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Hi! Not sure where to post this since it’s sort of a general question. I love Rocco Palladino’s sound with Tom Misch! Does anyone here know what strings/amps he uses? I know he plays a jazz bass with what appears to be a both pickups on with flats sound. In particular the sounds on ”Lift Off” and ”Kyiv” w. Tom Misch and Yussef Dayes. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I guess you mean Pino PALLADINO. 😉 

My bad, he's Pino's son !

Edited by Hellzero

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Many years ago I did a lot of work around identifying the instruments, strings and amps of a couple of to my mind iconic bassists (OK, Flea and Zender). Sadly, not only did using exactly the same equipment not make me sound anything like the target players, I probably sounded even less like them than I'd done on my former gear. Conclusion? Play an instrument and setup you're comfortable with and play in the style of the player you want to emulate.

It was mention on strings in the OP that made me reply. I've found some strings (Fleas Bass Boomers for example) appear to make me sound bloody awful, others flatter my playing. I've no idea why, but I generally stick to the latter :)

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3 hours ago, Vanheusen77 said:

Hi! Not sure where to post this since it’s sort of a general question. I love Rocco Palladino’s sound with Tom Misch! Does anyone here know what strings/amps he uses? I know he plays a jazz bass with what appears to be a both pickups on with flats sound. In particular the sounds on ”Lift Off” and ”Kyiv” w. Tom Misch and Yussef Dayes. 

 

 

He uses a Squier JV Jazz. Great player 👌🏻

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1 hour ago, yorks5stringer said:

How cool that one great Bassist names his son after one great Bassist?

...like J. Jamerson jr.

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An hour ago, I was actually holding Pino's red Precision.

Seriously.

 

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I played Pino's fretless 'Ray years ago, I sounded just like him (if he'd been in a horrible accident and lost the use of his hands and ears).

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9 minutes ago, chris_b said:

Did you sound like him when he holds it?

Yes ... I found his fingers in the gigbag and it was all there.

 

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The apple really doesn't fall from tree does it? Even has the PP head bob.

 

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But would anyone be talking about him if he wasn't the son of...?

I''m sorry but tastes differ, I checked his playing, didn't hear anything which drew my attention or saw a sign of the greatness I had expected after reading about his playing..

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5 minutes ago, wombatboter said:

But would anyone be talking about him if he wasn't the son of...?

Having a famous Dad always generates interest, but you have to deliver or else the talking stops pretty quickly.

From the little I've seen he looks like a good player.

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Sorry, but when the dancers came into shot I genuinely thought it was going to be French & Saunders, I laughed out loud. Probably says a little too much about me, sorry.

I like the bass tone, and the drumming is great, but am not getting the current wave of instrumental bands of obviously highly talented musicians playing what sounds to my ear like 1970's lift music. There also seems to be a generic vibe about them all, a certain aesthetic in visual style from the physical surroundings to the body language and facial expressions of the musicians.

Perhaps I'm just in bad mood, I'll have to go back to the bit when the dancers come in again :)  

 

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10 minutes ago, Beedster said:

Sorry, but when the dancers came into shot I genuinely thought it was going to be French & Saunders, I laughed out loud. Probably says a little too much about me, sorry.

I like the bass tone, and the drumming is great, but am not getting the current wave of instrumental bands of obviously highly talented musicians playing what sounds to my ear like 1970's lift music. There also seems to be a generic vibe about them all, a certain aesthetic in visual style from the physical surroundings to the body language and facial expressions of the musicians.

Perhaps I'm just in bad mood, I'll have to go back to the bit when the dancers come in again :)  

 

Couldn't agree more. Much more talented than me but leaves me completely cold.
 

As for the smug expressions...

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1 hour ago, Happy Jack said:

An hour ago, I was actually holding Pino's red Precision.

Seriously.

 

How did that come about - or is it rude to ask?!

What did you think of it?

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It's in Martin's workshop at The Bass Gallery, and he kindly took it out to show me.

I know it's "just a Precision" - this was his Custom Shop replica of his original - but it was genuinely a gorgeous example of the breed. Not flashy, no exotic diseased woods, no gold-plated hardware, but an excellent player's bass.

I've seen (and owned) lots of Precisions. Some call out "play me", most don't.

This one did.

 

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13 minutes ago, Beedster said:

I ... am not getting the current wave of instrumental bands of obviously highly talented musicians playing what sounds to my ear like 1970's lift music. There also seems to be a generic vibe about them all, a certain aesthetic in visual style from the physical surroundings to the body language and facial expressions of the musicians.

It's better than Ed Sheeran so I'm not complaining even though I'm not particularly excited either but then it's just one of those things that happens from time to time, y'know, someone puts out a YT vid of themself playing some 1970's lift music in a dimly lit studio while looking all thoughtful and musicianly, and people say 'Oh, wow, you've got to hear this' and some other musos think 'Well, me and Ben and Torq could do that' so they go off and do it and put out a YT vid and soon pretty much everyone's doing it then someone else gets dressed up as a Bay of Biscay trawlerman and plays sea shanties to an EDM beat while looking all thoughtful and musicianly and the cycle kicks off again.

