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PJ-Bassist

First Jazz Jam - What an experience!!

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30 minutes ago, deepbass5 said:

and listening to jazz standards which i do not. 

This is something I need to start doing.  Although my listening is now almost exclusively Jazz, none of it is standards and it doesn't feature much in the way of walking bass lines.

For those reading / following this thread, please do provide me with some recommended listening!

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1 hour ago, PJ-Bassist said:

For those reading / following this thread, please do provide me with some recommended listening!

Some of the best recordings I can think of are the Miles Davis ones from the late 50s, Cookin', Relaxin', Steamin' and Workin' (you can get them all on one compilation called "The Prestige Sessions" I think). They were all recorded at the same couple of sessions and they're mostly standards with the incomparable Paul Chambers on bass. For learning walking bass I'd say they're better than Kind Of Blue because the tunes are more typical of what you'll play at a jazz jam. Somethin' Else by Cannonball Adderly is also a lovely album with the definitive version of Autumn Leaves.

There are hundreds more but these are great to start with.

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18 hours ago, PJ-Bassist said:

Let me know any tips and tricks you've learnt along the way.

I grew up on Tin Pan Alley, so the standards are ingrained in my soul. I 'know' every likely number that is called, but my bass/music skills (lack of talent) are such that I can't just jam along without the chords. The 'feel' is not something I struggle with though, having listened to that stuff all my life and also having played sax in various jazz outfits. Since I'm not playing jazz sax in a band at the moment, I do noodle to the Hal Leonard jazz series stuff. I've got a small stack of those books and I love the bands that are on the recordings. They play in the most supportive way, obviously. The great advantage is that the books cover all the instruments, including bass, and the recordings are with or without top line or keyboard and bass. This way, I can listen to the basslines which are laid down really elegantly but in a no-nonsense way by the professional guys on the recordings. You don't have to buy the books - there's plenty similar on YouTube. One of the things I do is look for saxophone versions of standards like these on jazzbacks and then I add my own bass.

 

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On 28/02/2020 at 18:46, stewblack said:

Inspired by this thread I just learned a neat run based on the minor pentatonic scale and spent a happy hour jamming over some jazzy backing tracks - not a thing I ever saw myself doing.

I learned the run down from this video and jammed variations of it over this one.

Stranglers fans will no doubt notice similarities with the run and a certain classic.

LOL I was just starting to cook when I got a Dyson ad. It sucks!

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1 hour ago, Stub Mandrel said:

LOL I was just starting to cook when I got a Dyson ad. It sucks!

ADBLOCK! 😅😅😅

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I sometimes worry such music places an intellectual exercise above musicality.*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Which really means some of those chords are outside my comfort zone...

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On ‎29‎/‎02‎/‎2020 at 13:01, julietgreen said:

I grew up on Tin Pan Alley, so the standards are ingrained in my soul. I 'know' every likely number that is called, but my bass/music skills (lack of talent) are such that I can't just jam along without the chords. The 'feel' is not something I struggle with though, having listened to that stuff all my life and also having played sax in various jazz outfits. Since I'm not playing jazz sax in a band at the moment, I do noodle to the Hal Leonard jazz series stuff. I've got a small stack of those books and I love the bands that are on the recordings. They play in the most supportive way, obviously. The great advantage is that the books cover all the instruments, including bass, and the recordings are with or without top line or keyboard and bass. This way, I can listen to the basslines which are laid down really elegantly but in a no-nonsense way by the professional guys on the recordings. You don't have to buy the books - there's plenty similar on YouTube. One of the things I do is look for saxophone versions of standards like these on jazzbacks and then I add my own bass.

 

Nice playing - I'm hearing Lester Young in there, maybe some Stan Getz?

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22 minutes ago, mangotango said:

Nice playing - I'm hearing Lester Young in there, maybe some Stan Getz?

Very nice. Not me, I hasten to add. The player demonstrates various vintage horns. Lovely sounds.

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