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51m0n

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51m0n last won the day on December 14 2017

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About 51m0n

  • Birthday 26/05/1970

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  1. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Yep, its absolutely fascinating - literally all the research papers dating back to the 30's on studio design, absorption and diffusion, partition wall design, acoustics in various studios. I mean this is the absolute real deal, proper science and actual investment in trying multiple possible solutions to many problems faced in studio design. It is a time consuming read, but I can't recommend it enough. I've read most of it that pertains to studio design/acoustic treatment that was written in the last 50 years and its truly excellent material.
  2. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    If thete is one organisation you can trust to give you access to decades of their research ibto acoustic designs in studios its the BBC:- http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/search?query=Acoustic&submit= Enjoy!!!
  3. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    That's it mate - you're soooo screwed
  4. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Yep all sounds great, but the problem with subs is time alignment with your mains around the crossover point. The whole idea that a sub can go more or less anywhere and sound great is misleading at best, it must also be the same distance from both mains (or they will skew, you will get comb filtering and other weirdness etc etc), and any wall reflections need to be taken into consideration. Eventually you find there may be nowhere where your sub doesn't do something funny to the sound in the area where you mains produce something (not enough) and the sub top end. It can be done, but it is very difficult to do (very very very difficult) even with software, and IME you're better off getting full range speakers to do the job and just take all that guess work out of it
  5. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Well probably not. Your ears dont really do sub 40Hz very well, Fletcher-Munsen curves and all that. So given we struggle to hear that low anyway, if your mains are attenuating that low by a further 6 to 9dB (not unusual) then you have pretty much no chance of telling if there is anything there at all. Now in a mix situation this is not such a huge deal. But when you are mastering it really does. Anywhere you can get rid of garbage you should. Not only is it wasted energy but its wasted bits and that equates to less apparent level. Now I am by no means an advocate for the loudness wars thing but if it taught mastering engineers anything it was stow all that rubbish. So you say, big deal, hi-pass filter sorted. Yeah but sometimes what is down there is real weight thats good, in the bass maybe, and losing that makes the mix weak, but the kick is just phat tubby lard as well so now you need to set up a multiband compressor limiter situation to deal with this. And that is when you'll be all kinds of happy that your monitors can give you some definition and decent clues that deep....
  6. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Well you want to be able to hear the bad stuff that might be going on down there. People tend to forget that 20 to 40Hz is an entire octave (like 10KHz to 20KHz is only one octave). If your monitors can't do that then who knows what rubbish low end energy you might be chucking out!
  7. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    that way madness lies, I warn you
  8. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    I hate subs. They are nightmarish to get right. If they arent right or you get a skewed mix you are always left thinking "Is it the sub set up?". Give ne some mahoosive monitors every time 😆
  9. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Heh! My mains are floorstanding transmission lines, they are indeed immense and also very very old, but I know them ridiculously well, and as a reference for deep bass, and I mean close to 20Hz if you need it, as well as for reverb and other spacial fx levels they are fantastic for me. One day I will upgrade them, I love transmission lines though and I have always wanted a set of PMCs but the 40k+ price is a bit of an issue I tend to use a variety of tools when mixing and mastering, headphones are superb for setting up transients and compression, anything where real detailed listeing is required, the big mains are superb for balancing bass/mids and the aforementioned spacial fx, I like to use TV/ mobile phone/laptop speakers for checking and mid/top attack settings and that mixes/masters collapse to worst case scenario playback, and the car is great to make sure I've not over done the booooom Its slow and time consuming to reference on this many systems, but its how I've worked for years, and the result tends to be mixes that translate across pretty much everything.
  10. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Now that is fascinating... My main speakers are over 14" deep. They are therefore placed about as close to the wall as I can get them, about 3" away. Never really noticed a big dip in the bass, this probably has helped 😆 Worse than that dip in many situations was the problem of putting your mains on the back edge of your mixing desk. The reflections off the desk would comb filter with the direct sound to your ear blowing not just frequency response but stereo image as well!
  11. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Particular issues lie wherever you have two dimensions or more as multiples of each other, ohhhhh boy inherent unsolvable badness incoming! I've built non parallel internal rooms to get out of this whole before now for serious studio builds, yes its massive ballache, but you can't beat it in the end.....
  12. 51m0n

