Jump to content
Why become a member? ×
Account Security - Two Factor Authentication ×

What is this?


EOS650
 Share

Recommended Posts

I saw a Victor Wooten tutorial on YouTube last week and saw him use a chord that looks fairly simple, but I don't know what it is.. I've only been playing bass for 2 months so....

I know that the D is the root and the other is the octave (the "7" in this illustration). By adding the D# ("8") what have I done? Does this chord exist or does it just sound cool? :) It's a chord isn't it? I might've gotten the fingering wrong from the tutorial, too....



G-------------------------(7)--------(8)----
D--------------------------------------------
A-------------------(5)---------------------
E--------------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='Stuart Clayton' post='53728' date='Sep 1 2007, 09:50 AM']It could be the root and b9 of a D7b9 chord.

Stu[/quote]


Sorry guys, too early in the morning for me, I should have said difficult to say without see the notes in betweeen, but D7b9 or Dm7b9 are the obvious choices.


Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='The Funk' post='53835' date='Sep 1 2007, 09:15 AM']The D (octave) and D sharp won't sound at the same time on the same string.

So there are just two notes playing: D and D sharp an octave up.[/quote]

Right...sorry, my mistake. So what is D and D# and octave up?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

an interval is the space between 2 notes, either the same or different. The numbers go up chromatically. The weird thing about it is when counting an interval, you count the starting note aswell as the finishing note so a distance of a tone is called a 2nd rather than a 1st like you would expect when doing a sum in maths for instance. an octave is called an 8th so because it's just over an octave it's a 9th. However it's only a semitone, rather than a full tone over an octave so it's called a diminished 9th.

EDIT: sorry i was wrong it's a minor ninth.

Edited by EdwardHimself
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='EdwardHimself' post='53955' date='Sep 1 2007, 01:49 PM']an interval is the space between 2 notes, either the same or different. The numbers go up chromatically. The weird thing about it is when counting an interval, you count the starting note aswell as the finishing note so a distance of a tone is called a 2nd rather than a 1st like you would expect when doing a sum in maths for instance. an octave is called an 8th so because it's just over an octave it's a 9th. However it's only a semitone, rather than a full tone over an octave so it's called a diminished 9th.[/quote]


Thanks! Does a diminished chord have a semitone in it at all times or only in this case?

So, this is actually a A Dim9th? Or am I completely off?

Edited by EOS650
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='dlloyd' post='54012' date='Sep 1 2007, 04:34 PM']"Perfect" is all to do with some old dead guys' ideas of perfection in music... it comes from the fact that octaves, fourths and fifths are found early in the harmonic series... I wouldn't worry about it too much.

All you have to worry about is that fourths, fifths, octaves and unisons/primes do not have major/minor qualities... if you flatten them they become diminished, if you sharpen them they become augmented. Fourths and fifths are also the only intervals you commonly find to be augmented or diminished.

The other intervals tend to either be major or minor... if they stray above or below that they become augmented or diminished.

A "bb" is a double flat, as you figured. You sometimes also see double sharps, which are denoted by "x" or "##". You don't see them often.[/quote]

Thanks again. I might print that out if you don't mind. My teacher and I were working on the root 5th thing and I hit a 2nd and he explained that to me...so I am learning....

So, only with "perfect" if you flat them, they become diminished and if they are sharp, it's augmented? With those other intervals, to flat it more than once would be diminished rather than once in the "perfect"?

Thanks for your patience!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='dlloyd' post='53976' date='Sep 1 2007, 07:44 PM']You were slightly misled.

This is a minor ninth.

A diminished ninth would be D to Ebb (which is enharmonically equivalent to an octave).[/quote]

oh yes i couldn't remember whether it would be a diminished or a minor ninth. But i mean it's basically a 2nd but an octave higher so i guess that was my mistake.

[quote name='EOS650' post='53968' date='Sep 1 2007, 07:15 PM']A Dim9th? Or am I completely off?[/quote]

no, for it to be an A chord, the note A has to be the root note (well not always but either way, it definetly has to be in there) rather than just the string it's on, don't forget that if a piano player plays a D, it's on the D string (well 3 strings actually but that's another story.) So the chord (even though it's not a chord) would start off with D. Then it's a minor ninth. So it's Dm9, you don't have to put the "th" bit after the number when writing a chord by the way, people know what ur on about with just the number.
However it's not actually a Dm9 because that only refers to the chord, which has at least 3 notes. What ur playing has only 2 different notes (given that the 2 D's, even though an octave apart, are still the same note.) So i think you have to put some suffix on it but i have no idea what it is.

Haha read this thread over several times and i think dlloyd and i have given u enough information to do ur grade 3 theory! :)

Edited by EdwardHimself
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic but thought it might be mentioning:

A perfect interval (5-1 or V-I) is used very often as an ending (or perfect ending) as it sounds very.... complete i suppose.
So if playing during a C chord you play a G then a C it will sound like the end of a song (if done right). Try it and find out.

Adversely an imperfect interval (4-1 or IV-I) will leave the listener waiting for another note. So again if playing in C you play an F then a C it will leave the listener waiting for another note. This can be a great technique if wanting to cause that little bit of tension.

Strange how the mind works eh?

OMG i can remember my music theory.... that certificate really does mean something :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...