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Neil Peart RIP

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Saw them MP at Deeside Leisure Centre. Couldn’t hear a note Alex played all night. It was all Geddy’s Ric, which was fine by me. 😉

Saw them on the Roll the Bones tour too (still couldn’t hear Alex!), I think at Sheffield? Primus supported and blew my head off.

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5 minutes ago, 4000 said:

Saw them MP at Deeside Leisure Centre. Couldn’t hear a note Alex played all night. It was all Geddy’s Ric, which was fine by me. 😉

Saw them on the Roll the Bones tour too (still couldn’t hear Alex!), I think at Sheffield? Primus supported and blew my head off.

Primus were particularly loud on that tour lol

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2 minutes ago, White Cloud said:

Primus were particularly loud on that tour lol

 

8 minutes ago, 4000 said:

Saw them MP at Deeside Leisure Centre. Couldn’t hear a note Alex played all night. It was all Geddy’s Ric, which was fine by me. 😉

 

I did too! Permanent Waves tour... Awesome! Saw Yes there too a little after on the Drama tour. Great gig.

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3 hours ago, dmccombe7 said:

If you go onto Rush website they have all their gigs sorted out in tours and different years. 

Bingley Hall was 29th & 30th Oct 1981and was the Exit Stage Left Tour.

Their Moving Pictures tour the previous year was all US & Canada. See the link below it makes for some interesting reading They've done some unbelievable tours over the years

https://www.rush.com/tour/exit-stage-left/

I saw the Moving Pictures tour and the Stafford/Brum show was the NEC I think. I attended it and it was so exciting...

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7 minutes ago, visog said:

 

I did too! Permanent Waves tour... Awesome! Saw Yes there too a little after on the Drama tour. Great gig.

Sorry just remembered - Quartz supporting the Rush?

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39 minutes ago, 4000 said:

Saw them MP at Deeside Leisure Centre. Couldn’t hear a note Alex played all night. It was all Geddy’s Ric, which was fine by me. 😉

 

Yep - that's where I saw them.

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37 minutes ago, dmccombe7 said:

 

It says 1981 was the Exit Stage Left tour but just wondering if that's the year they recorded it as its the live album and i know Closer To the Heart was recorded in Edinburgh 1981. That was Nov 8th 1981 and def Moving Pictures tour as i have the programme from that gig. 

Its the only reason i can think off. I guess its what the band called it as its the album they were working on that particular tour 

CTTH was recorded at the Glasgow Apollo in 1980, on the PW tour. My ex-other half was part of the "Glasgow Chorus" credited in the ESL sleeve notes!

I didn't see them on that tour - became a fan slightly too late to get a ticket for the 5 nights they played at the Hammy O. I do regret never having seen them in a smaller venue than the arenas they were booking from MP/ESL onwards.

The 1981 Ingliston gig was my second-ever Rush show - it was technically the ESL tour as they'd just released that album, but programmes, merch & the set were all the same as MP. Apart from the sneaky rendition of the as-yet unrecorded Subdivisions...

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4 minutes ago, Bassassin said:

 

The 1981 Ingliston gig was my second-ever Rush show - it was technically the ESL tour as they'd just released that album, but programmes, merch & the set were all the same as MP. Apart from the sneaky rendition of the as-yet unrecorded Subdivisions...

Did Geddy play the Steinberger at Ingliston?

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1 hour ago, White Cloud said:

Primus were particularly loud on that tour lol

I meant more in terms of being awesome. 😁 I actually much preferred them to Rush that night (shhhhhh! I didn’t say that!).

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47 minutes ago, White Cloud said:

Did Geddy play the Steinberger at Ingliston?

I don't think so but I couldn't swear to it - it was a long time ago! He definitely played it on the '83 Signals tour.

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22 minutes ago, 4000 said:

I meant more in terms of being awesome. 😁 I actually much preferred them to Rush that night (shhhhhh! I didn’t say that!).

I've got to be honest, as good as they were, I wasnt particularly enamoured by Rush on that tour whilst, on the other hand Primus were on fire.

