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HazBeen

Finally starting to fall to pieces .... sort of

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1 hour ago, HazBeen said:

This is excellent, yesterday I did a quick mock up of something similar. If you can let the bass rest on your hips that will reduce the strain on your back. Now I know the concept works! Cheers for sharing!

If you want details, dimensions, clearer photos, just drop me a PM.

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Tell me about it. 

Occasional trapped nerve between 5th and 6th, rotator cuff, tinnitus and over active bladder (that can be fun on a longer set....). As me mum says, getting old ain’t for the squeamish.

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HazBeen, if you're only 45 and you have no significant medical issue (slipped disk, etc.) then looking for mechanical solutions is probably not the best option.

If your current woes are caused by poor posture (as in my case, aggravated by having flat feet) then finding complicated structures that will allow you to continue to have poor posture is just going to lead to bigger problems downstream. And yes, I did that too, so I'm talking from experience. If you search Basschat hard enough, you'll probably find my posts about experimenting with 'clever' straps and back-support systems back in 2007/08.

Given my own history, obviously I'm going to recommend starting with an assessment by a good Pilates practitioner - do some research first and choose someone with loads of experience and (preferably) an osteopath qualification too. That said, there are other health professionals, such as physiotherapists, who could do the same thing. You'll make your own decision. The important thing is to nail down right at the start what the actual problem is.

In my case it was all about posture and poor core strength and the answer turned out to be a regular Pilates class and an exercise regime. All of this hit me like a landslide around the time I hit 50 and was playing fewer than a dozen gigs a year. I'm now pushing 63, playing over 70 gigs a year - half of them high energy rockabilly - and in better shape than I was 12 years ago.

My early years of back problems also left me with a very expensive predilection for uber-lightweight gear and that hasn't gone away, but the weight of the bass is no longer the sole deciding factor.

PM me if you'd like to go into any of this in more detail.

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40 minutes ago, Happy Jack said:

HazBeen, if you're only 45 and you have no significant medical issue (slipped disk, etc.) then looking for mechanical solutions is probably not the best option.

If your current woes are caused by poor posture (as in my case, aggravated by having flat feet) then finding complicated structures that will allow you to continue to have poor posture is just going to lead to bigger problems downstream. And yes, I did that too, so I'm talking from experience. If you search Basschat hard enough, you'll probably find my posts about experimenting with 'clever' straps and back-support systems back in 2007/08.

Given my own history, obviously I'm going to recommend starting with an assessment by a good Pilates practitioner - do some research first and choose someone with loads of experience and (preferably) an osteopath qualification too. That said, there are other health professionals, such as physiotherapists, who could do the same thing. You'll make your own decision. The important thing is to nail down right at the start what the actual problem is.

In my case it was all about posture and poor core strength and the answer turned out to be a regular Pilates class and an exercise regime. All of this hit me like a landslide around the time I hit 50 and was playing fewer than a dozen gigs a year. I'm now pushing 63, playing over 70 gigs a year - half of them high energy rockabilly - and in better shape than I was 12 years ago.

My early years of back problems also left me with a very expensive predilection for uber-lightweight gear and that hasn't gone away, but the weight of the bass is no longer the sole deciding factor.

PM me if you'd like to go into any of this in more detail.

Cheers mate, good advice and much appreciated. I have several appointments scheduled with “specialists” to understand where the issues stem form, especially since I never ever had back issues prior.

Clearly before selling all my gear etc it is vital to understand if training, posture can solve the issue. It would be cheaper :)

Will absolutely pm if I feel I need some more first hand experience input. Thank you.

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If you've got a worrying problem then Basschat is the place to be. Always someone willing to help and offer advice.

Makes you proud to be part of it.

Dave

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19 hours ago, musicbassman said:

Are you going for the Joe Dart look?

Seriously, I wonder if that guy's going to suffer for his head-bobbing traits later in life.

Tom Araya certainly has!

