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MrDaveTheBass

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Everything posted by MrDaveTheBass

  1. Me too! I learnt this last week. Great fun to play - I learnt it on fretted - just transferring over to fretless now.
  2. Surely the definitive Boogie?
  3. Hi, I haven't compared the Two10 directly with a supercompact or TC cab. I'm not much of a slapper either. However, my Two10 sounds great with clean tones - I don't use any distortion or drive with my fretless, just the pristine tone of a Markbass LM3. It's not a 'hifi' cab though - it's got a prominent hump in the low mids, and a roll-off in the treble. I f slap's your thing, you might want something with a tweeter (ughhh) 😝
  4. Interesting 30min listen on BBC Sounds: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00082dr It's all about times when your ears play tricks on you, and how you can apply them to music.
  5. Thanks for the topic Nicko, I was pondering this question only yesterday. On the two outings that our new backdrop has made so far, we've used string and duct-tape. The first time we were able to tape the backdrop to the front of a wide-screen TV. The second, we strung it from light fittings and security cameras. Neither method was ideal. I'm thinking about getting some black bootlaces and using them instead. I'm also considering sticking a hammer and a pack of nails into the gig bag, but I'm not sure how this will go down with every landlord... BTW, I used this lot, and I was very impressed with the quality and the price: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Banners-DESIGN-outdoor-printed-advertising-display/dp/B00Y6V1PAI?ref_=ast_bbp_dp
  6. I've still got a cassette of Bowel II's second Peel Session - their live version of "Evacuate" gives me the shivers even today. đŸĨ´
  7. Regatta De Blanc was the album that turned me from a guitarist into a bass player. (That, plus Outlandos D'Amour and Zenyatta Mondatta). I bought "The Police Complete" manuscript book to learn the guitar parts, and ended up learning the basslines instead.
  8. As it happens, daughter #1 sings like an angel and dances like a professional, but never took to stringed instruments. It's daughter #2 who's got my old Westone Thunder in a rack in her bedroom.
  9. Congratulations! When my first daughter was born (21 years ago this week!) the household was mostly listening to 'Big Calm' by Morcheeba and lots of Bob Marley. (The same daughter's first word was "tar", pointing at my acoustic (gui)tar hung on the wall behind me as she stood on my lap).
  10. I've recently acquired a Two10, which has successfully replaced a Genz Benz 4x10, and can hold it's own without PA support, (paired with a 500W Markbass LM3). I reckon that with a pair of One10s, you'll be fine and dandy.
  11. I did exactly this, and it was a terrible, terrible experience. They sucked all of the joy out of playing for me. ☚ī¸ Now, I'll only ever play with decent human beings. You can always improve someone's musical skills, and play to their strengths and talents, but you can never fix an rusty bullethole's bad attitude.
  12. I'm surprised that TMWHTD is only in one band - one of my MWHTD is in three. In fact in my experience, TMWHTDs are usually the worst tarts of all, touting their dirty skin-slapping skills to all and sundry. Some of them are even in multiple bands!
  13. The vast majority of 'originals' gigs I've done have been on shared stages through the venue's backline and PA. I learned the hard way though that it's a good idea to have a small rig or combo in the back of your car for personal monitoring when the house rig is broken or unavailable.
  14. Apologies! - I normally find it quite hard to GAS over cabs - they're usually a pain to lug about, and they don't come with fancy sparkle paint jobs. Even amps or pedals usually have a pretty coloured LED or two, but cabs are usually just dull heavy black boxes. I felt that I had to write a review because I've never been so blown away by a speaker cab - it totally exceeded my expectations. The Two10 has certainly cured my cab GAS for the foreseeable future (except that, if I had the readies, I'd get another one, but this would be totally unnecessary overkill for my situation, and defeat the point of a lightweight, one cab load-in). In my weaker moments though, I fantasise about two stacked vertically like a slimline portable 8 x 10 - somebody help me! 😉
  15. The dispersion is very good. I've only used the Two10 in 'portrait' mode (one speaker above the other). Last Saturday I was playing in an awkward space where we've had sound issues in the past. The drummer was jammed into this tiny inglenook fireplace with my rig beside him, while I stood out the front so that I could do BVs. For a couple of numbers where I wasn't singing, I squeezed into the fireplace with the drummer so we could better lock-in together. It didn't seem to matter if I was standing way out front or right on top of the Two10 - it sounded great wherever I was.
