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jbn4001

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  1. I guess it comes down to several factors such as musical ability of individuals in the band, and how well the band gels together (good communication). I've been in a band where the singer was a good musician with great time feel and expression. Before the next song, she'd always pause for a moment to get the feel and then count in the tune..and invariably it was always the right tempo (and pretty consistent across rehearsals and gigs). I've been in a band without a drummer. In that band, for many tracks, we made a note of our preferred tempo and the keyboard player would key it in on a metronome and count us in. Both methods worked well. I've also been in a band where we often finished a tune at twice the tempo that we started at. I blamed the drummer for that! Though generally, I am a believer in tempo being everyone's responsibility in a group.
  2. Well done all. I really must have a go myself sometime. Some very good recordings and compositions .
  3. [quote name='jbn4001' timestamp='1450293264' post='2931475'] My favourites are: Slade - Merry Christmas everybody : fantastic melody and words. Very uplifting. Lovely guitar tone. Great bass line.. Paul McCartney : Simply having a wonderful Christmas time.. Again, incredibly uplifting.. and I love analogue synths .. and this has great synth.. I think a Yamaha Synclavier I couldn't really give a stuff about any others. Those two stand out from my childhood and still make me feel happy at this time of year. Gonna go listen to them now,. [/quote] Actually - McCartney track was a Yamaha CS80, as used to great effect by Vangelis for Blade Runner soundtrack [url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0QpG2Z54QI"]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0QpG2Z54QI[/url]
  4. My favourites are: Slade - Merry Christmas everybody : fantastic melody and words. Very uplifting. Lovely guitar tone. Great bass line.. Paul McCartney : Simply having a wonderful Christmas time.. Again, incredibly uplifting.. and I love analogue synths .. and this has great synth.. I think a Yamaha Synclavier I couldn't really give a stuff about any others. Those two stand out from my childhood and still make me feel happy at this time of year. Gonna go listen to them now,.
  5. Hey - not too bad at all; I agree with comment on string noise, and a little too rubato here and there imho - but otherwise lovely playing overall. On another note --- I checked your other Sound cloud stuff. .. Is Sun & Air an original composition? It's lovely and i can't find it anywhere else. Bill Evans-esque and sublime. .
  6. [quote name='bassace' timestamp='1343660901' post='1753271'] Is this question posed in the context of running the mic to backline? If this is the case then feedback will generally follow whatever the quality of the mic and its amplification chain. But if you run the mic to front of house and not have monitors too close it will work very well. Only trouble is the audience will enjoy the great double bass sound but you won't! You will have to run a pickup to backline to hear yourself. [/quote] Reviving this old thread --- I'm just researching using mic in a live situation on double bass. I have both a DPA4099 and Headway EDB2.. and also a KK Bassmax pickup and Platinum Pro. I have a question directly on the above quote: how come putting mic signal through FOH and pickup only through monitor reduces likelihood of feedback? Surely the mic will still "hear" the monitor which is producing the sound from the pickup - which ought to be similar to the sound the mic is picking up ..and thus feedback? A lot of people seem to do this so the approach obviously has merit. I just want to understand why! Incidentally, my situ is I'll be playing in a jazz duo - hollowbody guitar + double bass in a fairly big restaurant/bar next week. We plan on using our own amps.. taking the output into the house PA which has speakers dotted around the venue.
  7. Hi to all in this thread. Somewhat late response - apologies for that. Just wanted to say thanks all for your detailed responses. Very helpful advice that I can keep in mind for next time I record with a group.
