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Glastonbury Festival


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4 hours ago, YouMa said:

I know this because of my girlfriends daughters who are both in bands nicking all my 90s vinyl and basically refusing to listen to most things past this. I feel slightly smug about this.

 

But most of those 90s bands, certainly on the indie scene were drawing their influence from 60s stuff, especially the Beatles, and punk from the 70s, maybe with a bit of Bowie thrown in.

 

So isn't that just a case of 'the more things change...'?

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Personally I think the big change at Glastonbury happened with Britpop,

 

The festivàl was still mainly showcasing 'alternative' and 'indie' bands just as it had been doing since the mid 80s, but mainstream music tastes shifted so that for a while some of the those bands were were amongst the best selling acts in the UK, so Glastonbury, which on any given year would feature most of the biggest indie bands suddenly started getting a lot more attention from the mainstream media

 

It also didn't hurt that Glastonbury was also quick to embrace the exploding EDM/rave scene with acts like Orbital starting to headline the Pyramid stage.

 

It was almost a case of the mainstream moving to embrace Glastonbury rather than the other way round.

 

Once that happened the festival started to attract more and more acts who were outside that 'indie' clique it which eventually led to headliners like Beyonce and Kanye.

 

As I said before I went every year it was on during the 90s and even though it's a very different beast now and my camping in a sweaty tent days are long gone, I still get pangs of almost homesickness when it's on now.

Edited by Cato
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9 minutes ago, Cato said:

Personally I think the big change at Glastonbury happened with Britpop,

 

The festivàl was still mainly showcases 'alternative' and 'indie' bands just as it had been doing since the mid 80s, but mainstream musoc tastes shifted so that for a while some of the those bands,  were were amongst the best selling acts in the UK, so Glastonbury, which on any given years would feature most of the biggest bands suddenly started getting a lot more attention from the mainstream media

 

It also didn't hurt that Glastonbury was also quick to embrace the exploding EDM/rave scene with acts like Orbital starting ro headline the Pyramid stage.

 

It was almost a case of the mainstream moving to embrace Glastonbury rather than the other way round.

 

Once that happened the festival started to attract more and more acts who were outside that 'indie' clique it which eventually led to headliners like Beyonce and Kanye.

 

As I said before I went every year it was on during the 90s and even though it's a very different beast now and my camping in a sweaty tent days are long gone, I still get pangs of almost homesickness when it's on now.

This is all true but the really big change IMO was the transition from a travellers free festival to an organised profitable business. I can’t remember the full details but the clashes between the private security firm and travellers that caused the event to be cancelled for a year. When it returned there were police on site with better organisation and more infrastructure. Progressively more technology, fencing and perimeters were needed to stem the tide of ticketless punters. Glastonbury rapidly got organised in the early 90’s attracting bigger names (not just bands but vendors and investors).  

Edited by tegs07
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13 hours ago, Barking Spiders said:

Au contraire, my main criticism concerns the booking of old lags who should've been pensioned off yonks ago; MacCartney, Diana Ross, Plant & Krauss, Noel Gallagher, Skunk Anansie, Pet Shop Boys, Crowded House..plus loads of over the hill indie type bands who've been around for years e.g. Libertines, Supergrass, Elbow, Jesus and Mary Chain (whose 80s stuff I still play), Primal Scream (who were always gash except when Andrew Weatherall produced their music), the Damned.... The acts that would interest me more are younger ones like Sam Fender and Sigrid (my personal fave).

Whit? Plant and Krauss together are pure magic! They do have a brand new album out and their performance will undoubtedly be something very special.  

 

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Half of the buzz of the Glasto experience has always been about what you bring to it.

If you go and don't have a great time you need to take a good look in the mirror, and/or find a new circle of friends...

