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Pronunciations


Rich

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Eden amp aren't called David Eden.  The cabs were called the David series. 

1 hour ago, toneknob said:

 

Slightly off topic but what surprised me recently was cymbal manufacturer Paiste. Pie Stee!

It always annoyed me when drummers called them 'Paste'.

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7 minutes ago, toneknob said:

Aguilar is either

Agg Wee Lar OR

Uh Gwee Lar

 

definitely got a wee in there either way

Dave Boonshoft himself pronounces it Ag-wee-lar.

Edited by 40hz
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2 hours ago, Rich said:

There's a few manufacturers with names that are open to a range of different pronunciations. Here's a few with my interpretations, and I'd appreciate corrections if anyone has any.

Wal - I used to think it rhymed with 'pal', but then I heard Pete the Fish rhyme it with 'doll' so I guessed that must be correct.

Sei - I've heard it variously pronounced as 'say' and 'sigh'. I'm 90% sure it's the former, but I'm fully expecting to be 100% wrong.

Lakland - from what I understand, it's 'lake-' rather than 'lack-'. Yes..?

Maruszczyk - I'm reliably informed that it's 'maroosh-chick', I hope that's right because whenever anyone asks what make my gorgeous strap is, that's what I tell them. Knowing my luck it's probably pronounced 'eggbox' or something.

Babicz - OK, definitely stumbling in the dark a bit here. I'm guessing at 'ba-bítch'..?

Mayones - is it 'may-owns'? Or 'mayo-ness'?

Sadowsky - I'm assuming 'sad-of-ski', yes? 

 

Anyone else got any other pispronounced worms?

 

 

They’re all pronounced
”can’t afford it”

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2 minutes ago, chris_b said:

Ag-u-lar - as pronounced by Dave Boonshoft, ex owner of Aguilar.

I'm going to have to watch the Aguilar videos again! . . 

 

Oh crap! 

 

He says Ag-ya-lar on the cab video on their YouTube channel.

Edited by 40hz
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Roger Sadowsky told me his family is of Polish origin, so his name should, in theory, be pronounced 'sadovski' (with the stress on the 'o'). He himself says Sa-dow-ski and I'm fine with that.

 

D'Addario is pronounced Daddahrio (Italian surname).

 

Di Marzio is pronounced Deemartsio (other Italian surname)

 

Fodera pronounce their name with the stress on the 'e' but, in theory, the Italian surname should be stressed on the 'o'. I prefer the former.

 

Aguilar - Dave Boonshoft was impressed at my Spanish pronunciation ('agheelarr' with the stress on the last syllable), but said that that was the (Mexican) surname of his former business partner, with whom he no longer works, and as time went by he got to accept the Americanisation.

 

At least Bartolini is - well - 'bartolini' (other Italian surname)... 9_9😄

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On 15/03/2022 at 14:29, Cato said:

With regards to the basses I they're probably getting it right.

 

I live quite near Warwick and back in the day hearing Americans say War Wick castle was an endless source of amusement to me and my school mates.

 

It was years before I realised that without prior knowledge there's no way in the world anyone's going to guess that the second 'w' is silent.


I can empathise with that - for anyone living in the Midlands in the 60s/70s, and with the hordes of US visitors to the area around Stratford, there were many irregular pronunciations to be sniggered at, including War Wick - and why not, hordes of our country folk have long taken the mickey out of some Midlands pronunciations (both East and West Midlands).

 

However it seems the Americans have, at times taken this to a new level - a couple of examples:-

 

Wal bass (Wall bass)

Rickenbacker (variously Rickenbarker; Rickenbocker) 

 

There was a long running thread on Talkbass arguing how Rickenbacker should be pronounced.
 

However having seen the Friends episode when they exclaimed ‘Happy Honikah Monica’ I could see where the problem lay 😀

Edited by drTStingray
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1 hour ago, Rich said:

 

 

I've seen people arguing that it's 'EE-ban-yeth' too. God only knows. It'd be nice to know how the company say it!

 

I've Spanish family and they pronounce their surname EE-ban-yeth, but I can't stop calling the brand eye-ban-ez!

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I bought a Hartke bass for $30US and tore the frets out. Then the P pu went out so it only has the J. (Wadda ya want fer $30?) I blacked out the H and ke with a Sharpie so now itsa "art" bass...problem solved...

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This thread reminds me every time someone talks about Paella ( pronouncing it British way). I usually respond: never heard of it, others: you never had paella, me: no idea what that is......and when they explain the dish , me without being difficult ( although finding it amusing)  , I say , or you mean Paella ( Spanish pronunciation) 

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38 minutes ago, SH73 said:

This thread reminds me every time someone talks about Paella ( pronouncing it British way). I usually respond: never heard of it, others: you never had paella, me: no idea what that is......and when they explain the dish , me without being difficult ( although finding it amusing)  , I say , or you mean Paella ( Spanish pronunciation) 

 

isn't paella pronounced differently in northern Spain and in southern spain?

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11 minutes ago, EssentialTension said:

 

isn't paella pronounced differently in northern Spain and in southern spain?

I've no idea as long as it has a variety of seafood in it.

But Škoda is finally pronounced correctly in commercials, as Š is pronounced as sh.

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...it.

 

But that misses the obvious point - how a word is pronounced in its home country in its own language is not necessarily how it is pronounced in English, particularly in this imstance as English does not have an equivalent to the caron over the S in Skoda. 

 

That does not make those that do so automatically incorrect. It just illustrates that due to linguistic differences not every word either trnaslates exactly or would normally be pronounced exactly.

 

Therefore, Skoda with no SH sound is actually equally correct when spoken by an English speaker.

Edited by Bassfinger
Keeping my hands warm on the HRW
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