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danbowskill

Thomann prices?

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Oh yes, this is a small vs big thing. If you are a big business it is just an overhead to work out, like so many, just get someone to deal with it. If you are a small business, you just don't have the capacity. In the context of this thread, the Thommans will be ok, it's just the little guy.

I am sure it will help Amazon greatly

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In my experience small businesses are more nimble and able to adapt quicker to changes in the business landscape. Of course, there are some big businesses who are good at this too. So I don't see a skew towards larger firms (rich get richer etc).

Its also diluting the point that we probably agree on though - that while yes an EU trade deal was done, it was done so late in 2020 that its left very little time for businesses to adapt for the changes. Resulting in firms like Thomann unable to update their systems on time, so that people can buy a bass on 2nd Jan and have it shipped to the UK. Its all a bit of a mess.

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6 minutes ago, AxelF said:

Classic example of people only wanting an echo chamber that reflects their own beliefs back at them.

In my opinion the biggest issue with society in this country (and probably others too) is the prevalence of 'news' media that is so heavily biased one way or the other - such that people can read only content that is edited towards their beliefs/prejudices, and go through life believing them to be indisputable facts.

Critical challenge is essential, and I believe everyone should go out of their way to seek out and read (factual and well researched!) material contrary to their current opinions.

Amen to that!

And that is perhaps exactly why the article is "uncomfortable" reading - it comes from the economics editor of a news source that was typically leaning the other way. Highly recommended reading.

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31 minutes ago, Al Krow said:

Amen to that!

And that is perhaps exactly why the article is "uncomfortable" reading - it comes from the economics editor of a news source that was typically leaning the other way. Highly recommended reading.

Are you getting paid by the click Al?

Although I am not interested in discussing brexit any more (just the difficulties it has imposed on me), I didn't find it highly recommended reading, or even particularly insightful, and whether it was the economic editor or something else, it was a set of points that have always been not only true but obvious being used to jump to a conclusion the points didn't indicate (in fact the points point the other way).

I can't believe there is a person on the planet that says that the way that the EU has run business has been particularly good, and it is understandable a lot of people have a hard time, but a lot of that article just points to the economic issues in the UK and lays them at the feet of the EU, like the EU was something imposed on us from afar. Far from it, we were one of the big drivers of the economic integration, and had a big say at the table. In the last few years our influence has waned as we elected clowns to represent us who weren't interested in doing the job, only taking the money.

To blame the EU for things like low wages and the north south divide, while very convenient for our governments is very easy - these were choices our successive governments made, and by extension, we made. No law says we have to pay farmers nothing or care workers, we liked it because it made our taxes less and we didn't care. 

The current government seems intent now we are unconnected with the EU to turn the UK into a low tax environment, which means less money for the people who need the help, less money for health and social care etc.

That article is written from the point of view of an economic editor - ie, someone at the top of their field who is paid well and is interested in the idea of economics, but not from the point of view of someone wanting to get by. There is nothing he says that is wrong from his point of view, there is nothing in brexit that is going to keep food from his table, and the EU was always viewed here as a right wing thing, the hard left has always wanted to disconnect for protectionism.

There is not going to be more money for the people at the bottom from this, there is not going to be more money for health or social care or agriculture or anything the left value, because the people in charge (and him to an extent) don't care about that. Just that there needs to be is irrelevant. Just because care homes need more money now, doesn't mean they are going to get it. They were understaffed before, they will be more understaffed now. Just means the government can get rid of protections to save money. Manufacturing isn't magically going to come back any time soon, there isn't anyone to sell our products to.

Brexit is an idiological battle, one that both the left and the right share, but they have very different goals in what they want from it.

 

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It's all very well saying that it will be more economical to support local musical instrument retailers, but remember that the vast majority of musical equipment isn't made in the UK and those items which are, rely on lots of imported parts. 

And while there's a lot of love for the mainstream brands, Basschat is also the supporter of plenty of small niche ones too. It looks as though, for a lot of them selling to the UK for the moment will simply be too much hassle. That's certainly what people with first-hand experience are reporting in this thread. 

Interesting times (in the Chinese sense if the phrase) ahead.

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54 minutes ago, Al Krow said:

Amen to that!

And that is perhaps exactly why the article is "uncomfortable" reading - it comes from the economics editor of a news source that was typically leaning the other way. Highly recommended reading.

The only thing uncomfortable about that article is that Larry Elliot is employed by anyone to comment on economics, let alone be and Economics Editor. I didn't even bother with him when I did economics at University

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57 minutes ago, Al Krow said:

Amen to that!

And that is perhaps exactly why the article is "uncomfortable" reading - it comes from the economics editor of a news source that was typically leaning the other way. Highly recommended reading.

Just to add a bit of context, the “news source” may have supported remaining in the EU but the journalist in question has advocated us leaving the EU for decades. So whilst the source may be a surprise the views of the journalist aren’t.

