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Andyjr1515

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Andyjr1515 last won the day on July 4

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  1. Going to look good
  2. Andyjr1515

    4 to 5 string conversion Precision Bass

    Good copy if that's the actual one...
  3. Andyjr1515

    4 to 5 string conversion Precision Bass

    Is it a Just-a-nut or a copy?
  4. Andyjr1515

    DTC Basses - Anyone had any experience?

    Looks the real deal to me. Some beautiful builds on the FB page with demos and build vids. Very impressive - and I build basses!
  5. Ooooh - fancy! Very striking. You could also stain it...an ebony board would look pretty classy...
  6. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Although the Festool is now firmly on my wish list (I have seen previous reviews and it is that halfway house that @Christine mentions that seems to be a pretty powerful USP), nevertheless it isn't in my present means so it's old-fashioned BF&I this time round. Got the sanding pretty much done (prob still got the final, final neck work to do) and THE FINISHING IS STARTED Here it is in its sanded form: Not sure if it really comes off, but the figuring just behind the fretboard end always reminded me of the swift shape, so I tried to emulate it with the fretboard end carve: And then the first tru-oil slurry and wipe coats. Unless I have a colour concern, I generally now use that for my base sealing and grain-filling process, whatever the final finish. In this case the final finish is going to be Osmo Polyx satin, but I'll still start with the tru-oil treatment. In a previous build, I proved to myself that you can slurry with Osmo just as well, but I wanted that touch of added amber hue that tru-oil tends to give: The bridge, by the way, is now flush with the leading edge of the body as planned: Finishing progress shots tend to get a bit boring so I won't post the Polyx progress, suffice to say that I will be wiping it on with micro-fibre cloth. All being well, the next shots - probably next week - should be the fully assembled bass It will still need a week or so for the finish to fully harden before I can pass it across to Neil but I think I'm now fully clear of disaster/BBQ wood potential tasks - I think it's actually going to turn into a playable bass! As always, many thanks for the encouraging feedback and pearls of wisdom along the way
  7. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Great endorsement - I'll have a look
  8. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Well - I'm out of excuses now...tomorrow is final sanding day and finishing starts at the weekend. The last job was to set the bridge at its final height, and that allows me to see how much leeway I have for the final curve of the top. It's not critical, but I would like the bridge plate to be at least partially sunken into the top and, ideally, flush. It makes no difference to the functionality, but I want to avoid the look of some bridges where they appear to be a bit of an afterthought. I used a Dremel precision router for the flatness and finished the edges with chisels. Like the pickup routs, I did the curved front corners with a 5mm drill, drilled to final depth, before routing the bulk out : That gives me a nice close fit and looks like it is supposed to be there: This done, it lets me pencil the 'flush level'... ...so I can see how deep to sand. The aim will be flush at the leading edge and curving down a touch to expose the bridge plate progressively towards the tailstock. I'm hoping that the weather stays dry tomorrow as it is a lot easier to do the final sand outside - especially when looking for sanding marks, glue overspill and unwanted dints. The Osmo has arrived so, all being well, I should be able to apply the first couple of sealing coats as well before the start of the weekend
  9. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Yes - a dot of paua:
  10. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    And I remembered another reason when I did the plain topped ones. I thought I'd have a go and found a way of changing the long drill without losing the settings. Glued the three piece sandwich last night and did these this afternoon. The problem is, my cheap diamond pipe cutter generates a lot of heat...and titebond softens with heat. What came out of the pipe cutter were 3 seperate pieces and some soft, molten glue!
  11. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Here are the plain knobs - they will lighten a touch when the oil has dried. @SpondonBassed - please note that I SOMETIMES take notice of what you say ref the background The comparison is here: Personally, I prefer the plainer ones on the actual bass - my eye is drawn to the top and not the knobs - but, whatever, Neil will be given both sets
  12. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    I think I would be rightly accused by @Norris of plagiarism
  13. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Yes - that's my thought. When you add the pattern of the knobs, I wonder if you lose just a smidgen of the bookmatch pattern effect of the body. The plain poplar alternative is the same wood but without the pattern and is identical to the headstock - it may counter that effect and also visually tie the headstock to the body. The nice thing is that I can do both and present Neil with a simple ' do you prefer this or that' and give him the spares anyway By the way, all in, this is 6lbs 6oz at the moment. Less a bit of final finish sanding and plus a bit of finish oiling, that will be pretty much the finished weight.
  14. Andyjr1515

    A build for our own Len_derby

    Slurry and buff certainly - but possibly using the Osmo for the slurry and buffing. I've done that once before and it worked well. It works pretty much the same but there is no possibility of a colour difference between the neck-neck colour and the thru-neck colour.
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