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chrisanthony1211

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Everything posted by chrisanthony1211

  1. Would trade for a similar value 70s jazz bass.
  2. That’s some serious sexy 70s Mocha, you got any trade options?
  3. Well that’s just bloody lovely, I have a 71 CAR jazz which this would look beautiful sat next to.....🧐
  4. I contacted Kevin at Henretta who got back to me about the Orange Whip with the below: I do like the look of this, I like simplicity and can wind myself up if I get too many knobs to twiddle....and relestate on my pedalboard is at a premium!!!
  5. Seen the review but missed the part about the low B, I think I may give this a go.
  6. Anyone used one of these with bass, tiny footprint and looks pretty good but can only find a few reviews, and they are all ilwirh guitar....
  7. Great condition and comes with power and boxed. Has compressor, boost, sansamp, octave, envelope filter and chorus and tuner. I only ever used the sansamp, tuner and compressor so ended up getting myself a programmable sansamp instead and don’t use this anymore. Has a very good built in DI and a tiny foot print. excellent condition
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  9. So here is my 71 Jazz bass refinished in candy Apple red I got from a fellow basschatter a couple of months ago. She had a reissue pickguard on when I got her which I replaced with a genuine 69 tort pickguardwhich I got from Axel in Germany, and the soldering was quite shoddy which I’ve redone, I’ve also shielded all the cavities so she is now as quiet as a mouse. String with Rotosound 77 Jazz flats this is my main gigging bass, she is the “bomb”.
  10. Strings strings string, the cheapest but one of the most important parts of your rig, I currently use Rotosound Jazz 77 flats on my Jazz basses and they are the “bomb”. Ever so slightly textured so you don’t get that horrible sticky feeling after an hour of playing, and sound awesome too. ive trues TI flats a few time but they just seem to have no “balls.....””
  11. 28 gigs this year, it does seem to be getting harder and harder to get gigs, another live music venue in Docaster is just about to close down
  12. My mum had it in both wrists so there may be a genetic element, I do some cumputer work which certainly doesn’t help. Top tip if you use a computer for work is to get one of those vertical mouses, they are fantastic!
  13. I think it’s worth saying that I didn’t find the procedure or the recovery particularly traumatic, everyone is different but the whole process was pretty straight forward for me. The initial local anaesthetic into the wrist is not pleasant, but it’s over pretty quickly and the surgery was done and dusted in half an hour. The best recovery is to get playing bass ASAP 🙂
  14. Well the right one was done 8 weeks ago and is going well, if that left one can stay the way it is then all should be good, time will tell.. my symptoms were mostly at night, 02:00 in the morning id wake up in quite a lot of pain, during the day I would have very little, occasionally I may get some numbness when driving but it was mostly at night.
  15. Well the right one was done 8 weeks ago and is going well, if that left one can stay the way it is then all should be good, time will tell..
  16. Well this could be a disappointing thread! No surgery for me today, the surgeon said that because I have no current symptoms it would be wrong to operate at the moment and all he can do is make it worse. I have an open appointment for three months to go back if the symptoms do return, I shall come back on here if my symptoms do return and I get the chop.
  17. Just finished shielding the bass this morning and buzz all gone whether I’m touching the strings or not, that’s a lesson for me, shielding not grounding!!
  18. When shielding a jazz bass do you have to connect all the shielded cavities to earth, the fact that the copper plates installed by in the factory underneath the pickup and control cavities are all connected to earth would surely earth the copper shielding sat underneath them, am I right?
  19. To be honest my left hand doesn’t give me much problems at the moment so I’ve been in two minds whether or not to get it done, however I’ve not been particularly active since I had my right one done which may be the reason. I just know that if I don’t get it done, come the the summer when I’m back in the gym, cutting the grass, hedges and tree that it will be back. My nerve conduction test had my left as being pretty bad so i shall get it done whilst I can (and it gets me Christmas off work!)
  20. Well I'm booked into have my left done on Tuesday which is eight weeks after I had my right one done. Whilst I played a gig 17 days after the surgery on my right hand it's still not 100% and still has some healing to be done, there is still a very slight numbness in my finger tips, if I have a day in the office on the computer it's very sore the next day, and the cold plays bloody hell with it. Fortunately playing bass is absolutely fine 👍 Gonna do a bit of a carpal tunnel recovery blog (with photos) on here for anyone who finds themselves in a similar position and wants to see what it's all about, see you on Tuesday night, wish me luck!
  21. It's true, I just tried the experiment he suggested, turn the amp right up and move away and no hum, the closer I get the guitar starts to hum, pick it up even more hum, touch the strings or any other metal grounded part and it goes away (the bass grounded me!) did the same with my shielded Precision and no hum!! need to get this baby shielded before I go for my second carped tunnel on Tuesday!
  22. The below I found on the net seems to make sense to me, how could I possibly be grounding the bass when I touch the strings when I'm not grounded myself!!!! "And how, pray tell, are you grounding the guitar? Are you standing barefoot on a metal plate? Or touching a water pipe, perhaps? Your body acts as a shield, and the guitar is grounding you. Your body, on account of being much larger than the wiring inside the guitar, picks up noise much better. When you're simply holding the guitar without touching any grounded metal parts, you simply radiate any noise you pick up right into the guitar's wiring. Hence the noise. As soon as you touch a grounded metal part on the guitar (such as the strings), you're grounded through said metal part, and the noise will disappear, as it's being shorted to ground. This is why shielding the guitar should help, as it'll provide a permanent, always-grounded layer of protection between the noise and the guitar's circuitry. Here's a couple of fun experiments to try. Plug your guitar into your amp and turn it up. Don't touch any metal parts. Unless your guitar is well shielded, you should hear some noise. Now place your hand over any of the pickups, while still avoiding the strings. The noise should increase. Try moving your hand closer to, say, a computer monitor. The noise should increase even more. Now put the guitar away from your body (while it's still plugged in). The noise should decrease. This shows how your body is acting as a channel for noise. And unless there's another shield in place between you and the guitar, you'll have to ground yourself through the guitar to avoid bleeding that noise into the circuitry. Also, when you touch the strings and the hum increases, it's a sign that the bridge (and hence the strings) isn't grounded. The reason is that you're inserting the noise into the strings, which in turn concentrate it right above the pickups (which are extremely effective antennae), rather than sending it to ground via the bridge."
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