(that’s my one political post of the year out the way early!)

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5 minutes ago, BigRedX said:

It's all very well saying that it will be more economical to support local musical instrument retailers, but remember that the vast majority of musical equipment isn't made in the UK and those items which are, rely on lots of imported parts. 

And while there's a lot of love for the mainstream brands, Basschat is also the supporter of plenty of small niche ones too. It looks as though, for a lot of them selling to the UK for the moment will simply be too much hassle. That's certainly what people with first-hand experience are reporting in this thread. 

Interesting times (in the Chinese sense if the phrase) ahead.

Also, I don't think people realise that well known brands don't always come to UK direct from place of manufacturer.

From the packing labels on the last cab I bought - it was made in China, shipped to USA, then shipped to Netherlands, finally to be be shipped to a UK online retailer.

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Final notice, folks. Any more Brexit talk and the topic gets locked. 

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Posted (edited)

There’s a lot of spin going on about just what we can do now we’ve completely left. On the Marr show this morning BJ was asked to give some tangible benefits of Brexit, his reply was that the UK can now have freeports and we’ve banned pulse fishing.

We had freeports when we were in the EU, and France banned pulse fishing in 2019. There’s a big deal about ending the ‘Tampon tax’, yet just a few years ago his party - and him - voted against such a measure.

It’s politics for people who don’t bother to look deeper into what’s being said, just blithely believe it. The EU wasn’t perfect, nobody said it was. The leave process has so far cost £200 billion, which I’m told is more than we’ve paid in over the forty or so years we were members, and for what? Things we could already have, including blue passports.

Edited by ambient
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1 minute ago, Rich said:

Final notice, folks. Any more Brexit talk and the topic gets locked. 

Apologies, I was already typing my response before I read your reply.

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, BigRedX said:

It's all very well saying that it will be more economical to support local musical instrument retailers, but remember that the vast majority of musical equipment isn't made in the UK and those items which are, rely on lots of imported parts. 

 

Indeed - everyone (individuals; or UK-based shops) has to import bass guitars to the UK, they'll all pay the same duty so there is no imbalance there. Its that some non-UK shops will choose not to import, while others will. Sure, there will be a rebalancing. It might mean that other non-UK shops, for example USA ones, have an opportunity instead. Also, there might be a lesser choice. For basses its basically a non-issue.

But it might impact other areas short-term. Longer term, the trend would suggest more items are manufactured/sourced etc in the UK itself (ie less importation). Personally I think it will take a generation for that type of effect to occur.

Edited by paul_c2

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1 hour ago, Rich said:

Final notice, folks. Any more Brexit talk and the topic gets locked. 

Yes, appologies, I didn't want to get into that but constant pushing is going to do that.

Its not really an interesting subject any more (if it ever was), but is here now and I am interested in what the new rules are for shipping things between countries.

I was asked last week if I could ship my thunderbird to europe, It didn't seem like a good idea

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I wonder if we're going to see MusicMan being another brand that Thomann won't be able to sell to the UK?

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Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, jimmyb625 said:

I wonder if we're going to see MusicMan being another brand that Thomann won't be able to sell to the UK?

It seems to be just Fender at the minute, and it looks like it's come directly from Fender and it's not something Thomann are happy about. 

I checked Gibson last night and there seems to be no problems supplying them. 

Edited by Newfoundfreedom
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10 minutes ago, Newfoundfreedom said:

It seems to be just Fender at the minute, and it looks like it's come directly from Fender and it's not something Thomann are happy about. 

I checked Gibson last night and there seems to be no problems supplying them. 

Why Fender?

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8 minutes ago, Newfoundfreedom said:

It seems to be just Fender at the minute, and it looks like it's come directly from Fender and it's not something Thomann are happy about. 

I checked Gibson last night and there seems to be no problems supplying them. 

I know that they (MusicMan) don't allow their US dealers to sell new instruments out of country, which makes me wonder if they'll now enforce the same policies between the UK and the EU. 

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Fender are the ones who did "price fixing" and got admonished for it? I wonder if they're put something into the contract with Thomann, that they can't supply UK? I've heard similar, for US-based suppliers.

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Just now, ambient said:

Why Fender?

I think it's a supply chain thing. If memory serves, there's a Fender (UK) setup, which handles importation, distribution, repairs and the like.

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Posted (edited)

The same situation applies if you try buy Yamaha from Thomann.

Also Line 6, but not, strangely, Ampeg.

Edited by MrCrane
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Posted (edited)

I’m reading on Facebook that people are having problems buying items from EU countries through eBay too. They’re able to click ‘buy now’, but then unable to complete the transaction and pay for it.

Edited by ambient

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Ebay  new notices:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/help/buying/paying-items/paying-tax-ebay-purchases?id=4771&fbclid=IwAR1T7iWGZG9KLSA_hVN80RnOGWyiaasJtXe7pUiMvPkFJvxfoV1EHOMpytU
 

 

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