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Mickyk

Looking to upgrade from AN Ibanez sr 300eb to a Yamaha BB424x.

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Hello there,I'm looking to upgrade my current Ibanez SR300EB which i have been playing for about 6 months,nothing against it ,only i want to try playing some Slap Bass soon and gave it a whirl on the Ibanez but couldn't seem to get the hang of it,so i'm looking at the Yamaha which is just about in my price bracket.
?You lads on here think much about the Yamaha BB424X and do think that i could get to play slap a bit easier using this guitar.
Or am i jumping the gun a tad.

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The 424x is a fantastic instrument imho particularly in its price bracket. My view on learning a style such as slap is that you learn it on whatever instrument you have. If you change the instrument you adapt the style to fit that new instrument. Personally i would persevere with the Ibanez and get the foundations of the slap style with that. Then maybe if you want the Yam go for it but keep changing instruments in my opinion won't help you learn.

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[quote name='Number6' timestamp='1489615715' post='3258463']
The 424x is a fantastic instrument imho particularly in its price bracket. My view on learning a style such as slap is that you learn it on whatever instrument you have. If you change the instrument you adapt the style to fit that new instrument. Personally i would persevere with the Ibanez and get the foundations of the slap style with that. Then maybe if you want the Yam go for it but keep changing instruments in my opinion won't help you learn.
[/quote]
Thanks for the reply,i take your point maybe will give it another go on the Ibanez.
?Which do you think is the better Bass between a Yamaha bb424x,and a Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass 70s

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There shouldn't be any reason why you cannot slap with the Ibanez, it is perfectly capable, the only bass I can think of that probably wouldn't suit slap is a Rickenbacker but no doubt someone will be along in a minute with a video of a Rick being slapped within an inch of it's life!

The Yamaha has a cracking reputation, I doubt you would regret buying one

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+1 for slap being fine on the SR300. I actually purchased one for that very reason (since I have nylon strings on my main bass - that you cannot slap properly).

If you want really convincing evidence then check out Mark from Talking Bass who often uses an SR and plays some very impressive slap lines indeed. By all means go for the Yammaha as I'm sure it would be a great bass, but don't fall into the trap of thinking that a new purchase will do in place of learning to play properly. Done that myself and I assure you it does not work :D

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Posted (edited)
The only thing that's a deal beaker when it comes to whether you can slap on a bass is pickup placement.

If there is a pickup right up against the end of the fretboard or very close to it as you get with some basses, then it's probably going to obstruct your popping technique.

Other than that the world is your mollusc

The Yamaha is a brilliant all round bass, I came within a whisker if buying a 1024x a couple of months ago. Edited by Cato

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[quote name='Mickyk' timestamp='1489682205' post='3258962']
Thanks for the reply,i take your point maybe will give it another go on the Ibanez.
?Which do you think is the better Bass between a Yamaha bb424x,and a Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass 70s
[/quote]

I would take the Yamaha any day as the BB is my favourite bass, but for slap you can't beat a Jazz or a Stingray, IMHO. A SUB Ray4 should make your shortlist too!

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Agree to a certain extent as regards slapping my sr 300,maybe it's just my technique ,i saw a video on youtube of a girl, Martha i think her name is and she was using a Yam 424 with great effect,playing the Patrice Rushen track,Forget me Nots a song which i like a lot and always wanted to learn,but cannot seem to make the right sounds slapping with my Ibanez sr300,maybe i need more practise,it was just that i am sold on that Yam 424x.

Some great replies guys cheers for them,i am open to more suggestions however.

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How are you balancing the pickups on the SR300?

For a 'classic' slap tone I'd probably start with both pickups on full, if you decide you need more bass roll off the bridge pickup slightly, if you want more treble roll off the neck pickup.

Might be worth turning down the mids a tad at the amp, whilst boosting the bass and treble, if that's an option for you.

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I've previously owned a Ibanez SR300, Squier VM Jazz and currently own a Yamaha BB425. I'd take the Yamaha over any of those every time.

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To learn slap I'd suggest a bass that can have the action relatively low (especially on the low E and A), and fairly light gauge strings. Maybe you'd want to check those variables on the Ibanez. The SR series typically have a very thin neck - when you are starting out it may make it difficult to hit the strings cleanly, but it may be an advantage for people with small hands.

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Try some Dunlop Super Bright steels or their Marcus Miller set while you're at it. They are very flexible which makes it so much easier to play slap with minimal effort!

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I used this group of videos by our own Scott Whitley when I started to learn to play slap:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GObmwIYwnMQ

By the time you get to lesson 4 you should pretty much have it down to a T anyway - it's basically a technique which just needs repetition.

Get your bass set up (as low as) by somebody who knows what they're doing, some light strings (35-90s are superb when you start) possibly a [b]compressor [/b]and/or a [size=4][color=#333333]Envelope Filter[/color][/size]. After that it's just "practice, practice, practice".

Can't see where you are - I'm sure you'll find somebody nearby who can help out so think about posting your location.

Good luck

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Posted (edited)
http://youtu.be/tGilCW0_Jf0

I can't recommend this series of tutorials strongly enough.

The most important slap lesson, which comes later in the series concerns muted percussive strikes (ghost notes).

