Jump to content
musicbassman

Five musicians, one scale

Recommended Posts

Adam Neely is joined by four other incredibly talented musicians who each rise to the challenge of making great sounding music using the scale from Hell.....

Most enjoyable. Who's your favourite?

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First one was good as well I thought but a really interesting exercise. Some people are so good.

Edited by scalpy
Spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not much of a music theorist. All the ‘scale talk’ gave me a much queasier feeling than the actual scale was purported to give!

Apart from the last one (which was too much of a jazz noodle for me) they all sounded good........ I just don’t get why they shouldn’t?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Nail Soup said:

I’m not much of a music theorist. All the ‘scale talk’ gave me a much queasier feeling than the actual scale was purported to give!

Apart from the last one (which was too much of a jazz noodle for me) they all sounded good........ I just don’t get why they shouldn’t?

It's the relationship between the tonic, the home note, and the fifth, called the dominant. In the other six modes based on the major scale this is always a perfect fifth, sometimes known as a power chord. This interval is very strong, is very closely related to the harmonic series and importantly is stable, it doesn't want to resolve. 

The locrian mode has a diminished fifth, one semitone (or fret- sorry I don't where your theory is up to) smaller. This is discordant to the western ear and wants to either resolve back up by a semitone or move down to a perfect fourth. Therefore the principle chord, chord I in the locrian mode doesn't feel like it's finished. Try playing B D F as a chord and see what I mean. This is sometimes known as tritone- you can wiki that all day long! 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, scalpy said:

It's the relationship between the tonic, the home note, and the fifth, called the dominant. In the other six modes based on the major scale this is always a perfect fifth, sometimes known as a power chord. This interval is very strong, is very closely related to the harmonic series and importantly is stable, it doesn't want to resolve. 

The locrian mode has a diminished fifth, one semitone (or fret- sorry I don't where your theory is up to) smaller. This is discordant to the western ear and wants to either resolve back up by a semitone or move down to a perfect fourth. Therefore the principle chord, chord I in the locrian mode doesn't feel like it's finished. Try playing B D F as a chord and see what I mean. This is sometimes known as tritone- you can wiki that all day long! 

Oh, the devils chord! I did know that one already, but my music theory does not stretch much further.

Maybe I'll google the locrian scale later and try it out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...