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Funky Dunky

Yet another thread about flats

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Sorry!

Just threw a set of Fender flats on, I love the tone and wanted to give 'em a try.

I understand it takes time for them to break in. Straight off the bat they don't sound much different. Boooo.

Higher tension. Ouch.

My bass needs set up again. Something has gone awry. The action is high so I relaxed the truss rod a tad, and lowered the saddles. For my trouble, I got fret buzz and the action isn't noticeably lower.

Any tips on how to adjust?

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[quote name='Funky Dunky' timestamp='1509674802' post='3400824']
Sorry!

Just threw a set of Fender flats on, I love the tone and wanted to give 'em a try.

I understand it takes time for them to break in. Straight off the bat they don't sound much different. Boooo.

Higher tension. Ouch.

My bass needs set up again. Something has gone awry. The action is high so I relaxed the truss rod a tad, and lowered the saddles. For my trouble, I got fret buzz and the action isn't noticeably lower.

Any tips on how to adjust?
[/quote]
Hi
If the action has increased I would have thought you would need to tighten the truss rod as it sounds like the neck relief has increased which has increased the action. Maybe try tightening the truss rod, just make sure to make a mental note of how much you have tightened it. That being said I am no expert on setups, I am sure others will be along soon with suggestions

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Changing to flats will tend to increase the relief (i.e. string height in the section of the neck that the truss-rod acts on). This is because flats have a higher tension compared to rounds of the same gauge. Your first move should have been to tighten the truss-rod to get the neck relief (as measured at F7 with a capo on F1 and string stopped where the neck meets the body) back to where you like it. You shouldn't really have needed to touch the bridge/saddles, although you can often drop them a bit to get the lower action that flats typically deliver. You don't mention what gauge your rounds and flats are but you'll need to make sure that your nut slots are right for the new flats.

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[quote name='Funky Dunky' timestamp='1509785166' post='3401566']

They don't sound at all like flats at the moment though. I wonder how long they take to break in?
[/quote]

Bit strange that - though I've never tried Fender flats. They must be aimed at users who want flats with a brighter sound. Maybe they're wound with wire rather than tape and then ground down.

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[quote name='scrumpymike' timestamp='1509794273' post='3401677']


Bit strange that - though I've never tried Fender flats. They must be aimed at users who want flats with a brighter sound. Maybe they're wound with wire rather than tape and then ground down.
[/quote]

Well I thought it odd, too, but I read some posts on a faaaaaaar inferior bass forum where users said give them a month of playing-on. Not what you want, though, is it?

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[quote name='Funky Dunky' timestamp='1509785166' post='3401566']
45-105. I tightened the truss and we're all good!

They don't sound at all like flats at the moment though. I wonder how long they take to break in?
[/quote]

A little while. Bear with them.

If they feel a bit sticky at the moment, give them a rub with an old t-shirt.

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[quote name='wateroftyne' timestamp='1509800984' post='3401734']


A little while. Bear with them.

If they feel a bit sticky at the moment, give them a rub with an old t-shirt.
[/quote]

Thanks for the tip, WoT :)

Edited by Funky Dunky

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[quote name='wateroftyne' timestamp='1509800984' post='3401734']


A little while. Bear with them.

If they feel a bit sticky at the moment, give them a rub with an old t-shirt.
[/quote]

Good suggestion. I think they put some kind of gunk on them to prevent corrosion whilst they're in the packet. Give them a clean with a spot of meths or white spirit and they feel nicer under the fingers.

Fender flats look like re-badged D'Addario Chromes to me. They even have the same coloured ball ends, although the thread winding is green, rather than blue.

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I've currently got Fender flats on my P bass and Chromes on my jazz basses and they are definitely not the same string, the fenders are a much duller metal whereas the chromes are bright and shinny and I think a little higher tension,, and whilst the ball ends are coloured the chromes have a black D string ball whereas the Fender is silver, and whilst the other ball ends are similar colours they are not the same shade, or even the same size. D'addario may or may not make them but they're not the same string, I think I prefer the chromes but it's a close run thing and probably depends on which side of bed I got out of!

They're both quite bright to start with but mellow nicely, as for being sticky, that's the one down side of flats, particularly once you've been playing in a hot room for an hour, there's just more friction between finger and string, I find a little bit of "fast fret" before a set works welll.

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