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Killed_by_Death

G.A.S. is a sickness that we encourage!

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Just got back from a sale, my GSR100EX for only $100 USD.

Guy would not just sod off after the transaction, instead he gets out his phone & is showing me photos 1 by 1 of his 50+ instrument collection.

Who has the heart to tell him that he must be mentally ill?

Buying up stuff just because it's a deal is some sort of sickness in my opinion.

However, we are encouraged to Buy More almost everywhere in the player communities online.

Even I am guilty of buying due to influence from the internet, but when it's the other way around NO one will take heed of the ONE guy who is commenting NOT to buy it just because it's there!

 

Edited by Killed_by_Death
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Different kind of Large bass collections

1- slowly growers. 

These folk never seem to sell anything, they have their first bass, and their second and every so often will buy something new. They never sell so don’t seem to have GAS. They will have a collection with a wide age range of basses and look down at the GAS fuelled rabid buying and selling of others.

 

2- collectors

these folk have a thing they are into, if you ask them about it they are very knowledgeable about it and have a desire to own or try as much as they can. Whether it’s Warwicks, 70s japanese, Peavey or pre-cbs fenders it doesn’t really matter. They will have their favourite gigging bass and then half a dozen variations of the same model

3- professional players

they make thier living playing bass of in music and have their main instrument. They will have a few of them as backup, and possibly will have been provided by the company. For recording and for fun they might have anything from a handful to dozens of other instruments. You can tell them by string preference to main instrument, close relationships over years with companies and being too busy to want to spend much time on here.

 

4- semi-professional players

like the above but they make their main living doing something else. This means more free cash flow so they know what they like, it just will be a bit newer than the pro player and they possibly went for an upgraded top wood

 

5- thing lovers

these players have a large collection of basses with no discernible theme or reason. Mostly lower end models they seem to have hoovered up lots of different make models and styles. Because they aren’t throwing big money at anything expect to see a lot of lower end instruments that are “actually way better than you would imagine”. In conversation about their instruments expect verboseness but little detail.

 

6- GAS fuelled thing lovers 

these players are similar to normal thing lovers, but ascribe to the idea in the marketing that more expensive things will be better. Their collection may not be large but it seems constantly in flux and week to week who knows what basses they will take to practice. Despite all evidence to the contrary they like to think themselves as discerning, so will go into excruciating detail And cause the luthier a massive headache when spec-ing a bass. They like to signal their discernment to others of their tribe with comments like “ah if this had an extra string”. (Btw the custom bass went from being the best thing ever to being traded for a Roscoe in about 6 months)

 

7- GAS fuelled swappers.

like the above but unable to keep a large collection For whatever reason. Tend to have a small collection of higher end instruments. All but one of them will have a price if you ask. (And if you are asking You probably are one)

8- Stopper swappers

Gas fuelled swappers who have stopped for whatever reason. Used to be on Basschat a lot. Not any more. Will be nice to say hello when they log on to sell their Ceilinder.

9- completists

pride themselves one not having GAS, not as picky as some of the above - they have a a small collection... 1 precision, one jazz, one 5 string, one stingray, one fretless, one EUB etc 


9- Stans

These guys try to emulate their favourite player. They have the signature model. And the previous signature model, and a version of the bass they became famous on. If a Mark King fan they may pay their salery directly to Status Graphite

10- Trend followers 
you know when things are on trend on talkbass? These guys seem to follow the trend, yes they had a Lakland, and a SX and a Sire - and whatever got a bit of a buzz about them. Seem to go through cabs fairly quickly

 

11- the reader

of course you sir or madam, the reader are a wonderful individual who only makes rational thought through decisions, unswayed by marketing, peer pressure or phycological need. You are truely free (but have you tried....)

Edited by LukeFRC
All characters appearing in this post are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. No animals were harmed in the writing.
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What's the name for the poor deluded fools who think they just want a nice pair of basses to settle down with, and are just sorting out exactly what it is they need? 😒

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4 minutes ago, BlueMoon said:

Been there, seen it, done it.............and, bought the T shirt!

Then five more of the same tee shirt just all in different colours!


There’s a behavioural approach called intermittent reinforcement and when applied to GAS or purchases folks will go through the process of a new purchase, scour the for sale sites, email the seller, discuss spec even kick the tyre or have a play round someone gaff (before Covid naturally) etc. etc. but not every ‘hunt’ is rewarded with a purchase. It’s the precursor to GAS and is often as rewarding in the sense of going through the motions. Many folk even make the purchase but return it as the ‘remorse’ kicks in or the realisation that the item was never really needed or wanted; the process being more significant than the reward, the process itself fulfilling a need or function.
Now that function could be two or threefold in the eye of the person  - it generates content/interest, it’s seen as great hands on learning/research, it offers a distraction from or an excuse for not having done other task  i.e. it’s veiled as learning/research but ultimately just results in time off the instrument or the work task.
 

Sometimes the purchase goes ahead and the item is beiefly used but ultimately becomes unused/secondary to a perfectly adequate instrument/bicycle/kitchen gadget *insert item here*  (how many of us or our partners have all the latest kitchen gadgets or tools which remain unsullied by use?).

We can probably all see a bit of ourselves in Luke’s post 😀

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10 minutes ago, krispn said:

.....

Sometimes the purchase goes ahead and the item is beiefly used but ultimately becomes unused/secondary to a perfectly adequate instrument/bicycle/kitchen gadget *insert item here*  (how many of us or our partners have all the latest kitchen gadgets or tools which remain unsullied by use?).

