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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Manny said:

Great thread & good luck with the build @WHUFC BASS

Will you be able to get a drum kit in there? Is that the plan? 

Hoping to but it all depends on how loud it is. Worst case will be an electronic kit but I'd rather have an acoustic kit in there.

Edited by WHUFC BASS
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  • 4 weeks later...

Finally have a door and a window installed. The door is a composite door with added security locks. Quite hefty with some soundproofing.

Electrician came round yesterday routed the wiring which will allow me to do the roof and wall insulation too.

I also started painting the studio. Word of advice, if you're going to be paint porous blockwork with a paintbrush, don't bother. Much better to invest in a spray gun which can get into all the pores of the block work. Wish I'd have known this earlier. It would have saved a lot of graft.

door_1.jpeg

window.jpeg

door_2.jpeg

window_2.jpeg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Looking fantastic well done, been really enjoying seeing the updates.

When I boarded out my detached garage extension (Basically another 4m extension on the end) I used battened the brick walls with 2x1 and screwed 75mm PIR insulation to the battens, then used foil tape to create the continuous vapour barrier before covering with OSB. I had a double layer of PIR on the ceiling, put 100mm between the ceiling joists, filled in any gaps with expanding foam and then overlaid the whole lot with 25mm before covering with 12mm OSB.

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1 hour ago, Dad3353 said:

I trust adequate ventilation has been factored in..? Condensation, damp; the air needs to be renewed in some way. Just sayin'; s'looking good. B|

I was thinking the same thing. Would now be the time to install air-con? I can imagine that being a sauna in the summer :)

 

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3 hours ago, Bassybert said:

Looking fantastic well done, been really enjoying seeing the updates.

When I boarded out my detached garage extension (Basically another 4m extension on the end) I used battened the brick walls with 2x1 and screwed 75mm PIR insulation to the battens, then used foil tape to create the continuous vapour barrier before covering with OSB. I had a double layer of PIR on the ceiling, put 100mm between the ceiling joists, filled in any gaps with expanding foam and then overlaid the whole lot with 25mm before covering with 12mm OSB.

I've used 100mm phenolic board in the ceiling. It's a cold roof and I've used Gapotape to fill in the gaps.

Oh and how messy is expanding foam? LOL!

3 hours ago, MacDaddy said:

Not sure why, but I'm reminded of that programme 'Dexter'?  ;) 

You're not the first person who's said that! 😂

2 hours ago, Marc S said:

Seriously good looking build @WHUFC BASS 
I'm so envious :) 

Thanks mate!

1 hour ago, Dad3353 said:

I trust adequate ventilation has been factored in..? Condensation, damp; the air needs to be renewed in some way. Just sayin'; s'looking good. B|

 

1 hour ago, Dad3353 said:

I trust adequate ventilation has been factored in..? Condensation, damp; the air needs to be renewed in some way. Just sayin'; s'looking good. B|

Well there's a big window in there for starters and there's trickle vents on the window for when it's closed.

10 minutes ago, sammybee said:

I was thinking the same thing. Would now be the time to install air-con? I can imagine that being a sauna in the summer :)

Not installing air-con because surprisingly due to the insulation in the roof it'll keep at a constant temperature. It's surprisingly cool in summer and I've been in there on the hottest days of the year and it's pleasantly cool. I'll be installing a wall heater for winter when it may get chilly. There's lots of insulation in the cavity (100mm Rockwool) and 50mm acoustic insulation on the interior wall.

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On 07/05/2021 at 22:18, WHUFC BASS said:

Hoping to but it all depends on how loud it is. Worst case will be an electronic kit but I'd rather have an acoustic kit in there.

Why not compromise and buy a really good electronic kit?  They sound so good. I know a drummer who uses an acoustic kit live but his bass drum pedal is an electronic one. He hides it behind an acoustic bass drum. His bass thud is awesome.

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2 hours ago, ubit said:

Why not compromise and buy a really good electronic kit?  They sound so good. I know a drummer who uses an acoustic kit live but his bass drum pedal is an electronic one. He hides it behind an acoustic bass drum. His bass thud is awesome.

You would not believe the look on drummer's faces at the mere mention of an electronic kit. I've touted the idea with three drummers that I know and they all say that they're crap, the don't feel real and are difficult to adapt to for recording. I think they're just making excuses personally LOL!

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, WHUFC BASS said:

You would not believe the look on drummer's faces at the mere mention of an electronic kit. I've touted the idea with three drummers that I know and they all say that they're crap, the don't feel real and are difficult to adapt to for recording. I think they're just making excuses personally LOL!