Slap bass is all about the ghost notes. Edited by Cato

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[quote name='Mickyk' timestamp='1489686752' post='3259022']
Agree to a certain extent as regards slapping my sr 300,maybe it's just my technique ,i saw a video on youtube of a girl, Martha i think her name is and she was using a Yam 424 with great effect,playing the Patrice Rushen track,Forget me Nots a song which i like a lot and always wanted to learn,but cannot seem to make the right sounds slapping with my Ibanez sr300,maybe i need more practise,it was just that i am sold on that Yam 424x.

Some great replies guys cheers for them,i am open to more suggestions however.
[/quote]

Are you going to do a lot of slap? I'd recommend looking for a set of super wound strings. They're the ones with just the core wire going over the saddles, the windings (round wound) start between the bridge and bridge pup. Very bright and good sustain. Hard to get these days I think but a real sound from the eighties.

Is this the clip that you saw?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRusbYIyRNI

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[quote name='SpondonBassed' timestamp='1489702331' post='3259157']



Is this the clip that you saw?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRusbYIyRNI
[/quote]

I'm going to be careful here, because that technique obviously works superbly well for her, but personally I'd try to keep the thumb parallel with the strings, rather than pointing downwards.

If I tried to copy that technique I'd be hitting strings I don't want to hit with the upper part of my thumb.

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[quote name='dannybuoy' timestamp='1489699538' post='3259130']
Try some Dunlop Super Bright steels or their Marcus Miller set while you're at it. They are very flexible which makes it so much easier to play slap with minimal effort!
[/quote]

Just Ordered a set of those strings,worth a try.[quote name='Cato' timestamp='1489690916' post='3259050']
How are you balancing the pickups on the SR300?

For a 'classic' slap tone I'd probably start with both pickups on full, if you decide you need more bass roll off the bridge pickup slightly, if you want more treble roll off the neck pickup.

Might be worth turning down the mids a tad at the amp, whilst boosting the bass and treble, if that's an option for you.
[/quote]

I have the tap switch set to the middle,and on the amp i have the treble right down and the middle with bass turned fully up.[quote name='TheGreek' timestamp='1489700416' post='3259139']
I used this group of videos by our own Scott Whitley when I started to learn to play slap:

[url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GObmwIYwnMQ"]https://www.youtube....h?v=GObmwIYwnMQ[/url]

By the time you get to lesson 4 you should pretty much have it down to a T anyway - it's basically a technique which just needs repetition.

Get your bass set up (as low as) by somebody who knows what they're doing, some light strings (35-90s are superb when you start) possibly a [b]compressor [/b]and/or a [color=#333333]Envelope Filter[/color]. After that it's just "practice, practice, practice".

Can't see where you are - I'm sure you'll find somebody nearby who can help out so think about posting your location.

Good luck
[/quote]

I'm based in the Derby area.


[quote name='SpondonBassed' timestamp='1489702331' post='3259157']
Are you going to do a lot of slap? I'd recommend looking for a set of super wound strings. They're the ones with just the core wire going over the saddles, the windings (round wound) start between the bridge and bridge pup. Very bright and good sustain. Hard to get these days I think but a real sound from the eighties.

Is this the clip that you saw?
[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRusbYIyRNI[/media]
[/quote]

Yes mate thats the clip,very easy to take ones eyes off of the bass i might add :D

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[quote name='Roger2611' timestamp='1489684612' post='3258998']
The Yamaha has a cracking reputation, I doubt you would regret buying one
[/quote]

Seconded, my bb424x is a lovely thing indeed; it's better than I'll ever be.

And the bb's seem to be permanently popular basses, so should you decide to move it on when the gas kicks in again it'll be an easy thing to sell.

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[quote name='Phil Adams' timestamp='1489685392' post='3259005']
C'mon chaps. The man has GAS!
There is only one known cure........
[/quote]

Absolutely. The must be some research suggesting that buying a Yamaha improves your slap performance by over 87%.

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Well i did take the plunge and i ended up buying a Yamaha BB424,i've had it just a week and i'm loving it,i also bought some Marcus Miller Strings as well but i've yet to fit them,just a quick question,whilst i was playing around a bit with the current strings trying to get a sound something like a slap,i failed miserably so when i fit the new one s?would it be advisable to lower the strings a tad, if so at what sort of clearance should i be at to enable a proper slap sound.Thanks in advance.

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Personally I'd get into the repetitive practice before throwing money at it, but I'm a tight northerner ;).
My recollection of learning the basic technique (in the 80's!) pre YouTube, was that after hours, possibly days of thumping away it suddenly seemed to click and feel right. Same with ghost notes and muting, don't forget the muting!
Keep practicing and your own style/technique/hand shape will develop.
The thing I struggle with now is adjusting it to different bridge spacings, but that's probably because I won't push myself to persevere when I can easily pick up another bass that suits me more.
Enjoy the Yamaha!

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Posted (edited)
As long as the action isn't super high it shouldn't really affect your ability to slap.

The sound is all in the technique ( well some of it us in the pickup balance and the amp eq but most of it is technique).

As said above slapping is all about the ghost notes and the muting, once you crack that it's just a matter of practising to build up speed and stamina. Edited by Cato

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