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I bought the Superlux HD681B back in November after seeing the recommendation in this thread.  I wasn't sure whether to go for HD681 or HD681B; I went for HD681B in the end.  They were £25 and I use them daily now for practising at home.  Really happy with them.  Thanks @timhiggins

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On 30/12/2019 at 11:11, jrixn1 said:

I bought the Superlux HD681B back in November after seeing the recommendation in this thread.  I wasn't sure whether to go for HD681 or HD681B; I went for HD681B in the end.  They were £25 and I use them daily now for practising at home.  Really happy with them.  Thanks @timhiggins

My pleasure and i'm glad your'e happy with them 

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So I went on a bit of a mission with this headphones thing - as Christmas was coming up I asked for the Edifer HD850 for a present. 
My mother in law ordered off eBay but when I unwrapped them the plastic joint that connects the headphones to the head band had sheared off in transit. :( 
Money was refunded and given to me to sort myself out... (though the seller didn't want the broken phones back so they are still at my in-laws, I might try and superglue for something that kinda works but won't move much) 

So next on the list were the Superlux HD681, probably in the HD681F model that are a bit flatter. I'll be using them to set up HX stomp patches so close to flat as possible is useful. £20 in Thomann, but while I was there started looking at the AKG K240 studio that the Superlux seem to be influenced by and reading up on reviews ands the like and on the difference.

A chance eBay search found a pair of old school AKG K240-DF headphones... slightly misslabled in the auction and finishing at an odd time, so I managed to win that auction for a tiny bit more than the Superlux are. I'll have to work out the whole 600ohm thing but should be interesting. (and if it doesn't work out I can always sell them for similar and buy the Superlux) 

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Posted (edited)
On 28/10/2019 at 06:50, NJE said:

A very good friend of mine works in music production/writing/session work etc and he and a lot of friends/colleagues swear by the Sennheiser HD25’s. Apparently they have a very flat natural response and sound fantastic.

I too have the Sennheiser HD25s – they aren't flat response by any means – they have pronounced bass. I also use Sennheiser HD650s which are as flat as a flat thing and are widely used for reference – I use both straight from the output jack on the bass via John East pre-amps – the 650s are louder than the HD25s. Hope this helps.

Edited by Fishman

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The best "recommended headphones list" I've ever seen, and have trusted for many years, is this one: https://www.innerfidelity.com/content/innerfidelitys-wall-fame-over-ear-open

It has recommendations for all price ranges and applications, and the list is put together by one of the most authoritative and trusted headphone professional in the world. I've followed his career and advice since the early aughts.

For myself, I'm one of those "head-fiers" who have bought, sold, traded, and auditioned many headphones over the last couple of decades. My currently headphones are:

Audeze LCD-2 - For critical listening (music production) and leisurely listening in my studio.

Aeon Flow Open - I just recently got this to replace the LCD-2, and only because the LCD-2 is a little heavy for me. Tonally the LCD-2 is more accurate and punchy, but with my custom EQ correctly the Aeon Flow Open can sound very similar, and it's far more comfortable to wear.

Sennheiser HD650 - For leisurely listening and practicing bass in my bedroom. 

Audio-Technica M50 - For traveling or closed-back listening. I have no used for closed-back critical listening currently, but if I did, I'd upgrade this to something a bit more high-end.

Klipsch X6i - For traveling, when I need the convenience of in-ear instead of full-sized headphones.

Hifiman RE400 - For when I need in-ear while in bed at night.

When I use headphones, I ALWAYS apply custom EQ to correct each model to sound as neutral and accurate as possible, whenever possible. (I use sine wave test tones and selected testing music to even out the frequency response.) 

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2 hours ago, Lunatique said:

The best "recommended headphones list" I've ever seen, and have trusted for many years, is this one: https://www.innerfidelity.com/content/innerfidelitys-wall-fame-over-ear-open

It has recommendations for all price ranges and applications, and the list is put together by one of the most authoritative and trusted headphone professional in the world. I've followed his career and advice since the early aughts.

For myself, I'm one of those "head-fiers" who have bought, sold, traded, and auditioned many headphones over the last couple of decades. My currently headphones are:

Audeze LCD-2 - For critical listening (music production) and leisurely listening in my studio.