We used to rehearse in my spare bedroom. I bought a cheap electronic kit for practice. Our drummer loved it and said I have to get one of these. They are ideal for rehearsal and when you go really top of the range they sound incredible. I think it's a case of getting used to them. I'm not a drummer but I am just going by what our drummer said.

 

Edit- Some professional bands use them so they must be ok.

Edited by ubit
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1 hour ago, ubit said:

We used to rehearse in my spare bedroom. I bought a cheap electronic kit for practice. Our drummer loved it and said I have to get one of these. They are ideal for rehearsal and when you go really top of the range they sound incredible. I think it's a case of getting used to them. I'm not a drummer but I am just going by what our drummer said.

 

Edit- Some professional bands use them so they must be OK.

From what I can gather from drummer's comments, the kits with mesh heads are more natural feeling but apparently still aren't a patch on the real thing. It's certainly something I'll be looking at.

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3 hours ago, WHUFC BASS said:

From what I can gather from drummer's comments, the kits with mesh heads are more natural feeling but apparently still aren't a patch on the real thing. It's certainly something I'll be looking at.

I'm an 'old-school' (and old :$ ...) drummer, with an excellent 'L.A. Camco' acoustic kit. For practical reasons, I reluctantly bought a modest Alesis Nitro mesh kit for our new practise room. Not too expensive, and quite decent sounds for practising. I was impressed enough to add a modest laptop, and now use the kit to trigger Superior Drummer 3, and it sounds wonderful, with the bonus of being able to change kits to suit the song..! Great for recording, either as audio, or MIDI, or a mix of the two. The only real advantage of mesh heads, for a decent drummer, is for the snare, where top response is needed. Most drummers will prefer mesh for the toms, too, of course, and that's a Good Thing, but the snare is where it's at. Perfection, then, would be an acoustic-type snare triggering the e-drum snare; there are several that do this (top-end Roland, of course, and others...), so a top-end snare on a modest mesh kit would bring a smile to all but the most recalcitrant of drummers. I still play the Camco, of course, but, if and when we play out next, I'm seriously considering using the Alesis, for its ease of break-down and transport, plus the tonal flexibility and quality that Superior Drummer offers. Expensive..? Quite a lot less than the equivalent quality acoustic kit, certainly, doubly so if consideration is given to the huge range of cymbals available. My acoustic cymbals alone (Païste, Sabian, Meinl...) cost over £2000 new, so it soon mounts up.
Just sayin'; hope this helps. :friends:

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On 09/07/2021 at 14:28, Dad3353 said:

I'm an 'old-school' (and old :$ ...) drummer, with an excellent 'L.A. Camco' acoustic kit. For practical reasons, I reluctantly bought a modest Alesis Nitro mesh kit for our new practise room. Not too expensive, and quite decent sounds for practising. I was impressed enough to add a modest laptop, and now use the kit to trigger Superior Drummer 3, and it sounds wonderful, with the bonus of being able to change kits to suit the song..! Great for recording, either as audio, or MIDI, or a mix of the two. The only real advantage of mesh heads, for a decent drummer, is for the snare, where top response is needed. Most drummers will prefer mesh for the toms, too, of course, and that's a Good Thing, but the snare is where it's at. Perfection, then, would be an acoustic-type snare triggering the e-drum snare; there are several that do this (top-end Roland, of course, and others...), so a top-end snare on a modest mesh kit would bring a smile to all but the most recalcitrant of drummers. I still play the Camco, of course, but, if and when we play out next, I'm seriously considering using the Alesis, for its ease of break-down and transport, plus the tonal flexibility and quality that Superior Drummer offers. Expensive..? Quite a lot less than the equivalent quality acoustic kit, certainly, doubly so if consideration is given to the huge range of cymbals available. My acoustic cymbals alone (Païste, Sabian, Meinl...) cost over £2000 new, so it soon mounts up.
Just sayin'; hope this helps. :friends:

That's really good to know and thanks for the info.

It's funny, I was talking to our drummer yesterday about electric kits and he said that his main bug-bear was the bass drum. He found that there was no "kick back" (his words, not mine) like you were hitting a wall with the beater, whereas on an acoustic kit you get some rebound. He also stated that on most of the electric kits he's played, you get some excessive rebound from the snare and toms  which takes some getting used to. He did concede that he range of sounds was a plus with an electric kit though, just as you've pointed out here.

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