  8. [quote name='ubassman' timestamp='1389821241' post='2338388'] You might try also posting this in the recording forum - there are plenty really knowledgable techie types in there ! [/quote] Thanks for advice. I've posted there and edited the original post in the db forum
  9. Hi there, I have had a dpa4099b for about 4 months. I've not gigged in a while so haven't used it that much. I also have a Headway EDB2 pre amp to go with the mic. I recorded a demo in a jazz quartet at the weekend (drums, double bass, trumpet, guitar). We recorded live in one room , albeit in to 8 mics and channels (1 ambient room mic, 4 mics on drums, bass, guitar, trumpet). We were set fairly well apart as the room was large. I was partitioned off with half height boards and bits of padding. The problem: A lot of "bleed" or "spill" of all the other instruments in to the dpa mic. So the bass sounds fantastic on the recording, but the cymbals and the trumpet in particular bleed in to the mic which results in too much ambience in the recording - it sounds like the trumpet is playing far away in a bathroom! Short of playing alone in an isolated room, how can I avoid this excessive bleed? I'd like to use the mic at gigs as well as recording, but am now unsure how viable that is given the above experience.
  10. I've now posted this in the Recording forum here:[url="http://basschat.co.uk/topic/227150-dpa-4099b-mic-on-double-bass-problems-seeking-advice/"]http://basschat.co.uk/topic/227150-dpa-4099b-mic-on-double-bass-problems-seeking-advice/[/url]
  11. [quote name='winterfire666' timestamp='1384449533' post='2276882'] its played on a bass? [/quote] ^^ Tongue in cheek but surely this? That and context - what sort of tune and dynamics is the bass solo in? There are a lot of negative comments on this thread, I guess with some justification as there are a lot of ..not great.. bass solos out there. Why is that? My theory is because many bass players are not accustomed to playing melodies so when they try a solo.. it often sounds like a slightly modified bass line, or much worse, they feel compelled to play tonnes of notes in the hope that it compensates for the lack of melody (it usually doesn't). Good bass solos do exist.. and they sound good because in themselves they are likely melodic and make good use of rhythm.. and have accompaniment that is sympathetic to what is being played. ... like a solo on any other instrument. I sometimes think it is more difficult to solo on four strings because to move across large intervals you need to move up and down the neck a lot and that a guitarist has at least two octaves available without moving up or down the neck. Examples: I like the solo on [b]Clockmaker by The Impossible Gentlemen[/b] (modern jazz) ..I'd forgotten about [b]Radio Ga Ga by Queen [/b]and heard it on the radio the other day. Check the last minute or so of the tune going to fade out. That's an electric bass solo in pop song IMHO - and it sounds great. John Deacon had a fantastic grasp of melody, harmony and rhythm.. one of the best pop/rock bass players ever IMHO.
  12. Hi, caveat: I'm not an expert, however I've been taking regular lessons for two years including bowing. Things that affect tone massively: - the amount of "arm weight" you apply to the bow. .. this should be a "natural" arm weight - let your whole arm weight rest (relax) in to the bow via your hand. Do not "press" or push the bow in to the string, otherwise it sounds stiff/tense - not bowing perpendicular to the string for the entire length of the note. - not applying the string fully to the neck with your left hand. I used to do all three at once and it sounded terrible! If I'm learning a new piece or exercise, I am still prone to doing at least one of the above and have to remind myself and put myself in to a good, relaxed frame of mind to apply all 3 bits of advice correctly. I'm not sure what techniques would be involved in viola or cello and thus may be showing grandma how to suck eggs.. :/ Re the unintended harmonics, I think they could be one or both of arm weight to bow and not applying string fully to neck as I used to get this all the time when I first started learning to use bow. HTH
  13. +1 Exactly what I did. After that, I rented one for £30 a month from Thwaites (a bit far from Huddersfield admittedly, but perhaps there are shops that do rentals not too far from you too. Incidentally, Thwaites is a 90min drive from me. It was worth it though as I was able to try out db to see if I was going to like it without a big outlay). [quote name='AndyBass' timestamp='1381778510' post='2243694'] When I wanted to try one out I booked a lesson with a local teacher. I figured that way I'd get to have a go, but also learn some of the (very) basics right from the off. There's plenty of teachers in Sheffield if you're ever round this way, don't know about Huddersfield I'm afraid. [/quote]
  14. Hi . I fit my double bass, 12" cab, amp, electric bass and one passenger in a Ford Ka!
  15. +1 for Thomas martin in your budget range. I had a martin made for me last year and I adore playing it. I think you'd be hard pressed to find same or better quality at the prices martin offer.
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