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Im 67 and have been gigging either drums, guitar or bass, at various times, since I was 15 and never had a problem. I started doing weights, mainly core and general strength about 25 years ago. I have no interest in big muscles or "Bulking up" but a top physio told me that as you age you lose muscle mass and general strength so even everyday activities slowly become more of an issue. The strength exercises keep me in shape and a two hour gig in never a problem. Two sessions a week in the gym are enough. Use it or lose it, as they say.

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Yep - all of the above for me - 40+ years of gigging takes its toll

The only thing to add having gone light weight for some time. It is not just lifting heavy things and awkward size boxes, but discipline in the preparation to pick it up and then walk with it. We all know this, most of us pull muscles when not thinking and with small objects.

The times i have lifted 15" PA cabs off the stands at the end of the night on my own.  I don't now but wait and ask for help. 

Great video - Take care guys

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Did the physiotherapy/specialist thing. Good and bad news.

The bad: my back is injured from a combination of posture, “general use”, bass playing and genetics (my upper back does not have a fully normal curve).

Good news: it is manageable and controllable by exercise, better posture and putting less strain on my back.

So got a good exercise routine and posture tips, which will help alleviate. I was advised to consider lighter weight instruments and broad straps to minimise strain from my bass playing.

All in all pretty good news, although it will take several weeks for the back to improve. 

Need to think about the lightweight comment.... my favourite basses (Status Electro, Yammy BBP, Ray and Bogarts) are all between 9 and 10.5 lbs. I do not look forward to swapping them for 7/8 lbs basses unless I have to so hopefully exercise will be enough.

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6 minutes ago, HazBeen said:

Good news: it is manageable and controllable by exercise, better posture and putting less strain on my back.

Good to hear :)

All the best!

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42 minutes ago, HazBeen said:

Did the physiotherapy/specialist thing. Good and bad news.

The bad: my back is injured from a combination of posture, “general use”, bass playing and genetics (my upper back does not have a fully normal curve).

Good news: it is manageable and controllable by exercise, better posture and putting less strain on my back.

So got a good exercise routine and posture tips, which will help alleviate. I was advised to consider lighter weight instruments and broad straps to minimise strain from my bass playing.

All in all pretty good news, although it will take several weeks for the back to improve. 

Need to think about the lightweight comment.... my favourite basses (Status Electro, Yammy BBP, Ray and Bogarts) are all between 9 and 10.5 lbs. I do not look forward to swapping them for 7/8 lbs basses unless I have to so hopefully exercise will be enough.

Feel free to ignore me, but speaking from experience, I would think very seriously about continuing to use basses in the 10lb region. Because eventually, given you’ve already started with back issues, they are likely to exacerbate them. Obviously my situation is somewhat different, but if I put on a 10lb bass my legs go numb and I get highly unpleasant nerve pain through my abdomen, to say nothing of other issues I won’t mention here. Trust me, you do not want to end up there; no bass on earth is worth it. 

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Good news that its manageable. As a simple quick change get a Gruvgear duo strap. When i had back problems i used one for approx 6mths and once my back muscles had strengthened thru exercise i dropped the extra strap from it and now used as a normal bass strap which is by far the comfiest one i've ever had. 

Bass Direct is where i got mine. They come in different lengths too.

image.jpeg.a98838f61521c69dde1c3751998d4fa1.jpeg

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On 02/11/2019 at 10:07, dmccombe7 said:

 

 

This is gold btw! Some really good stuff.

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Harry, forget the GruvGear Duo Strap, I've met you and, like me, you have large shoulders and are tall. Even with the longer Duo Strap to its maximum length, you'll be playing with the bass right under your chin. I bought one and gave it to a friend on the very next day. Furthermore it won't balance the weight at all as you have a serious scoliosis, just like me, minus my other back injuries (66% crippled because of that. Some days I can hardly move)...

The strap made by @solo4652 is way far better.