    DIY Acoustic Panels

    Generally speaking the best bang for the buck and bang for the volume required of bass trapping is achieved with a corner design absorber known as a 'superchunk'. A good example for how to build Superchunks is here:- http://forum.studiotips.com/viewtopic.php?t=535 Whenever dealing with bass absorption the place to put your absorption material for maximum efficacy is where walls meet ( you can check this out by playing some good bassy music in your room and walking up to the corner where two walls meet, you get a significant boost in bass, soaking this up here gives you more bang for the buck). This is even more apparent where three walls meet. However this also applies where floors meet walls and walls meet ceilings, effectively it is possible to super chunk every internal edge inside the room, giving a maximum of 12 places to put bass traps for absolutely maximum efficiency! For more general absorption the most important place to put it is where the sound from your speakers is bouncing off the wall and then coming back to your ears in your central listening position. You can find this with the help of a mirror and a friend. You sit in the listening position, they move the mirror along the wall, when you see you speaker in the mirror, thats where the absorption panel goes, same for the neares and furthest speakers, in many cases an absorber can cover both speakers at once on a wall. After that A good idea is the wall behind the speakers for a couple of panels, again you can use a mirror to locate the best places for this absorption. Points to note, too much absorption is not great, the room will go 'dead', at this point you need to consider adding diffusion or a sheet of foil or plastic over the front face of the absorber behind the fabric and in front of the rockwool (or equivalent), or to use plywood with strips cut out of it to cause diffraction/reflection over 500Hz. Obviously the precise nature of the pattern cut into the board has a massive affect, plenty of examples on gearslutz in their acoustics forum. You often see diffusers placed on the wall behind the listeing area (the 'backwall' of the room). There are extremely specific designs required for diffusers, they generally only work for higher frequencies, and take up a lot of space if you want to get deeper frequencies affected (up to 6ft deep is possible for a diffuser wall, the diffuser room at Nashville's Blackbird Studios being the best example of this I know of:- https://www.blackbirdstudio.com/studio-c Note George Massenburg, who designed this room, is a genius, he invented parameteric eqs!) This will breath life into the room, massively improving it as a space for mixing and tracking and mastering. Panel absorption across a corner is way better than nothing, but it isnt as good as a well built superchunk. Panel positions within the room are very important to get the best of them.
  13. 51m0n

    Mastering software/plugins

    So a chain with some or all of these will see you right 95% of the time:- Multiband compressor with up to 5 bands, if you really know how to use it 3 band very broad eq for some gentle eq 'Surgical' hiQ eq if there are any nasty frequencies to get rid of Mid side compressor for widening and control of the stereo field Multiband saturation Feedback comp for gentle level control across sections Decent brickwall limiter is a must Check in mono too...
  14. 51m0n

    Recording on your own

    Just one last look, I promise (those walls!):- https://www.gearslutz.com/board/photo-diaries-of-recording-studio-construction-projects/161575-manifold-recording-studio-construction-thread.html
  15. 51m0n

    Recording on your own

    Yes. I have spent the better part of 30 years learning sound engineering. Still learn new stuff every mix/recording session/mastering session. Its been brilliant, I was lucky enough to be mentored by some superb engineers/producers and experience some name bands with actual budgets working in 'real' studios. Beats the hell out of youtube videos when you are immersed in it 24/7 even for a few weeks. You never seem to forget stuff from those experiences. Its been challenging (deadline to complete soldering the 32 channel fully balanced desk for the new B Studio we needed to be ready within a couple of weeks was'optimistic' at best). A certain guitarist's attitude was rather trying at times. My ears could only last so long back then because I didn't know how to listen as well, that was hard to understand. I know I have forgotten more about mic placement than I think most modern chaps learn in college and the next few years of their careers. My ears a pretty good, they could be better, but they are better than most. The kit never guarantees a recording, learn the theory and practice of sound engineering as much as you need to to get the results you are hoping for. It not worth learning more unless you are serious about a career in it. A lack of skills will prevent a reasonable recording more than anything else. Budget gear these days is insanely good for the money, not as good as the big boys toys, but still, unbelievable really. Having said that, with decent mics/board and just 2 tracks I can record a live take better than most people can mix umpty and three tracks; if the band are on it and the room is good. HAVE FUN! Don't beat yourself up, your efforts are going to be woeful for far longer than you stay with GB if the bug bites. Keep learning, go and look at the Gearslutz website (the beginner and budget areas are where your interests should take you, forget the big boys toys, they are useless to you).
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