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Input socket I.D.


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Just now, fleabag said:

It looks pretty similar  Bart. 

Its a dual pole,  4 leg,  and switched  ( whatever that means )  but i cannot see the spec on the distance between solder legs.  1 mm out would mean it wouldnt fit, presumably

17.05mm along the length

16.23mm widthwise

1049767380_Screenshot2021-06-09at17_15_13.thumb.png.989a5746ecc6b05a2f75b8b15689c536.png

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Posted (edited)

"Switched" means that when you push a jack into the socket, it will break the connection between the legs, i.e. switching something off.

In otherwords, two pairs of the 4 pins will be connected together until the jack is pushed in and forces them apart - the jack points will then connect to 2 of the legs on one side.

They are used in patchbays/inserts a lot. -The signal from a fixed source is constantly connected to the output until you push a jack in and then that is connected to the output instead.

I'm afraid I don't know Markbass stuff enough to know if it uses these for a particular circuit or if they just use it as a standard jack socket and the non plugged route is redundant.

 

 

Edited by Huge Hands
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Just now, Huge Hands said:

"Switched" means that when you push a jack into the socket, it will break the connection between the legs, i.e. switching something off.

In otherwords, two pairs of the 4 pins will be connected together until the jack is pushed in and forces them apart - the jack points will then connect to 2 of the legs on one side.

They are used in patchbays/inserts a lot. -The signal from a fixed source is constantly connected to the output until you push a jack in and then that is connected to the output instead.

I'm afraid I don't know Markbass stuff enough to know if it uses these for a particular circuit or if they just use it as a standard jack socket and the non plgged route is redundant.

 

 

Thanks HH.

I dont know either, regarding what MB use.  I did a search for MB spares before posting here and there's just about bugger all

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6 minutes ago, fleabag said:

Thanks HH.

I dont know either, regarding what MB use.  I did a search for MB spares before posting here and there's just about bugger all

MB don't market spares. They send you to Real electronics who will diagnose the fault and then swap the offending PCB. They don't seem to work at component level and their charges are pretty hefty.

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13 minutes ago, fleabag said:

I'll have to make it fit  :)

 

If you're ok with a soldering iron and there's room, you could solder short fly leads on to your replacement and then solder those leads to the board, then the socket would be free to be a different size - as long as the nut around the socket held it in place against the front panel.....

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I had to replace the headphone socket on my amp as the breaking connectors had lost their spring and were lifting by themselves, randomly muting the amp.  Took a while to diagnose that one :)  Replaced it myself, it was pretty easy.  I see you've already done the most annoying part - removing the old socket, so it should be a breeze as long as you're replacing like for like.

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the dimensions for that kind of socket are usually given for the holes in the pcb, from the photo you have posted it looks like the measurements you gave might be backwards?  it looks wider than it is long.

another measurement to check is from the end of the threaded part to the first set of pins, this needs to be right so that the board goes back in the chassis correctly.

 

Matt

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Indeed Matt, it was the holes i measured.    But if i gave backwards measurements ( quoted below ) and we swapped 'em round,  the first socket posted by Bartelby by still wouldn't fit , but on the one i ordered, there doesnt seem to be a measurment  for the pins.  It just looks right and if it doesnt fit. i'll start again.   I reckon Markbass, being a rather large company, can afford to have the components made as a one off so you have to have an official repair done

Dammit - just whipped out yon digital calipers.

15.85 mm  length

12.35 mm width

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On 09/06/2021 at 17:43, Huge Hands said:

"

They are used in patchbays/inserts a lot. -The signal from a fixed source is constantly connected to the output until you push a jack in and then that is connected to the output instead.

I'm afraid I don't know Markbass stuff enough to know if it uses these for a particular circuit or if they just use it as a standard jack socket and the non plugged route is redundant.

 

 

Yes - used for "normalling" in patchbays - ie the 'normal' signal route exists with no plug inserted and the signal routing is modified when you plug in to put another piece of kit in the chain. And in headphone / speaker automatic switching etc.

On an amplifier input the switched contacts are 'normally' connected to 0V so that the amp is quiet when no cable plugged in.

Otherwise the high impedance of the input would pick up noise. Plugging a cable in replaces 0V with the signal from the guitar.

The contact nearest the front of the socket would usually connect to 0V anyway so the switching on that contact may have no effect (although the designer might do something not straightforward with the 0V / Screen connection) but those sockets are mass produced like that.

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