? 

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12 minutes ago, Newfoundfreedom said:

Probably the exception that proves the rule. But I would never sit in a room and play music with people I don't like. 

For me the magic comes (and always has) from playing with a group of people who are first and foremost friends, and musicians second. Admittedly it's severely limited my options over the years, but I couldn't imagine putting the time and effort into rehearsing with someone I don't like. I appreciate it's different for professional musicians, we all have to work with people we might not like. But why would anyone spend their hobby time with someone they don't like? 

plenty of bands hated each other, or got to hate each other, but were still capable of producing the magic on stage.

Fleetwood Mac spring to mind...

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4 minutes ago, MacDaddy said:

 or got to hate each other, 

 

this is more likely, it's very hard to stay 'mates' with someone when when band 'personalities' become more and more of a problem, and if you're on tour and living in each other pockets it's pretty much impossible I would imagine

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This is is a sad picture. One year later  -  Jan 1970, The Beatles are finished.

Macca records his debut solo album at home.

He borrows Ringos drum kit, as the famous drum head lies forelornly on the floor, no longer required. :sad:

 

78486759_2633010426819148_7189062486501359616_o.jpg

Edited by Hobbayne
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7 minutes ago, PaulWarning said:

this is more likely, it's very hard to stay 'mates' with someone when when band 'personalities' become more and more of a problem . . . .

If being in a band is the equivalent of playing a round of golf then OK, but this is why IMO it's usually preferable to keep friends and band members separate if you are more serious about being a musician.

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1 hour ago, Newfoundfreedom said:

Probably the exception that proves the rule. But I would never sit in a room and play music with people I don't like. 

For me the magic comes (and always has) from playing with a group of people who are first and foremost friends, and musicians second. Admittedly it's severely limited my options over the years, but I couldn't imagine putting the time and effort into rehearsing with someone I don't like. I appreciate it's different for professional musicians, we all have to work with people we might not like. But why would anyone spend their hobby time with someone they don't like? 

I think if you the member of a band whose album you were recording was likely to sell as well as "Let It Be" did, your attitude might not be the same. I know mine wouldn't.

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