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Pat testing


aDx

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I found a 2nd PAT machine on an auction site, got some stickers which came with a disc with certificates on to print off. The physical checks are the most important and I suspect most of us take pride in our kit and know it inside out so would change a cracked plug or exposed cable without a thought. I also do the PA bits for the band and test the other members amps etc. 
we get asked for certificates about 3-4 times a year so it has paid for itself.

 

This is from the HSE website;

Is Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) compulsory?

No. The law simply requires an employer to ensure that their electrical equipment is maintained in order to prevent danger. It does not say how this should be done or how often. Employers should take a risk-based approach, considering the type of equipment and what it is being used for. If it is used regularly and moved a lot eg a floor cleaner or a kettle, testing (along with visual checks) can be an important part of an effective maintenance regime giving employers confidence that they are doing what is necessary to help them meet their legal duties. HSE provides guidance on how to maintain equipment including the use of PAT.

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Our drummer is a PAT tester and I am an electrician, so we don't have any worries here.

 

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 are what venues must adhere to.  Having a satisfactory EICR for the electrical installation and PAT tests for the appliances plugged into the installation are ways to prove that they are complying.

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How many time have folks asked to see a venue's EICR certificate, when they have asked the band for proof of PAT testing?

 

I tried it at a venue in Aberdeen, where we were getting horrible earth hum from the fridges, through the PA. Management were not very amused.

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On 01/02/2019 at 18:44, casapete said:

My tech guy said that when you get asked for your test certificates, always ask the venue  for their certificate proving the electric supply to the stage is tested and safe. You may be surprised at the outcome I think....😉

We have played plenty of places where the electrics have been suss. We were always more worried about our amps than the pubs were about our gear not being up to scratch. Nothing worse than going full tilt and the electrics cut out.

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In 35 years of gigging, I've been told by two venues that my gear must be PAT tested. Neither time did they actually check, not even a cursory glance at the stickers on the plugs.

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12 minutes ago, Rich said:

In 35 years of gigging, I've been told by two venues that my gear must be PAT tested. Neither time did they actually check, not even a cursory glance at the stickers on the plugs.

that's happened to us a few times, regarding venues with dodgy electrics, that's one of the reasons I went wireless

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9 minutes ago, PaulWarning said:

regarding venues with dodgy electrics, that's one of the reasons I went wireless

Ditto. 

 

Edited by Rich
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1 hour ago, Simon. said:

How many time have folks asked to see a venue's EICR certificate, when they have asked the band for proof of PAT testing?

 

I tried it at a venue in Aberdeen, where we were getting horrible earth hum from the fridges, through the PA. Management were not very amused.

 

Where was that?  Nosey Aberdonian asking - feel free to PM if you prefer not to say publicly :)

 

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On 01/02/2019 at 19:06, Mottlefeeder said:

The legal requirement is that the equipment is maintained in a safe state, so far as is reasonably practicable. If you are paid for the gig, you are at work, and it is your responsibility. If you are not 'at work', the organizer is, and it will be his/her responsibility. The easiest way to discharge that responsibility is to ensure that all mains powered equipment has been checked by a competent person, and looking for 'PAT tested' labels on everything is one option. However, there is no legal requirement to put a sticker on each item, and that option can be abused. Asking for a certificate itemizing the tested items is a more professional approach. Carrying that itemized list on your phone, so you can show it/email it to an organizer, is your easiest option.

Basic equipment to carry out portable appliance testing (pass/fail of equipment and mains leads) start at £150 [https://www.tester.co.uk/testsafe-minipat-appliance-tester], so it will pay for itself in 2-3 years, or sooner if you start charging for checking other local bands' gear.

David

this

 

the venues that wanted it werent interested in labels they wanted to see the summary certificate listing all the gear and the insepction date/status

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1 hour ago, neepheid said:

 

Where was that?  Nosey Aberdonian asking - feel free to PM if you prefer not to say publicly :)

 

Pretty sure it was Drummonds, but to fair this was about 15 years ago, so I'm sure they've got their act together since then.

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1 hour ago, Simon. said:

Pretty sure it was Drummonds, but to fair this was about 15 years ago, so I'm sure they've got their act together since then.

 

Is that the sh*th*le on the edge of a cliff with a huge fire escape down to the ground out the back? If so, the stage at that place was a disgusting, beer soaked, electrical mess last time I played there (admittedly some 10+ years ago) 

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There a couple of old threads on this subject worth looking up.

As an Electrical engineer and there are a few on here speaking some sense, I would seriously advise you not to take risk and get your gear regularly checked and tested. Its all about due diligence, and certificates should show a history of that equipment having been checked. It is not about buying a machine and pressing a button, Its about inspection and understanding what can go wrong and looking for it.  If you are serious about your Band and your performance why risk your lives and potential earnings by calling a venues bluff and possibly getting turned away having traveled miles to get there.

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