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Stingray5

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About Stingray5

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    Solitary Witness
  • Birthday November 13

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    Essex/London borders

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  1. Thanks for the reply re: Sam Li. Can you recall where he did the refinish? Was it Gerrard Street or elsewhere? Thanks

    1. Stingray5

      Stingray5

      To be honest, I'm not sure where he did the actual work on my bass. It was in the early 70's so guess it could have been Gerrard St. Sorry I can't be more certain, I mostly used to see him in Sound City (Shaftesbury Avenue) and dealt with him through the store.

  2. Ah, I didn't know about that one. Maybe someone else has more info?
  3. Quite right! Sam Li worked on a number of Steve Howe's guitars, both electric and acoustic.
  4. Oh my, I'd forgotten about that thread. Thanks, I just read through the whole thing (thankfully just 2 pages! ) @Mark E Re your question about Sam Li, I can't say I knew him all that well but, as I mentioned in the above thread, I used to run into him occasionally in the Sound City/Music City stores on Shaftesbury Avenue where he did a complete re-finish for me on a tobacco sunburst Gibson EB2-D bass. A very nice man, as I recall.
  5. I must admit I hadn't thought to dab in a bit of black acrylic paint over the screw holes. To be fair, it doesn't bother me too much -- it's all part of the 'mojo' - but now you mention it, I may well give it a try.
  6. Yep, I completely understand and, in fact, my Stingray fretless has had the tort guard firmly in place for a long time and will probably remain so. I know this may sound a tad silly to some folks, but in some cases it's almost like playing a new or at least a different instrument and I might even play it a little differently. Yeah, I know, it's all in the mind! Personally, I may just like the idea that removing or replacing a pickguard (where suitable) is a super easy way to give an instrument a different look, albeit probably on a temporary basis.
  7. On the other hand, I quite like going naked sometimes (oo-er missus!) . So, not meaning to change the subject of the topic, but what about the 'no pickguard at all' option? As in my Tokai Jazz Sound: And my fretless 'Ray (as above): And this is one I used to own:
  8. I still think the tort guard on the op's Jazz is the way to go. That said, I do like White Pearl and have swapped out the originals on a few of my instruments as shown below..... Fender USA Jazz (Aquamarine - originallly with plain white pickguard) MM Stingray5 (originallly with plain white pickguard) Fender USA Strat (originally had a plain white guard and all white fittings (controls, pup covers, etc). Yamaha Pacifica 604 (white pearl already installed as standard) I've also installed a white pearl guard to my cream-coloured Fender Telecaster but not taken any pics yet. And finally........ just to show I do also like tort pickguards...... Here's my fretless Stingray
  9. I dunno where you woz taught, but I woz always taught, a guard on a 'burst Jazz has gotta be tort!
  10. Nice to see the old Gibbo here. Brings back some nice memories as I did some recording in France many moons ago and was loaned one of these (with the extra pup) until I could bring my own bass over.
  11. I go along with this, too. I had a Chandler P/J bass back around the mid-80's which played and felt really nice (see pic). Can't think why I got rid of it. Probably to go towards whatever came next! 🙄
  12. Yep, I shall surely have a P one day, Bob! 😎
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