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Mickeyboro

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  1. Shaddap! You were wearing a kilt when I met you, Keith😂
  2. So you’re a rocker at heart, Denny. The Thunderbird low-slung image works for you. But you’re right, the JC is probably easier to fit into multiple genres - especially if, like me, you tend towards rootsier stuff as the years go by. That said, I have seen the Thunderbird played by a country bassist. It looked daft but sounded fine. So how much do looks and image matter to you? And how broad-minded are Austin bands and audiences? Would be a shame to lose a potential gig cos you look like the guy from MotleyCrue!😬
  3. What kind of music are you playing? Talkbass doesn’t encourage detail, but we do! The more info the better. And why Epiphone, specifically?
  4. Welcome - apologies for the tardis response....
  5. Lovely, have one of these myself! GLWTS...
  6. The Kaye has an e, the Carol doesn’t! 😆
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 1 post to view.
  8. These two books have proved entertaining and informative lockdown reading for me, a US music fanatic. It’s now someone else’s turn to enjoy them at a substantial discount - combined published price is well over £30. Becoming Elektra by Mick Houghton tells the incredible true story of the pioneering Elektra Records label and its far-sighted founder, Jac Holzman, who built a small folk imprint into a home for some of the most groundbreaking, important, and enduring music of the rock era. Placing the Elektra label in a broader context, the book presents a gripping narrative of musical and cultural history that reads like an inventory of all that is exciting and innovative about the 60s and 70s: The Doors, Love s Forever Changes, Tim Buckley s Goodbye and Hello, The Stooges, The MC5 s Kick Out The Jams, Queen and Queen II, The Incredible String Band, Carly Simon s No Secrets, and many, many more. First published in 2010, Becoming Elektra was praised as 'eye-opening (Q) and a 'dazzling narrative (The Sun), and for 'perfectly encapsulating the enigmatic, unpredictable spirit of the label (Record Collector). This fully revised and expanded edition includes a brand new foreword by John Densmore of The Doors and draws on extensive new interviews with a wide range of Elektra alumni, including Tom Paley, Judy Henske, Johnny Echols, Jean Ritchie, and Bernie Krause, as well as further conversations with Holzman himself. It also adds two new chapters: a look at Elektra in Britain in the 60s and a reappraisal of the label s 70s output. Bread: A Sweet Surrender: The Musical Journey of David Gates, James Griffin & Co. Author:-Searles, Malcolm C Format:-Paperback / softback Publisher:-Post Hill Press Publisher Date:-24/09/2019 Pages:-320 Genre:-Biography, Composers & Musicians, Music Amazingly detailed biography of an underrated band, with fascinating description of the shifting dynamics as they found success on the Elektra label. Features exclusive interviews with musicians and associates.
  9. A bathroom with a lieu, apparently 😆
  10. Just watched 10 mins of this before deleting. Annoying mix of (mostly) still photos, familiar music and British talking heads pontificating unconvincingly about an American band. Cheap TV! At least I don’t pay for it...😷
  11. Was a bit shocked at his explanation that Free split because ‘Andy wanted to go commercial, I wanted to go back to the Blues and Koss didn’t back me up...’
  12. Will be watching, but on the strength of one Johnson programme (Joe Walsh) won't be expecting too much. I was a mega Free fan, but missed them live - did see Bad Co's London debut (second ever gig) but it didn't compare. The great thing about Free was that every band member thought they were the main man. Hence the constant edginess. Once Rodgers was installed as undisputed BC boss, he was never pushed to the same heights. Fabulous voice, but so often the albums felt he was operating within himself. Johnson should empathise with him as a vocalist, but his ride round LA in a limo with Walsh felt like cheap TV and could have been so much more... Let's see!
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