Aeon Flow Open - I just recently got this to replace the LCD-2, and only because the LCD-2 is a little heavy for me. Tonally the LCD-2 is more accurate and punchy, but with my custom EQ correctly the Aeon Flow Open can sound very similar, and it's far more comfortable to wear.

Sennheiser HD650 - For leisurely listening and practicing bass in my bedroom. 

Audio-Technica M50 - For traveling or closed-back listening. I have no used for closed-back critical listening currently, but if I did, I'd upgrade this to something a bit more high-end.

Klipsch X6i - For traveling, when I need the convenience of in-ear instead of full-sized headphones.

Hifiman RE400 - For when I need in-ear while in bed at night.

When I use headphones, I ALWAYS apply custom EQ to correct each model to sound as neutral and accurate as possible, whenever possible. (I use sine wave test tones and selected testing music to even out the frequency response.) 

In my hunt I found that there seemed to be high end professional headphones (studio/radio etc) ... and then the much more expensive prosumer market. And some of them favoured in both. Kinda like the good precision bass or the Ritter for recording your next record.

Obv different reasons people are buying them 

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I bought a set of Sennheiser HD201''s a number of years ago after BC members recommended them.. I still use them to rehearse at home. They're great. Long lead, lightweight, handle bass well. I've used them in a home full  band rehearsal setting when using electric kits etc. Even used them live. I'm sure there's 1000's of models suitable out there that would fit the bill but these cost £17 from Asda. I think they might be cheaper online now.  

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I received my Superlux HD681 earlier in the week. Would not have known about them without Basschat so thanks folks. 

First thing I noticed was that I didn't notice anything. No impulse to reach for the eq, no thought of how deep or bright the bass sounded. 

It just sounds like my bass. 

I think they're great. Really happy and at 18 quid (I bought a Harley Benton bass as well so I could get free postage) they were a steal. 

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Quite many people have given their recommendations, but not very objective ones.

Basics: the ear canal grows through life. It changes somewhat during a 5 year timeline. (This also means that molded ear plugs should be updated every now and then.)

Ear in total is different with every person. You might say, that everybody hears things in a slightly different way. This is the reason why all hearing parameters are statistically analyzed and are a bunch of averaged numbers.

OK, so the size of the ear may differ a lot. How well certain model fits an individual should be tested. How well certain model sounds to an individual should be tested, too.

There is no single, or universal solution for you. This is why I suggest to test at least few units side by side. Volume has to be compensated.

Testing only one pair without a reference is simply silly. Ear tends to accommodate to the media, and after a pretty short time the new pair of headphones is "the best I ever had". This simply sounds like BS.

I used to work in a broadcasting company where soundengineers did yearly tests on equipment. The results were surprising every now and then, as the "standards" were challenged. The good thing was, that the test group was pretty big, and they published the results to those interested. A single guy in a single studio is not able to do comparisons like those. In reality the budget is the first limitation with any small studio.

Test and compare, and you will be satisfied with a suitable product to your specific needs. Yes, I understand that a place with tens of pairs of headphones (studio monitors, microphone, you name it) is not always possible. Still I have to emphasize the importance of comparison. Believe what you hear.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, itu said:

Quite many people have given their recommendations, but not very objective ones.

Basics: the ear canal grows through life. It changes somewhat during a 5 year timeline. (This also means that molded ear plugs should be updated every now and then.)

Ear in total is different with every person. You might say, that everybody hears things in a slightly different way. This is the reason why all hearing parameters are statistically analyzed and are a bunch of averaged numbers.

OK, so the size of the ear may differ a lot. How well certain model fits an individual should be tested. How well certain model sounds to an individual should be tested, too.

There is no single, or universal solution for you. This is why I suggest to test at least few units side by side. Volume has to be compensated.

Testing only one pair without a reference is simply silly. Ear tends to accommodate to the media, and after a pretty short time the new pair of headphones is "the best I ever had". This simply sounds like BS.

I used to work in a broadcasting company where soundengineers did yearly tests on equipment. The results were surprising every now and then, as the "standards" were challenged. The good thing was, that the test group was pretty big, and they published the results to those interested. A single guy in a single studio is not able to do comparisons like those. In reality the budget is the first limitation with any small studio.

Test and compare, and you will be satisfied with a suitable product to your specific needs. Yes, I understand that a place with tens of pairs of headphones (studio monitors, microphone, you name it) is not always possible. Still I have to emphasize the importance of comparison. Believe what you hear.