  16. Do you absolutely have to have a 5er? You'll find a much larger variety of 4-stringers within your budget. You could pay hundreds of dollars more for that extra B-string, and then discover that it's a very expensive thumb-rest. 😜 If that low B is essential, you could use the bottom four strings from a set of 5, and tune your bass B-E-A-D.
  17. Before buying my Two10 I looked all over t'interweb for consumer reviews, but there's not a lot out there - lots of love for its little brother the One10, which was a good sign, but not much stuff about living with the Two10 day-to-day. The one question that I struggled to find the answer to was, "Can it replace my 4 x 10?" If you're in a similar position to me - keen amateur/semi-pro tired of lugging a "normal" - (i.e. not Barefaced) 4 x 10 to pub/club gigs every weekend, I can say, "Yes! It's plenty loud enough and more." What cab is the Two10 replacing? My old cab is a Genz Benz Focus LT 410. It's light for a 4 x 10 (64 lbs), it's well designed, plenty loud and has a nice tone. OK, it's not a top-of-the-range "Uber" cab, but it's done me proud for the last three years, and I love it's tone, volume and reliability. If the current cab's so great, Why replace it? It all comes down to weight. I sustained a back injury this year, and although now on the mend, I can't manage to lug a 4 x 10 about on my own. I've always used a sack-truck, so for a flat, level load-in I managed OK, but I still had to lift my cab into my car, and any venues with stairs, steps or raised stages were becoming a very literal pain. Preconceptions Before the Two10 arrived, I hoped that despite having half the cone area of the Genz Benz, if I really cranked my amp through the Two10, I should be just about able to squeeze enough volume out of it to keep up with my loud drummer. I expected a drop in performance, but hoped that the reduced handling effort would make up for a shortfall in SPL. First Impressions I was able to A-B the Two10 against the Focus 410 in my front room. First, I played through the Genz Benz, which sounded great as usual. Without changing the controls on the bass or the amp, I swapped the Speakon lead over to the Two10, set at 4 Ohms. Bloody hell! - I didn't have an SPL meter, but to my ears at least, the Two10 sounded louder than the 4 x 10. More bass, more mids, just more of everything! I was puzzled at how this could be possible, but I guess that the Two10's 4 Ohm load was allowing my Markbass LM3 to output its full 500W, as opposed to 300W through the 8 Ohm Genz Benz. I tentatively tried cranking the amp a bit beyond front-room levels, but was forced to stop when the ornaments on the mantlepiece started to jump into the fireplace. The door burst open, and I was confronted by a very angry Mrs TheBass wanting to know what exactly the f**k I thought I was doing. Verdict - IT'S LOUD! First Gig (Quiet band) The next day I was able to try out the Two10 in more appropriate surroundings. A gig with my originals band - two clean electric guitars and a refined drummer with an above average grasp of volume and dynamics, swapping between brushes, rods and sticks. We play an eclectic set ranging from quiet acoustic ballads to heavy dub-laden ska numbers. I'm playing a fretless EB MM Sterling through the Markbass LM3, and the Two10 doesn't miss a beat. The venue has its own PA, so my rig is for stage monitoring only. One of the guitarists uses a lot of phase and flange - think Cocteau Twins - which can sometimes bury my bass, but tonight it's easy to find a balance and sit nicely in the mix. The LM3 is barely at tickover. The load-in and out is a joy - I can lift the Two10 with one hand, and by back is thanking me almost as much as the drunk punter who we played "Happy Birthday" to. All in all, a very good night. First Rehearsal (Loud Band) The following night is rehearsal night with my loud punk/rock covers band. Two deaf overdriven guitarists playing through 4 x 12 Marshall half-stacks and a shed-building drummer who thinks that John Bonham played like a wuss. We're really loud, especially in a small rehearsal room, and I'm glad of the 18dB of volume-reduction from my Alpine earplugs. I'm running an SVT amp-sim through the Markbass to give me a bit of "Grrr", which sounds great through the Two10. With this band, I'm playing