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21 minutes ago, Bassassin said:

I don't think so but I couldn't swear to it - it was a long time ago! He definitely played it on the '83 Signals tour.

I loved the Steinberger tone

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9 hours ago, White Cloud said:

Primus were particularly loud on that tour lol

I have been at gigs where the sound has been fantastic, then spoken to people that were at the same gig but sitting somewhere else and have said the sound was rotten. Venues can have different characteristics depending on where you plonk yourself.

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I was an occasional listener. They were certainly very good musicians. 
 

I prefer their roll the bones era music, which is the period when I was introduced to their music.

I wasn’t to keen on their more recent music, and never liked their earlier music at all. Apparently their 2112 album was based on the writings of Ayn Rand, who was a pro-ultra right wing writer. 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/13/rush-nme-interview-1978-rocks-backpages?fbclid=IwAR0QircyeWOvyTCZpnwoim3CZBpJvSvz6ELVom8xmdUsK4zzEfc4uNPiBHc

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13 minutes ago, ambient said:

I was an occasional listener. They were certainly very good musicians. 
 

I prefer their roll the bones era music, which is the period when I was introduced to their music.

I wasn’t to keen on their more recent music, and never liked their earlier music at all. Apparently their 2112 album was based on the writings of Ayn Rand, who was a pro-ultra right wing writer. 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/13/rush-nme-interview-1978-rocks-backpages?fbclid=IwAR0QircyeWOvyTCZpnwoim3CZBpJvSvz6ELVom8xmdUsK4zzEfc4uNPiBHc

This will not be news to many people.

Here's Neil's take on it from 2012.

Quote

This is somewhat random, but you were interested in the writings of Ayn Rand decades ago. Do her words still speak to you?

Oh, no. That was 40 years ago. But it was important to me at the time in a transition of finding myself and having faith that what I believed was worthwhile. I had come up with that moral attitude about music, and then in my late teens I moved to England to seek fame and fortune and all that, and I was kind of stunned by the cynicism and the factory-like atmosphere of the music world over there, and it shook me. I’m thinking, “Am I wrong? Am I stupid and naïve? This is the way that everybody does everything and, had I better get with the program?”

For me, it was an affirmation that it’s all right to totally believe in something and live for it and not compromise. It was a simple as that. On that 2112 album, again, I was in my early twenties. I was a kid. Now I call myself a bleeding heart libertarian. Because I do believe in the principles of Libertarianism as an ideal – because I’m an idealist. Paul Theroux’s definition of a cynic is a disappointed idealist. So as you go through past your twenties, your idealism is going to be disappointed many many times. And so, I’ve brought my view and also – I’ve just realized this – Libertarianism as I understood it was very good and pure and we’re all going to be successful and generous to the less fortunate and it was, to me, not dark or cynical. But then I soon saw, of course, the way that it gets twisted by the flaws of humanity. And that’s when I evolve now into . . . a bleeding heart Libertarian. That’ll do.

Source.

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Styx were playing a gig a few nights ago and Larry Gowan did a nice little tribute :

 

 

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24 minutes ago, ambient said:

I was an occasional listener. They were certainly very good musicians. 
 

I prefer their roll the bones era music, which is the period when I was introduced to their music.

I wasn’t to keen on their more recent music, and never liked their earlier music at all. Apparently their 2112 album was based on the writings of Ayn Rand, who was a pro-ultra right wing writer. 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/13/rush-nme-interview-1978-rocks-backpages?fbclid=IwAR0QircyeWOvyTCZpnwoim3CZBpJvSvz6ELVom8xmdUsK4zzEfc4uNPiBHc

And here's what NP said a year later on the subject of that interview:

https://rushvault.com/2011/08/29/excerpt-may-5-1979-nme-interview-with-neil/

Everyone is allowed to have different politics in their youth. In 1977, Paul Weller told a music fanzine that he and the band would "all be voting Conservative at the next election". He'd changed his mind by '79 and some years later he claimed he'd only said that to shock people. People change and so do their beliefs. I know that 2020 me shudders at the thought of some of what 1978 me used to think.