This is why communities like head-fi.org are so valuable. Many of its members own large collections of notable headphones and do meticulous tests with them, measuring frequency response with expensive dedicated gear, do comparison tests, perform double-blind tests, EQ'ing headphones, buying/selling different models, etc. 

To compensate for individual physiological differences, EQ'ing headphones to achieve a neutral frequency response (using sine wave test tones, log sweeps, pink noise, familiar musical material etc.) is the best/only way. But of course, the corrected response will be tailored to the person's physiology, but that person will hear the most accurate frequency response and thus will be able to make critical mixing/mastering decisions from the position of neutrality. Once the finished mastering goes out to the general public, each person will have their own audio gear (which will generally be colored) and their own idiosyncratic physiology, and there's nothing you can do about it as the person who created the recording, so it's up to each of those people to strive for neutral accuracy in their own playback system.

For those interested, I have written an in-depth tutorial on how to surgically EQ your headphones (or audio gear in general) to achieve a neutral and accurate frequency response for your own physiology: https://www.head-fi.org/threads/the-most-reliable-easiest-way-to-eq-headphones-properly-to-achieve-the-most-ideal-sound-for-non-professionals.796791/

For those using speakers, you can just get room/speaker correction products. I use IK Multimedia's ARC System 2 in my studio and it's one of the best products of its type on the market. 

For bass amps, since I only practice and record sitting in the same spot, I just use a graphic EQ (RANE ME30B) to correct the room mode at the position to get the most accurate frequency response. I can't stress how important this is if you care about hearing your bass's natural tone accurately without the coloration of the room mode (or if your amp has its own inherent coloration that you prefer not to hear). But again, this is only catering to you, in that exact spot. I only play for myself and do recordings at home, so I don't have to worry about gigging and whether the audience is getting the most neutral frequency response or if the live mix guy is doing a good job.

Edited by Lunatique
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1 hour ago, Lunatique said:

This is why communities like head-fi.org are so valuable. Many of its members own large collections of notable headphones and do meticulous tests with them...

Both of your comments have interesting details, that I point out:

- different headphones (microphones, speakers...) for different situations

- many members of head-fi... sorry, I still rely on my ears

The first is important, as different tasks require different equipment. Those professional soundengineers told me that Genelec is an excellent monitor for studio, but they would not use them at home. Yes, it was a rough comment, but it opened my eyes to understand the difference of tools. HiFi is one thing, studio another.

There are lots of people making analysis on different stuff. As long as we discuss about basses and studio work, I am a bit careful mixing HiFi in. Yes, my equipment is HiFi, because I do not have a studio. But I would certainly check the offerings if I was sitting there.

My idea here is that there is a point, where we need to change our listening habits according to the place, material, and surroundings. Then only our own ears can help us to hear the stuff that is important.

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And one more point, to be clear: I like and value high your way of using different headphones to get the best out of them, dear @Lunatique

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21 minutes ago, itu said:

Both of your comments have interesting details, that I point out:

- different headphones (microphones, speakers...) for different situations

- many members of head-fi... sorry, I still rely on my ears

The first is important, as different tasks require different equipment. Those professional soundengineers told me that Genelec is an excellent monitor for studio, but they would not use them at home. Yes, it was a rough comment, but it opened my eyes to understand the difference of tools. HiFi is one thing, studio another.

There are lots of people making analysis on different stuff. As long as we discuss about basses and studio work, I am a bit careful mixing HiFi in. Yes, my equipment is HiFi, because I do not have a studio. But I would certainly check the offerings if I was sitting there.

My idea here is that there is a point, where we need to change our listening habits according to the place, material, and surroundings. Then only our own ears can help us to hear the stuff that is important.

It’s similar to how you’ll have much debate about “is bass a better than bass b” and precious little chat about what people are using them for!

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I use a set Grado Prestige SR80e's

Grado make a range of open back headphones that are simply awesome. They never distort or feel overworked under studio conditions

Well worth a look depending on your budget

 

https://www.grado.co.uk/

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32 minutes ago, ZenBasses said:

I use a set Grado Prestige SR80e's

Grado make a range of open back headphones that are simply awesome. They never distort or feel overworked under studio conditions

Well worth a look depending on your budget

 

https://www.grado.co.uk/

Another vote here for Grado headphones; awesome is indeed the correct term.

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