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4 minutes ago, Happy Jack said:

It's in Martin's workshop at The Bass Gallery, and he kindly took it out to show me.

I know it's "just a Precision" - this was his Custom Shop replica of his original - but it was genuinely a gorgeous example of the breed. Not flashy, no exotic diseased woods, no gold-plated hardware, but an excellent player's bass.

I've seen (and owned) lots of Precisions. Some call out "play me", most don't.

This one did.

 

Excellent! I think they do quite a bit for him in there. There was a US Lakland Decade in the Gallery last year that used to belong to Pino - it was wonderful; beautifully set up and great to play - and I probably (genuinely) spent two hours discussing it with John! And no, I still couldn’t get it to sound like Mr P!!

I purchased a CS Pino model off the site/here a couple of years back and it’s a fabulous bass - slightly chunkier neck but so great to play.

Right, what time does the Gallery close?! 

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12 minutes ago, Old Horse Murphy said:

As for the smug expressions...

Yep, I was going to make a reference to Jazz musicians but IMO most of the good ones don;t look smug in the way a lot of modern players appear to (huge generalisation I know). But I felt I've seen the consistent smugness somewhere before. 

Folk! Bloody folk!

Specifically Transatlantic Sessions which we used to watch as a band occasionally and wet ourselves at just how smug a bunch of musicians could look. I remember one set where the DB player was holding down about as rudimentary a root-5th pattern as is possible whilst pulling the sort of faces you've expected of Mingus when pulling out some of the most physically demanding and musically complex DB possible. Very entertaining :)

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4 minutes ago, skankdelvar said:

It's better than Ed Sheeran so I'm not complaining even though I'm not particularly excited either but then it's just one of those things that happens from time to time, y'know, someone puts out a YT vid of themself playing some 1970's lift music in a dimly lit studio while looking all thoughtful and musicianly, and people say 'Oh, wow, you've got to hear this' and some other musos think 'Well, me and Ben and Torq could do that' so they go off and do it and put out a YT vid and soon pretty much everyone's doing it then someone else gets dressed up as a Bay of Biscay trawlerman and plays sea shanties to an EDM beat while looking all thoughtful and musicianly and the cycle kicks off again.

As ever Skank, hammer on nail :)

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2 minutes ago, Happy Jack said:

Rumbled!

 

Sorry mate, you didn't keep up the payments

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Posted (edited)
50 minutes ago, Beedster said:

smugness

It's not so much smugness as an air of 'Look at me. I'm in control not only of my instrument but also of my life and everything going on in it. That's because - at my core - I'm a stable, well-adjusted person to whom integrity and authenticity are more important than financial gain or transient popularity'.

So, basically, the mating signal of the (current) younger generation and one which musos integrate into their recordings and performances the better to engage with their audience. It's the old 'dress and act like your punters only 10% more'.

Permit me to expand.

Crudely speaking, I am of the second 'rock muso' generation where both musos and male consumers (sometimes) attracted sexual partners through displays of an unbridled, nay, rampant masculinity reminiscent of Vikings on a North Sea cruise. Fast cars, random destruction of property, indiscriminate porking, heavy consumption of recreational narcotics including but not limited to Heineken lager, cheap bourbon, red leb and pills. Girlies liked that sort of (falsified) image or so we thought. Bands sold their records off the back of it.

The third generation was all about 'Oh, I'm so sad, I'm crying, everything's all too much, it's all black sheets of rain. I might sometimes play loud, discordant guitar but underneath I'm just a little boy who's grazed his knee and wants mummy to kiss it better then, if possible, work upwards'. That's everyone from Cobain through to the afore-mentioned Sheeran*.

The current Gen 4 is all about character and identity and moderation and dressing down and having the latest app, and looking all buttoned-up and extremely unlikely to make a sudden lunge for the jubblies, this on the basis that to do so would be a shameful loss of control and antithetical to the ethical framework of their lives.

Basically, it's a way of looking un-threatening and a bit superior to the norm, and those who practice this modus operandi  undoubtedly do so in the hope of enhancing their chance of playing 'sink the brisket' with whomsoever may be the object of their interest. Punters do it to get shagged; musos do it to build an audience.

It's not a bad tactic though no more likely to succeed than those which preceded it..

One awaits Gen 5 with interest. Will those musos go further down the route of restraint? Will they dress like 1950's Dads, embrace temperance and write letters to The Church Times expressing their disquiet at mounting evidence of moral degradation? Or will they throw caution to the wind, don buttock-less leather trousers, neck meths and sing songs about dining at the Y?

I do not know but I think we should be told.
 

* I instance Cobain and Sheeran because they both sit (sat) on the cusp between eras. Cobain started as the wigged-out junkie and ended as the poor little dead boy. Sheeran started as a whiner but has transitioned to self-obsessed, socially-conscious 'entrepreneur'.

Edited by skankdelvar
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