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1 hour ago, tegs07 said:

This is all true but the really big change IMO was the transition from a travellers free festival to an organised profitable business. I can’t remember the full details but the clashes between the private security firm and travellers that caused the event to be cancelled for a year. When it returned there were police on site with better organisation and more infrastructure. Progressively more technology, fencing and perimeters were needed to stem the tide of ticketless punters. Glastonbury rapidly got organised in the early 90’s attracting bigger names (not just bands but vendors and investors).  

I've played at Priston Social Club ( of which the Eavises are members) Somewhere on my phone are photos displayed in the Club of all the early Glastonbury Posters listing the lineups,  from the first one right through. They make interesting reading.

On the subject of fencing, one of my daughters used to go down to Glasto every year without a ticket and her and a group of mates just used to climb over. With the advent of better security that stopped!

Edited by yorks5stringer
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1 hour ago, miles'tone said:

Whit? Plant and Krauss together are pure magic! They do have a brand new album out and their performance will undoubtedly be something very special.  

 

Agree 100%, I've got their latest Tiny Desk on repeat play, just looking at all the different cool guitars makes my hairs stand on end, never mind the performances. We hope to be covering 'Can't let Go' in our set soon.

 

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I've no wish to go to Glastonbury, even Rebellion is too big for me these days, last time I went I spent most of my time in the pub round the corner, I can't remember the last time I really enjoyed going to see a (name) band, I usually get bored after 15 minutes  and leave at the end feeling thoroughly unfulfilled, yes, I've turned into my Dad

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10 minutes ago, yorks5stringer said:

On the subject of fencing, one of my daughtere used to go down to Glasto every year without a ticket and her and a group of mates just used to climb over. With the advent of better security that stopped!

Edited 3 minutes ago by

 

One year some of my uni friends were scouting the perimeter fence, looking for a good place to climb over or burrow under when they bumped into Michael Eavis on a tractor.

 

Who proceeded to to load them into his trailer and drove them into the festival for free.

 

I think back in the day once his costs were covered by ticket sales he didn't really care if people were getting in free.

 

It was only when it started to get dangerously over crowded in front of the big stages that he put up the mega fence around 2000.

Edited by Cato
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2 minutes ago, Cato said:

 

One year some of my uni friends were scouting the perimeter fence, looking for a good place to climb over or burrow under when they bumped into Michael Eavis on a tractor.

 

Who proceeded to to load them into his trailer and drove them into the festival for free.

 

I think back in the day once his costs were covered he didn't really care if people were getting in free.

 

It was only when it started ro get dangerously over crowded in front of the big stages that he put up the mega fence around 2000.

Whenever there is music at The Priston Club he comes down (in his shorts!) and chats to bands. I was with a band who did 'What's so funny about peace, love and understanding' by Elvis C and he asked us if that we wrote it!

Edited by yorks5stringer
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18 hours ago, Cato said:

 

 

 

It may not be appealing to middle age Basschatters (and I include myself in that demographic) but doubt there'll be a stronger line up at any other European festival this year.

 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Stofferson said:

image.thumb.png.0238c3489938d659b17b174bc3a18a2b.png

 

Bloody hell.

 

I was listening to most of those headliners 30 years ago during my teenage metal years.

 

I'd heard that no bands had come through to join the big boys for a long time, but that really brings it home.

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According to Rod Liddle in today’s Spectator, the average age of punters is 40 (and of performers is 50).

I suspect they are trying to change this - probably before all the middle-aged regulars lose their hearing (or they find out how much they will have to pay for their kids to go to university).

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28 minutes ago, Tokalo said:

According to Rod Liddle in today’s Spectator, the average age of punters is 40 (and of performers is 50).

I suspect they are trying to change this - probably before all the middle-aged regulars lose their hearing (or they find out how much they will have to pay for their kids to go to university).

 

Rod Liddle is a professional joy vampire so I'd be more shocked if he actually admitted looking forwards to something.

 

Taking a straight average age of attendees is deceptive because, although some people do take young kids the numbers of under 18s attending is tiny.

 

So the average gets dragged up by the those attendees who continue to go in their 40s, 50s and 60s with almost no under 18s to balance it in the other direction.