When I see my rheumatologist, 3 or 4 times a year, he always looks at my scoliosis saying : Ah yes, it's the young man who makes you dizzy when you look at his back. 🤣

By the way, I'm 54 years old with a completely destroyed back due to a severe car crash in 2009 while making my job as a medical advisor...

Concerning scoliosis, we all have one, because we all have a shorter leg. You can live with it without any problem, but being a bassist and having something too heavy on one shoulder will severely exacerbate this scoliosis.

Are there solutions? Yes!

The obvious one is correcting your posture with adapted exercices and wearing an orthopedic insole to compensate for that spine deviation originated way down under.

Making some fitness is certainly a good idea, just like what @Happy Jack is explaining in his video.

Avoid classical medication or start looking for a new liver...

Playing sitting without any strap is also a very good idea, and using a foot rest with the bass between your legs will release the tensions on the back.

If you also have too powerful muscles pulling on your spine, working on your posture is the first thing to do (it's my main problem linked to my heavy scoliosis).

Going light is simply mandatory if you still want to play standing.

If you decide to make some sport(s), don't run as you'll finish the work and end up in a wheel chair. Swimming or nordic walking are the best choices, but just walking is already very good. Cycling is good too, but not on a Dutch bike as you'll compress your spine disks by the wrong posture (ultra straight vertical spine). So a standard non Dutch bike is best, because leaning forward will release the spine disks pressure. Also avoid all schocks on your spine and remember that your car is your enemy.

And go see a nutritionist as food is important too.

PM or WhatsApp me if you want more information.

Edited by Hellzero
Never type before falling asleep...
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13 hours ago, HazBeen said:

This is gold btw! Some really good stuff.

The man's a legend on BC. Think he plays bass as well. :laugh1:

Seriously one of the god guys on here.

Dave

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10 hours ago, Hellzero said:

Harry, forget the GruvGear Duo Strap, I've met you and, like me, you have large shoulders and are tall. Even with the longer Duo Strap to its maximum length, you'll be playing with the bass right under your chin. I bought one and gave it to a friend on the very next day. Furthermore it won't balance the weight at all as you have a serious scoliosis, just like me, minus my other back injuries (66% crippled because of that. Some days I can hardly move)...

The strap made by @solo4652 is way far better.

When I see my rheumatologist, 3 or 4 times a year, he always looks at my scoliosis saying : Ah yes, it's the young man who makes you dizzy when you look at his back. 🤣

By the way, I'm 54 years old with a completely destroyed back due to a severe car crash in 2009 while making my job as a medical advisor...

Concerning scoliosis, we all have one, because we all have a shorter leg. You can live with it without any problem, but being a bassist and having something too heavy on one shoulder will severely exacerbate this scoliosis.

Are there solutions? Yes!

The obvious one is correcting your posture with adapted exercices and wearing an orthopedic insole to compensate for that spine deviation originated way down under.

Making some fitness is certainly a good idea, just like what Happy Jack is explaining in his video.

Avoid classical medication or start looking for a new liver...

Playing sitting without any strap is also a very good idea, and using a foot rest with the bass between your legs will release the tensions on the back.

If you also have too powerful muscles pulling on your spine, working on your posture is the first thing to do (it's my main problem linked to my heavy scoliosis).

Going light is simply mandatory if you still want to play standing.

If you decide to make some sport(s), don't run as you'll finish the work and end up in a wheel chair. Swimming or nordic walking are the best choices, but just walking is already very good. Cycling is good too, but not on a Dutch bike as you'll compress your spine disks by the wrong posture (ultra straight vertical spine). So a standard non Dutch bike is best, because leaning forward will release the spine disks pressure. Also avoid all schocks on your spine and remember that your car is your enemy.

And go see a nutritionist as food is important too.

PM or WhatsApp me if you want more information.

Sounds like you're on top of your issues. Lot of great info in this.

Dave

Edited by dmccombe7
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13 hours ago, dmccombe7 said:

Seriously one of the god guys on here.

Please try not to inflate his ego too much... 😉😛😄

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