Edited by Rich
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Careful - we may wind up in politics-land if we pursue this line of discussion - and we all know what happens then, don't we... :D

But yes - for long-standing Rush fans,the Ayn Rand controversy was something that defined the band - and Peart in particular - in the rabidly hard-left world of the late 70s/early 80s music press. All of which derived from that NME hatchet-job, written at a time when playing prog rock was a contender for the most reviled human behaviour in history.

As an apolitical teen, Peart's political-ish allegories inspired me to read & understand a little. I did read Ayn Rand - (2112 was directly based on a novella called Anthem) and found her writing dense, stilted and unrealistic. I read all of her novels and two of her philosophical essays, and my takeaway from it (at age 19 or so) was less that she was pro- what we would call "right-wing" but was rabidly, vehemently anti-collectivist, likely as a consequence of her childhood during the Russian revolution.

From the perspective of 35-odd years later, I wonder how differently her work would read now, particularly with me having turned out to be a proper lefty snowflake bedwetter... :)

Edited by Bassassin
clariteee
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Mr Peart was one of the few famous people that would be interesting enough to sit and have a chat with. Obviously he liked his privacy but he had some interesting and worthwhile views on life.

Rush have never been full of themselves like many other bands when they became famous. They've always appreciated their fans and what they've done for Rush. 

Still can't get over this. So so sad.

Like the lyrics from my fav Rush song Bravado :-

"And if the music stops
There's only the sound of the rain"

Dave

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3 minutes ago, Bassassin said:

Careful - we may wind up in politics-land if we pursue this line of discussion - and we all know what happens then, don't we... :D

But yes - for long-standing Rush fans,the Ayn Rand controversy was something that defined the band - and Peart in particular - in the rabidly hard-left world of the late 70s/early 80s music press. All of which derived from that NME hatchet-job, written at a time when playing prog rock was a contender for the most reviled human behaviour in history.

As an apolitical teen, Peart's political-ish allegories inspired me to read & understand a little. I did read Ayn Rand - (2112 was directly based on a novella called Anthem) and found her writing dense, stilted and unrealistic. I read all of her novels and two of her political essays, and my takeaway from it (at age 19 or so) was less that she was pro- what we would call "right-wing" but was rabidly, vehemently anti-collectivist, likely as a consequence of her childhood during the Russian revolution.

From the perspective of 35-odd years later, I wonder how differently her work would read now, particularly with me having turned out to be a proper lefty snowflake bedwetter... :)

 

31 minutes ago, Rich said:

And here's what NP said a year later on the subject of that interview:

https://rushvault.com/2011/08/29/excerpt-may-5-1979-nme-interview-with-neil/

Everyone is allowed to have different politics in their youth. In 1977, Paul Weller told a music fanzine that he and the band would "all be voting Conservative at the next election". He'd changed his mind by '79 and some years later he claimed he'd only said that to shock people. People change and so do their beliefs. I know that 2020 me shudders at the thought of some of what 1978 me used to think.

It’s actually quite at odds with the impression I had from listening to their 1980s music, which was my introduction to them. In that they’re anti-war and pro-environmental. It’s the road of life isn’t it? Full of twists and turns, and wrong turnings.

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3 minutes ago, dmccombe7 said:

Mr Peart was one of the few famous people that would be interesting enough to sit and have a chat with. Obviously he liked his privacy but he had some interesting and worthwhile views on life.

Rush have never been full of themselves like many other bands when they became famous. They've always appreciated their fans and what they've done for Rush. 

Still can't get over this. So so sad.

Like the lyrics from my fav Rush song Bravado :-

"And if the music stops
There's only the sound of the rain"

Dave

That’s actually my favourite Rush song too. There’s a nice live version of that on live in Rio.

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6 minutes ago, dmccombe7 said:

Mr Peart was one of the few famous people that would be interesting enough to sit and have a chat with. Obviously he liked his privacy but he had some interesting and worthwhile views on life.
 

 

Oh yes, very definitely one of those 'fantasy dinner guests'.

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