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Andyjr1515

Finished Pics! Swift Lite 2 (sorry, another electric)

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27 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Actually, with the new Ronseal formulation, miniscule streaks is a problem.  It really doesn't self level as it used to and as it ought to and yet it doesn't like being thinned either.  But, as Norris says, microfibre cloths don't shed anything.  

How much do you thin yours down mine must have been about 60 (hardglaze)/40 (Thinners)? 

I’ve thought about giving this a go to see how it comes out....

 

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Rotten double posting software!  I've lost count of the number of ruined replies this new forum has caused me.  If it isn't having to log in repeatedly after reading, it's the double post.

I might just bugger off for a few days.

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59 minutes ago, SpondonBassed said:

Luvly.

Will you leave the cavity interior untreated?

Yes - hence the mouse nest material shoved in there while I was varnishing ;)

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36 minutes ago, Jimothey said:

How much do you thin yours down mine must have been about 60 (hardglaze)/40 (Thinners)? 

I’ve thought about giving this a go to see how it comes out....

 

With the old formulation of Ronseal Hardglaze, I used to do the basic build-up at about 30-40% thinners and then, for the final couple of wetting wipes, around 50%. 

But the new formulation doesn't like that at all.  What happens is that the attraction of itself to itself is stronger than the adhesion to the surface - even a roughed up one.  The wet varnish literally parts itself in random places, leaving deep streaks all the way down to the untreated surface - not usable.

The trouble is, using wipe-on techniques relies on the varnish being thinned.  Hence the experiments with the gloss version of Osmo (which is very low volatiles and very easy to apply).  Trouble is, it's not a true gloss the way it's come out on my attempts.

Here's the Alembicesque with Ronseal:

Jhsi0uNl.jpg

 

And my own one, using the glossy version of Osmo - everything else being identical .... same wood , same pre-treatment:

IDZjI4Zl.jpg

 

When I get a break in playing the above one, I'll be taking the bits off and giving it a quick coat of Ronseal, just to get that beautiful figuring to pop out.

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19 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

With the old formulation of Ronseal Hardglaze, I used to do the basic build-up at about 30-40% thinners and then, for the final couple of wetting wipes, around 50%. 

But the new formulation doesn't like that at all.  What happens is that the attraction of itself to itself is stronger than the adhesion to the surface - even a roughed up one.  The wet varnish literally parts itself in random places, leaving deep streaks all the way down to the untreated surface - not usable.

The trouble is, using wipe-on techniques relies on the varnish being thinned.  Hence the experiments with the gloss version of Osmo (which is very low volatiles and very easy to apply).  Trouble is, it's not a true gloss the way it's come out on my attempts.

Here's the Alembicesque with Ronseal:

Jhsi0uNl.jpg

 

And my own one, using the glossy version of Osmo - everything else being identical .... same wood , same pre-treatment:

IDZjI4Zl.jpg

 

When I get a break in playing the above one, I'll be taking the bits off and giving it a quick coat of Ronseal, just to get that beautiful figuring to pop out.

Though the top one is superb, I could live with the bottom one.....

Carry on the good work, young man...

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21 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

With the old formulation of Ronseal Hardglaze, I used to do the basic build-up at about 30-40% thinners and then, for the final couple of wetting wipes, around 50%. 

But the new formulation doesn't like that at all.  What happens is that the attraction of itself to itself is stronger than the adhesion to the surface - even a roughed up one.  The wet varnish literally parts itself in random places, leaving deep streaks all the way down to the untreated surface - not usable....

I'm wondering if there is an electrostatic effect at play here.

Have you got a room ioniser?  If you could get a charge onto the wood and apply an opposite charge to the liquid would it improve things?  Like powder coating only with liquid.

 

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1 hour ago, SpondonBassed said:

I'm wondering if there is an electrostatic effect at play here.

Have you got a room ioniser?  If you could get a charge onto the wood and apply an opposite charge to the liquid would it improve things?  Like powder coating only with liquid.

 

I don't think it is that, John (although you never know).  I'm going by the fact that my wife's pottery glazes do the same thing - again when the bond with itself is stronger than the bond with the fired clay.  I think she calls it creep - although she may have just been referring to me generally....

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1 hour ago, TheGreek said:

Though the top one is superb, I could live with the bottom one.....

Carry on the good work, young man...

Yes - in many ways it's absolutely fine, but for some of the figured woods you get an extra shot of wow from the true glosses.  If you didn't see them next to each other, you'd never really think about it.

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41 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

With the old formulation of Ronseal Hardglaze, I used to do the basic build-up at about 30-40% thinners and then, for the final couple of wetting wipes, around 50%. 

But the new formulation doesn't like that at all.  What happens is that the attraction of itself to itself is stronger than the adhesion to the surface - even a roughed up one.  The wet varnish literally parts itself in random places, leaving deep streaks all the way down to the untreated surface - not usable.

The trouble is, using wipe-on techniques relies on the varnish being thinned.  Hence the experiments with the gloss version of Osmo (which is very low volatiles and very easy to apply).  Trouble is, it's not a true gloss the way it's come out on my attempts.

Here's the Alembicesque with Ronseal:

Jhsi0uNl.jpg

 

And my own one, using the glossy version of Osmo - everything else being identical .... same wood , same pre-treatment:

IDZjI4Zl.jpg

 

When I get a break in playing the above one, I'll be taking the bits off and giving it a quick coat of Ronseal, just to get that beautiful figuring to pop out.

I’m with the @TheGreek the Ronseal looks a lot better (the osmo stills looks great) as the grain just pops being more glossy 

I found that if I brush the first coat on unthinned trying not to leave too many ridges then leave it for a day then do the rest of the coats wiped on thinned it seems to go on better (but that’s just my technique) 

But I’m a bit odd I like gloss on natural wood but satin on painted......

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I'm now eyeing up that tin of high VOC hardglaze that I have sitting in the garage. There must be at least a litre left in the tin. I wonder how old it is, what state it's in and how much it might be worth to someone :D

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Well, it's getting closer.

The last bits always take an age but I'd be surprised if I can't finish it this week.

Final weight, putting everything left to fit on the digital scales, is looking like a touch under 5 1/4 lbs :)

LRfhNmKl.jpg

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And finished!

I've wired the electrics '50's style' to give a broader range of tone possibilities if Jane needs them in the future and added magnets for the cover with a thumbnail access:
gh2dri3l.jpg


 I know guitars - particularly slim guitars and fancy wood guitars - and gold trimmings aren't everyone's taste but, ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the 5lbs 4oz Swift Lite Mark 2

lJ8UqTel.jpg
dzBAeKil.jpg
iV5WYMtl.jpg
2GQ7l9dl.jpg
XF7kKdDl.jpg
nDlTgINl.jpg


As always, many thanks for the encouragement and help along the way - always greatly appreciated!  
:hi:

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All I can say is; holy smoak, what a beaut!

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The knobs are a success.

Elsewhere today, someone said something like; guitars should be fiesta red and basses should be understated.  The sentiment still works here.  Gold and burl suit this guitar.  I'd take it down for a play if it was in a shop.  It wouldn't be so attractive on a bass.

I wish your client many happy years with this instrument.

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Can't see how your client wouldn't be happy...

Great work (as usual)..

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