 

What it doesn't mean is that most attendees are over 40.

 

It would be more informative to look at the median statistics for attendees, or just by numbers from each age group.

 

I suspect the single biggest demographic of attendees would be in the 18 to 30 range.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Cato said:

I suspect the single biggest demographic of attendees would be in the 18 to 30 range.

 

 

 

That seems about right to me. Maybe 25 -35. Who knows

I have met someone there who was 93 and waiting for Idles to come on. He had been going since the very first festival. Didn't once say it was better in his day.

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38 minutes ago, Cato said:

I suspect the single biggest demographic of attendees would be in the 18 to 30 range.

 

 

I've been twice, when I was 29 and when I was 35, which simultaneously proves and refutes your hypothesis. My good friend Dr Schrödinger agreed with me, then didn't.

 

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Sitting in a field isn't how I want to consume my music, but large or small, I think festivals are a great thing. I'm playing at a couple of local festivals next month. Friends went to Glasto every year for decades. They went for the experience as much as the music.

 

The last big festival I went to was Reading 1973. I'm afraid I can't take most of the DJ/presenters on the TV coverage of Glasto, so I don't keep up with who's appearing.

Edited by chris_b
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1 hour ago, chris_b said:

Sitting in a field isn't how I want to consume my music, but large or small, I think festivals are a great thing. I'm playing at a couple of local festivals next month. Friends went to Glasto every year for decades. They went for the experience as much as the music.

 

Exactly. To each his/her own. When I went to festivals (a long time ago), it was the experience I enjoyed. Heard some good music (and some bad), but that was almost by the bye.

 

Now I'm ancient and don't fancy going, I'm certainly not going to moan or snark about the whole thing. Live and let live.

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3 hours ago, PaulWarning said:

I've no wish to go to Glastonbury, even Rebellion is too big for me these days, last time I went I spent most of my time in the pub round the corner, I can't remember the last time I really enjoyed going to see a (name) band, I usually get bored after 15 minutes  and leave at the end feeling thoroughly unfulfilled, yes, I've turned into my Dad

 

I have that too - was discussing it with a friend that went to download. The idea of going to a festival is always better than the practicallity of going for me, some with most gigs, I have a low attention threshold. I have no idea how anyone wants to see a band play for more than an hour (our sets are about 3 hours - no idea why people stay, luckily they aren't like me!)

 

1 hour ago, SteveXFR said:

I have met someone there who was 93 and waiting for Idles to come on. He had been going since the very first festival. Didn't once say it was better in his day.

 

He probably couldn't remember.

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3 hours ago, PaulWarning said:

I've no wish to go to Glastonbury, even Rebellion is too big for me these days, last time I went I spent most of my time in the pub round the corner, I can't remember the last time I really enjoyed going to see a (name) band, I usually get bored after 15 minutes  and leave at the end feeling thoroughly unfulfilled, yes, I've turned into my Dad

Yeah, last time we were at Rebellion I spent more time talking to people & socialising backstage than I did watching bands. And when I did watch bands it was usually from side stage rather than out front as I found the sound to be better there.

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It all went wrong when they changed the name from Pilton Pop Festival to Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts. 

It's closer to Shepton Mallet than Glastonbury but I guess Shepton isn't as mystical.

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2 hours ago, SteveXFR said:

It all went wrong when they changed the name from Pilton Pop Festival to Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts. 

It's closer to Shepton Mallet than Glastonbury but I guess Shepton isn't as mystical.

I had to check and you are right by quite a margin, over 4 miles!

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I went a couple of times: 85-ish and 93-ish. Had a great time, but even then the headline acts were too mainstream for me.

But lots of good stuff in the smaller areas.

 

I think Glasto is now a bit of a vanity project for the really big names.... something for the bucket list for the performer (and the punter too).

And a lot of the attendees are not hardcore music fans, they just want to have fun.

 

 

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