Jump to content
ped

Rotosound Competition!!

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

My bassist of choice is Dennis Dunaway, bassist for Alice Cooper. Listening to those very present, yet so well balanced, flawlessly played bass lines, is a real treat, time after time.

Edited by Jay2U
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/07/2019 at 09:41, bumnote said:

For those of us who are a certain age, -Jet Harris.

Also for some who are not of a certain age! I wasn't born until the 70s and didn't listen to The Shadows until the late 80s but they were an important influence, eventually getting me going in the direction of jazz.
Stuff like this was awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, knirirr said:

Also for some who are not of a certain age! I wasn't born until the 70s and didn't listen to The Shadows until the late 80s but they were an important influence, eventually getting me going in the direction of jazz.
Stuff like this was awesome.

Still played at my local shadows club

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Jay2U said:

My bassist of choice is Dennis Dunaway, bassist for Alice Cooper. Listening to those very present, yet so well balanced, flawlessly played bass lines, is a real treat, time after time.

Funnily enough I was noodling around with Halo Of Flies yesterday.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, prowla said:

Funnily enough I was noodling around with Halo Of Flies yesterday.

 

I listened to this song a while ago and rediscovered that epic bass.

Edited by Jay2U

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, knirirr said:
On 20/07/2019 at 10:41, bumnote said:

For those of us who are a certain age, -Jet Harris.

Also for some who are not of a certain age! I wasn't born until the 70s and didn't listen to The Shadows until the late 80s but they were an important influence, eventually getting me going in the direction of jazz.
Stuff like this was awesome.

Does anyone else remember the 'interlude' the BBC used to use of the Shadows playing Apache - curiously dressed as cavemen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaco Pastorius

I wouldn't say that I'm biggest fan of Jaco's music, in fact of the list of Rotosound's endorsee' there are many more I would choose to listen to.  That being said I do think Continuum is a lovely composition and some of his work with Joni Mitchell on Hejira was fantastic.

However the reason I nominated him is I remember reading when I first picked up bass playing that he had a different colour silk wrap for each string.  He saw notes as colours and wanted that represented within his bass - as a newbie to bass playing I really liked this connection between music and colours and it's stuck with me ever since.  Now I'm a few years on in my bass journey I'm starting to play more funk I recognise Jaco's contribution to the evolution of the instrument and how the 16th note grooves he famed for have inspired so many of the players that subsequently inspire me.

 

jaco_strings.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ME, as I use them to grate that very old Parmigiano. The local farmer use them to cut his cow's horns. And I will recommend them to my wife's sister, who is a medical pedicure, so when the electricity has gone, she will be able to finish the sanding work. 🤔 🤣 :crazy:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it's got to be Steve Harris from Iron Maiden. The person who made me want to pick up a bass guitar at 15, and still inspires me now at 45. His playing has been consistent through all those years, and his sound and style is unmistakable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not into Iron Maiden from ages, but Steve Harris signature sound is unique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug Wimbish, because of his versatility. He has been a super in-demand sessions guy. There's a reason why, he can lay down some serious grooves. Check out his playing on Living Colour's "Wall". 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favourite is Geedy Lee , of course . Because he´s the first bassplayer 
that i wanted to transcribe and play a music  when i was
learning the firsts notes on the instrument =). The song "By thor & the snow dog"  😲

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/07/2019 at 19:17, hihat said:

Doug Wimbish, because of his versatility. He has been a super in-demand sessions guy. There's a reason why, he can lay down some serious grooves. Check out his playing on Living Colour's "Wall". 

 

Truuuuue! Maybe I should've mentioned him instead.... Humm... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it has to be Jaco Pastorius. Not only for all he did to inspire people to pick up and play bass, but also fretless bass. For his creativity and expressiveness in making the bass talk to you with his melodic runs, harmonics and chords. All of this which was captured with his recognisable and famous tone. A huge influence and impact of the bass community and future generation of bassist.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, it has to be Chris Squire. He is one of the reasons I became a bass player. He was never afraid to bunk tradition and use all the fretboard and play his bass like a lead guitar. His tone was very bright, even when playing lower register notes. Sadly missed but never forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J.J. burnel. Not just different. Better !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve Harris for me. His sound attracted me to the instrument when I was at college; galloping, clanky, aggressive tone, always driving the song. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herbie Flowers.. the man’s discography is UNBELIEVABLE. A gentleman and pioneer of double electric and TUBA! from walk on the wild side to war of the worlds via T-Rex and Labi Sifri. I’m very lucky to have played both his basses as part of one of his bands and the tone of his rotosounds on upright and electric is fundamental to decades of session bass playing. Still playing like a hero in his 80’s.. still using rotos! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Andrea Goldsworthy (Paloma Faith) for the round sound and the way she fits the sound of the bass to the band.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Jean Jacques Burnel for me. He’s used Swing Bass for as long as I have been playing bass and it’s kinda etched into my mind now so that I just buy multipacks of Rotosound Rotobass and re-string every new bass that comes through my door. His bass playing is unique and aggressive but melodic and punchy without being too twangy, that’s a good basis for my own bass explorations. Tough too, they can take a lot of hard playing. I know what I like and I’m not going anywhere.

I always carry a set of 45/65/85/105s in each bag, (as essential as fresh knickers and anti-social “go away” earbuds.)

8F63CDEE-A546-475A-AFE0-EFCD2CEF754C.thumb.jpeg.1579966921cd23893068c78e4fd865fa.jpeg

Edited by PunkPonyPrincess
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, as for many others, it's John Entwistle. He changed the sound of bass forever and a big part of that is due to roundwound rotosound bass strings. His tone and playing made an indelible impact on everything after it and I don't think rock music would be the same without that partnership.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Dosi Y'Anarchy said:

For me, as for many others, it's John Entwistle. He changed the sound of bass forever and a big part of that is due to roundwound rotosound bass strings. His tone and playing made an indelible impact on everything after it and I don't think rock music would be the same without that partnership.

I think I agree, it has to be John Entwistle.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Billy Sheehan. I've learned a lot from his playing, not necessarily the widdly stuff, but being the bass player in a band. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...