We can probably all see a bit of ourselves in Luke’s post 😀

That is a perceptive comment. I've got a big birthday coming up soon and I'm thinking of buying myself a really nice USA Fender Jazz to replace my ratty MIM Jazz. The thing is - would I play it, or just carry on playing my old one and look at the shiny occasionally and feel a bit oppressed by having an expensive thing I'm not using?

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7 hours ago, Killed_by_Death said:

However, we are encouraged to Buy More almost everywhere in the player communities online.

Even I am guilty of buying due to influence from the internet, but when it's the other way around NO one will take heed of the ONE guy who is commenting NOT to buy it just because it's there!

We are encouraged to Buy More once we escape the womb and are bombarded with the message until we expire, not just in online communities. This is how the wheels of our societies keep turning.

I can recall, more than once, suggesting someone should have a think about what it is they really want when someone posts one of those baffling "Tell me what I should buy" threads. If you don't know what it is you want, keep the cash in your pocket.

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I’ve never been called perceptive before 😀 I have a old CV jazz I did a few upgrades on and I know while I may lust after a higher end jazz it’s not really gonna offer me anything more other than bragging rights. When I think I’d like a new bass I pick up one I own, play it,  maybe stick some flat wound strings on it and try it into both my amps with very different settings - one all clean and hifi funky the other all mean and driven. I normally find the gas settles quickly after I play the same three riffs I know and realise the extra expensive instrument would be wasted on my level of ability and I have quite enough furniture/clutter as it is! 😀

Edited by krispn
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I don't see a problem.  if I want it, can afford it, have room for it, I'll get it.  End of.  If it turns out to be less than expected, I'll move it on.  If it is better than expected, I'll keep it and move on something else.  Or not.  At least I would have had the experience of playing it for a while.  I call it 'curiosity' rather than GAS and certainly nobody else's business.

Of course if it meant not being able to meet debts or put food on the table that is another thing.

 

Edited by Paul S
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49 minutes ago, AndyTravis said:

Feel like a 7. What do I win...

a secondhand Wal? (if you keep saving and pray the car doesn't break) 

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5 minutes ago, LukeFRC said:

a secondhand Wal? (if you keep saving and pray the car doesn't break) 

I’m alright you know, I doubt one will come up at a price I can afford so it’ll just stay in the pipe dream section.

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I thought I was (finally) growing up and had kicked the GAS habit - however my credit card statement from the weekend disagrees..

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I've only bought what I've needed. I don't get GAS unless it's a bass or equipment that serves a purpose and fills a need. There's always a danger of spending more time buying equipment than actually playing it.

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4 minutes ago, TheLowDown said:

There's always a danger of spending more time buying equipment than actually playing it.

That is so true. 

I'd like at least to be in remission with my GAS addiction.

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Several years ago I was more into shopping for gear than I was in staying home & enjoying the things I already had.

There's a meme about it, but I can never find it when I want it.

There are two windows, 1 with a sign that reads "Learn how to use the gear your currently have",

and the other is "Shop for new gear"

The line for the buy new window is long & there's no one in line for 'learn how to use it'.

 

TBH Depression set in when I finally stopped shopping, i was having no more 'honeymoon' periods.

When the rubber meets the road, I am really bad at practicing.

 

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1 hour ago, Killed_by_Death said:

TBH Depression set in when I finally stopped shopping, i was having no more 'honeymoon' periods.

Incidentally, depression frequently leads to shopping to give people that dopamine hit. A bass arrives in the post and they will feel good, but only for a moment. This is a slippery slope because it means that people will keep hitting the BUY button to feel good, and the more they buy the more they go into debt or worsen their finances. The worse they feel, the more they hit the BUY button. Goto 10.

A much better and long term way of getting that dopamine hit is to practice on the gear that one already has, improving skills, learning new theory, feel more important as a bassist and musician, and selling the gear that you no longer need.

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Trouble is, the benefit from practicing every day doesn't become apparent for months, buying stuff gives that instant gratification.

I wish I had back all the gasoline I blew out of my vehicle driving to Guitar Center & Sam Ash, not to mention the miles I put on my vehicle.

 

Edited by Killed_by_Death
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2 hours ago, TheLowDown said:

Incidentally, depression frequently leads to shopping to give people that dopamine hit. A bass arrives in the post and they will feel good, but only for a moment. This is a slippery slope because it means that people will keep hitting the BUY button to feel good, and the more they buy the more they go into debt or worsen their finances. The worse they feel, the more they hit the BUY button. Goto 10.

I know that feeling only too well. The thrill of a new bass gives a quick buzz, often followed by the realisation that you prefer the ones you already had. 

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I do believe that often a new acquisition seems better at first, while it might not actually be better, but just different.

However, my big bass purchases over the last few years were always upgrades, most recently being the Ergonomic Headless by Ibanez. No more tennis-elbow, & it has a better EQ & stiffer neck than my Premium Soundgear.

It might become The One, as in the only one, soon.

Right now I'm down to two electrics & one amp, unless you count plugging into my PC as a 2nd amp.

What 'gets me' is the folks with the large collections feel like we should admire them, but I feel pity. It's like an albatross.

 

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17 minutes ago, Lozz196 said:

I know that feeling only too well. The thrill of a new bass gives a quick buzz, often followed by the realisation that you prefer the ones you already had. 

I made the money saving realisation a while back that the 'I want a new bass' feeling often coincided with my strings getting old. new strings are cheaper than a new bass!

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I can't understand why this thread hasn't been locked, doesn't it go against the site's ethos?

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For me it’s wanting a different sound, only to realise once the initial buzz has worn off that I only like Precisions & Jazzes, P/J basses at a push tho preferably not active.

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