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HughRichardson

Bassist And Drummer Relationship - Three Things You MUST Know!

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Hey guys! 

I just finished a new video on the bassist and drummer relationship. 

It's got three things in which I personally feel all bass players should know but I'd love to hear what you guys think too!

Take a look and let me know :)

 

Cheers,

 

Hugh

 

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Excellent.

Something that might be worth adding, as fundamental advice for a bassist or a drummer, is to sync up the bass and the bass drum. If they're not in sync, the rhythm can sound weak and disjointed, when they're in sync even very simple and sparse arrangements can sound very powerful. 

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4 hours ago, gjones said:

Excellent.

Something that might be worth adding, as fundamental advice for a bassist or a drummer, is to sync up the bass and the bass drum. If they're not in sync, the rhythm can sound weak and disjointed, when they're in sync even very simple and sparse arrangements can sound very powerful. 

Great point!

I’ve got a follow up video in mind which is gonna get into more specific techniques and then this video will serve as a general overview. 

 

I’ll be sure to add this point 😊

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12 hours ago, gjones said:

Excellent.

Something that might be worth adding, as fundamental advice for a bassist or a drummer, is to sync up the bass and the bass drum. If they're not in sync, the rhythm can sound weak and disjointed, when they're in sync even very simple and sparse arrangements can sound very powerful. 

Most definitely good advice, similarly and for added variety, I like to sometimes lock in with the snare. :)

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@HughRichardson good video.

Fo my 2 pence worth as you go along the videos I would accentuate the presence of space more, you do mention it briefly but it can be incredibly powerful, as can a driving bassline.  Also it does depend on the genre is music.

Classic bass line driving a song:-

classic example of space and letting the kick and snare go together too:-

 

i would also touch on EQ of the bass just out of the kick zone to blend but also differentiate enough.

Just a few more from my POV

cheers

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I liked the video. Good for a refresher of what we should be doing. Gave me the idea to work specifically on fills with the drummer so that we are more in sync. We both like to chuck in fills here and there but we need to be doing it together and also being more coordinated about what we play and what feel we create. 

Good video, right length for getting the point across. Thank you!

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15 hours ago, gjones said:

Excellent.

Something that might be worth adding, as fundamental advice for a bassist or a drummer, is to sync up the bass and the bass drum. If they're not in sync, the rhythm can sound weak and disjointed, when they're in sync even very simple and sparse arrangements can sound very powerful. 

that might of been true originally but I don't think many rock bassists lock in with the bass drum, it's more about the feel of the groove of the song, I can never hear the bass drum with all the racket going off on stage, locking in with the drummer means playing a the same tempo and going with the fills on occasions.

Playing with just one guitar my job is the give the song definition not just the bass drum IMO of course

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15 hours ago, gjones said:

Excellent.

Something that might be worth adding, as fundamental advice for a bassist or a drummer, is to sync up the bass and the bass drum. If they're not in sync, the rhythm can sound weak and disjointed, when they're in sync even very simple and sparse arrangements can sound very powerful. 

I can remember, when I started playing on bands, I used to make a point of watching the kick drum to make sure I was playing in synch with it.

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Also does he stand his round. My mate, our guitarist used to dissapear every time it was his round. We started doing a kitty and lo and behold he was always on hand whenever the rounds were coming 

Edited by ubit

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Eye contact is a biggie too, that and presenting a united front when the guitarist suggests “freebird” or similar. 

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7 hours ago, paul_5 said:

Eye contact is a biggie too, that and presenting a united front when the guitarist suggests “freebird” or similar. 

The freebird moment requires the greatest unity of all 🤣🤣

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