a fretted Sterling, for lots of bark and fret-clank. It's a small rehearsal room, and my rig keeps up easily without needing to be pushed. I notice that I've had to wind the master level anticlockwise from its usual setting with the Genz Benz, and cut some of the Lows and Low Mids. First Gig (Loud Band) This is the acid test - my loud band at full gig volume. The venue is a medium sized pub - the room is actually the ground floor of three terraced houses knocked together into one open plan space. I set up as normal, and DI into the PA. The bass drum and both guitars are miked up, and the guitarists are packing a Marshall 4 x 12, and a 2 x 12 respectively. We're fortunate to have an ex-pro soundman who knows how to get a good balanced mix, and manages to keep the volume to a realistic level. He's got a great pair of ears and a wealth of experience, and I trust his judgement. After the soundcheck, he beckons to me, and I walk over to the desk. He points down, and I notice to my amazement that the fader for my bass is at zero - my new little rig with its tiny Two10 cab is doing 100% of the work, with no reinforcement from the PA at all! Verdict My Two10 doesn't just keep up with the "ordinary" 4 x 10 it replaces, its louder. It's not just about volume though - the tone is great, and the sound fills the room better than my old cab. I originally thought that I'd end up getting a pair of Two10s, but that would be absolute overkill for my situation, even for my noisy covers band. At first I was skeptical of Barefaced's claim that the Two10 could replace a 4 x 10, but in my experience, that's absolutely the case.
  18. Time is a great filter. It strains out all of the crap, so that we only remember the good stuff. Actually, thinking about it, it strains out all of the bland, "meh" stuff, leaving us to remember the good stuff, plus the outstandingly bad - Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep anyone? That said, there was a queue at my local old-git barbers last week, so I ended up sitting in the trendy yoof establishment next door, listening to Radio 1. I was amazed at just how anodyne all of the songs were. Whilst I was in the shop, every song they played sounded exactly the same - some guy mumble-rapping something about how down he was that his "GF" wouldn't give him a "BJ", over a dull backing track consisting entirely of generic Garage Band marimba samples. By the end, I was so worn down by the suffocating, emotionless blandness of it all, that I wasn't even annoyed when it was time to pay and the hairdresser called me "Babes".
  19. I had a very positive experience with them - I returned an acoustic that had been bought as a Christmas present for my daughter by her grandmother, as I thought the soundboard bracing was buzzing. They accepted the return without question, (I'm not even sure that we had the receipt) and sorted the problem within a week - the buzzing turned out to be a loose battery box. Excellent customer service, and a pleasure to deal with, even though I hadn't made the original purchase.
  20. #5 The two steps to being a sought-after musician: Play well. Play nice. (even more crucial than 1 in a small pool of people).
  21. I discovered recently that the Number One record in the UK charts on the day that I was born was "Double Barrel" by Dave and Ansell Collins. I like to think that this subliminally inspired my later love of dub and reggae, and my musical career as a low-note specialist.
  22. This^^^ 😜 I was at college in 1991 and still considered myself a g****rist. Then a funk band with two gorgeous female singers came along. The guitar chair was filled, but they needed a bass player. I had a bass, but no bass amp, so played through my 100W Laney Linebacker guitar combo, so I must've sounded awful. I was blagging it terribly, but the rest of the band were a talented lot, and we were well received wherever we played. Though I failed to seduce either singer, I was myself seduced by the ways of the low note. People started calling me 'Dave Bass', and it stuck. (On reflection, I do actually remember a successful liasion with our backing dancer, so perhaps the low-notes did the trick in the end - My playing hasn't inspired anyone else to take their clothes off since, mind.) 😕
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