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Heel access truss rod which way does what


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10 hours ago, BlueMoon said:

Yes.....that is the classic, vintage Fender-style truss rod.

Remember to adjust in only slight turns followed by a period to let the neck settle.

Ok thank you for confirming

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On 27/06/2022 at 21:24, shoulderpet said:

Hi

Truss rod adjustment time and the first time I have had to adjust a heel access truss rod, is the below picture correct for which way to turn the truss rod?  Thanks

 

 

TRUSS.jpg

Well those markings are as good as useless. Does the top of the adjuster need to go right (clockwise) to tighten, or the bottom of the adjuster go right (anti clockwise)?

I'd assume it's a normal right-hand thread, and clockwise would tighten it.

 

If they're going to bother with markings, why not use markings that're meaningful ? 🙄

Edited by barkin
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19 minutes ago, yorks5stringer said:

Righty tighty, lefty loosen

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Does this make sense?

Not really, because it needs a qualifier (the reference to 12 o'clock) in order for it to be unambiguous.

Sayiing "anti/clockwise", and marking as such, would avoid that ambiguity.

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I'm not sure if you are just being pedantic and/or genuinely wish to adjust your truss rod? 

 

However, if you take an L shaped allen key insert the short end into the hole so the long end of the allen key is pointing to 12 o'clock i.e. directly vertical/upwards. Then proceed to move the allen key towards 3 o'clock (i.e. clockwise). This will tighten the truss rod and make the fretboard 'flatter'. Equally the opposite action from 12 oclock towards 9 o'clock (anticlockwise) in the other direction will loosen the truss rod. I use the analogy '12 o'clok to 3 o'clock' just to indicate the direction of travel ,you may need to go further but heed the warnings in posts above about how far you turn the adjustment.

 

It's a good idea to mentally count how far you have adjusted directionwise so you know how far to go back, hence me using the clock analogy. A dot made with a black marker on the truss rod adjusting head can be helpful in this case too.

 

Equally there are loads of YT videos on truss rod adjustment if you are someone who needs to see it being done as opposed to reading about it, we all learn differently!

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No, your post makes perfect sense. Apologies if I appeared to suggest otherwise.

 

I was simply observing that the oft quoted mantra of "righty tighty, lefty loosey" is ambiguous, as evidenced by the fact that it needs additional words to clarify exactly what it means...

 

If the markings in the original post had instead used an anti-clockwise arrow for loosen, instead of a left pointing arrow, and a clockwise symbol instead of the right pointing arrow, it's immediately obvious and unambiguous.

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14 minutes ago, barkin said:

No, your post makes perfect sense. Apologies if I appeared to suggest otherwise.

 

I was simply observing that the oft quoted mantra of "righty tighty, lefty loosey" is ambiguous, as evidenced by the fact that it needs additional words to clarify exactly what it means...

 

If the markings in the original post had instead used an anti-clockwise arrow for loosen, instead of a left pointing arrow, and a clockwise symbol instead of the right pointing arrow, it's immediately obvious and unambiguous.

No worries! TBH have never seen markings like your photo before and agree re the symbols. I suppose it's a bit like traffic lights, if you have no prior knowledge of what the colours do/are then they are just meaningless random  lights....

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1 hour ago, Reggaebass said:

You probably already know ,but use a good fitting screwdriver to adjust it so as not to damage the slots 

Good point as most of my adjusters are allen heads, looking closely at the OP's photo it is slotted possibly crossed?

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I would agree with @barkin about the qualifier need for left/right as opposed to clockwise/anticlockwise. I always thought this was a side effect of the fact that I am slightly dyslexic, but I think that it might be more to do with the fact that often I need to be adjusting screws at weird angles. I've found the simplest way is to use a ratchet screwdriver with the direction correctly set so that turning in the wrong direction does nothing.

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1 hour ago, BigRedX said:

I would agree with @barkin about the qualifier need for left/right as opposed to clockwise/anticlockwise. I always thought this was a side effect of the fact that I am slightly dyslexic, but I think that it might be more to do with the fact that often I need to be adjusting screws at weird angles.

 

No, diagrams like that are completely meaningless and more than a little irritating. Moving the truss rod in either of those directions would break the neck, as you actually have to turn the nut, and the only two viable ways are clockwise or anticlockwise (or counterclockwise if you are viewing from the states)

 

But obviously the caveat here is, whatever anyone says, this is for a fender style truss rod, and although it is common with 99% of the worlds truss rods, it isn't a 100% accepted standard, there is at least one (and probably only one) who does it the other way round!

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3 minutes ago, shoulderpet said:

They make some tasty instruments, sadly most of them are out of my price range

 

It was just a note of warning that the truss rod works the other way on them, see the 'I think I have broken my truss rod' threads!

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On 29/06/2022 at 19:52, barkin said:

No, your post makes perfect sense. Apologies if I appeared to suggest otherwise.

 

I was simply observing that the oft quoted mantra of "righty tighty, lefty loosey" is ambiguous, as evidenced by the fact that it needs additional words to clarify exactly what it means...

 

If the markings in the original post had instead used an anti-clockwise arrow for loosen, instead of a left pointing arrow, and a clockwise symbol instead of the right pointing arrow, it's immediately obvious and unambiguous.

In my mind righty tighty lefty loosey is just fine. I equivocate right with clockwise and vice versa.

 

No hex keys involved. I never owned one but it looks like a big arsed Phillips might fit, miracle of miracles style, no idea what the proper driver is but they are are advertised.

 

Screw heads are funny things. The right driver will tuck in and 'stick' with no wobble at all. The right driver is the only one to use or the screw head will get munched on with each visit.

 

The Phillips head should never have been invented. The only advantage is it is cheap and easy to make.

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Stewmac do a truss rod wrench, a big phillips doesn’t fit because it’s a cross slot and there’s no hole for the point if you know what I mean, I’m guessing if you’re good with metalwork it probably wouldn’t be too hard to make something 

CAC84A61-D222-4964-B32C-165B5F72689F.jpeg

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I've got two basses with this truss rod adjustment - I use a large flat head screwdriver after removing the scratch plate. It works so long as I'm careful, but any slip would be messy.

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29 minutes ago, Reggaebass said:

Stewmac do a truss rod wrench, a big phillips doesn’t fit because it’s a cross slot and there’s no hole for the point if you know what I mean, I’m guessing if you’re good with metalwork it probably wouldn’t be too hard to make something 

CAC84A61-D222-4964-B32C-165B5F72689F.jpeg

Nothing like having the correct tool. However, someone here said a paint can opener will do the same job. At just £1.80 from B&Q (other diy stores are available) I thought I’d give it a go. The tip needed a little more angle and a a little filing for a better fit, but it works really well. 
 

 

9E4967C3-C3A0-4B5B-98D4-D7D0FFE9AAB1.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Downunderwonder said:

The Phillips head should never have been invented. The only advantage is it is cheap and easy to make.

They work much better with power tools due to the self gripping and centring. 2 other advantages. 

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