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On ‎18‎/‎09‎/‎2019 at 00:06, Stub Mandrel said:

Hi Joe,

I struggle to play slap and have it sound half-decent. I can alternate octave slap/pops all day but struggle to be fluent playing more complex patterns with any force. It's not really a speed issue, more one of getting a pleasant sound! I've tried playing lines I know well by slapping rather than fingerstyle but they just come out as terribly stilted.

Have you got a favourite exercise for developing a more fluent slap technique taht isn't playing 'Higher Ground' endlessly?

Thanks!

Not really.  I feel that slapping is a very individualised technique and is probably best developed through listening and transcribing.  With that said, most slapping is based on very syncopated rhythms.  If you don't understand syncopation then that's wheree you'll want  to start. 

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Joe i'm going to make a taboo suggestion would you consider using tablature with you transcriptions and courses I think it would bring you a much wider audience for the non readers, hope you don't mind me asking, cheers Bob.

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Hi Joe,

Thanks for answering all our questions.

I've been playing for quite a while (30+ years) and a Pro at a quality jam night said that I have 'flying fingers'.  I wondered:

1. Is it really a problem?

2. How to fix/improve it?

Thank you, Paul

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On ‎07‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 07:44, thebigyin said:

Joe i'm going to make a taboo suggestion would you consider using tablature with you transcriptions and courses I think it would bring you a much wider audience for the non readers, hope you don't mind me asking, cheers Bob.

Most of my books have a tablature section included.

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On ‎11‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 14:00, pbasspecial said:

Hi Joe,

Thanks for answering all our questions.

I've been playing for quite a while (30+ years) and a Pro at a quality jam night said that I have 'flying fingers'.  I wondered:

1. Is it really a problem?

2. How to fix/improve it?

Thank you, Paul

I guess it depends whether or not you think it's causing you some issues.  Learning to play with better "economy of motion" will definitely allow you to access more faccility across your instrument.  I have a good video that breaks down left hand technique here:

 

Edited by Joe Hubbard Bass
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7 minutes ago, Joe Hubbard Bass said:

I guess it depends whether or not you think it's causing you some issues.  Learning to play with better "economy of motion" will definitely allow you to access more faccility across your instrument.  I have a good video that breaks down left hand technique here:

 

Thank you Joe.  Most appreciated. 

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On 15/11/2019 at 09:46, Joe Hubbard Bass said:

Most of my books have a tablature section included.

Thanks for the reply Joe

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There is a better, more productive approach to growing musically by focused targeted subject matter rather than slinging mud against a wall, along with a hope and a prayer…and by an organised system rather than random and erratic acts of nothingness :-)

Thank God for my Black Friday 50% Off Sale…For all my books!

…but there’s only 72 hours left!  So…hurry!

GET 50% OFF NOW

Use the checkout code: BFEARLY

All the Bass!

 
Joe

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Hey Joe! Any advice on walking concepts for tunes in 3/4 time? I already have your (excellent) walking bass book.

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Hey Tom

How's it going- long time Brother!

Melodically, a good place to start is by just using triads.  Experiment by not always using the root on the downbeat.  Rhymically, 3/4 often gives you the opportunity to use Ostinato lines as in All Blues.  Also when walking build your lines by first playing dotted half notes, then progessing to dotted quarters and then finally quarter notes.  This allows you to build dynamically over time.  For more advanced purposes, start to experiment by using the dotted quarter notes as a metric modulation concept over the 3/4.  For instance...2-bars of dotted quarter notes in 3/4 equals one bar of 4/4.  You can experiment with a drummer where he holds the original time in 3 down while you do that, or he can start to interprept the new 4/4 time over that with you.  Lot's of fun here.  I have a course on my 2-Year Bass Mastery Course which goes way, way into these concepts.

Hope that helps.

Best

Joe

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Hi Joe, in a conversation with our drummer on Wednesday the ideas of playing 3 over 4 and vice versa came up. Can you point out some songs or videos with some basic examples I can try, just to start to get a feel for this?

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2 hours ago, Joe Hubbard Bass said:

Hey Tom

How's it going- long time Brother!

Melodically, a good place to start is by just using triads.  Experiment by not always using the root on the downbeat.  Rhymically, 3/4 often gives you the opportunity to use Ostinato lines as in All Blues.  Also when walking build your lines by first playing dotted half notes, then progessing to dotted quarters and then finally quarter notes.  This allows you to build dynamically over time.  For more advanced purposes, start to experiment by using the dotted quarter notes as a metric modulation concept over the 3/4.  For instance...2-bars of dotted quarter notes in 3/4 equals one bar of 4/4.  You can experiment with a drummer where he holds the original time in 3 down while you do that, or he can start to interprept the new 4/4 time over that with you.  Lot's of fun here.  I have a course on my 2-Year Bass Mastery Course which goes way, way into these concepts.

Hope that helps.

Best

Joe

Thanks, Joe, much appreciated - I keep meaning to catch you at the bass show, and then I remember that I'm allergic to them... The notes from our lessons are still keeping me busy after all these years!

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44 minutes ago, Joe Hubbard Bass said:

Footprints on the Miles Davis record Miles Smiles

Proggy!

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1 hour ago, TKenrick said:

Thanks, Joe, much appreciated - I keep meaning to catch you at the bass show, and then I remember that I'm allergic to them... The notes from our lessons are still keeping me busy after all these years!

Good to hear Tom.

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On 30/10/2019 at 22:04, Joe Hubbard Bass said:

Yes there is.  This lesson will help.  Pay close attention to the detail covered.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXr75R2egt0

Thank you. Am I correct in assuming you favour raking over strict alternation in all situations? If so I have a follow up: what is your approach when raking meets string crossing? It seems, froim my experience, that, when skipping strings, one's fingers tend to favour leading with a specific finger, even if that means using that finger to pick a note and not alternate (if you follow me).

Thanks for your time

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On ‎25‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 21:52, wishface said:

Thank you. Am I correct in assuming you favour raking over strict alternation in all situations? If so I have a follow up: what is your approach when raking meets string crossing? It seems, froim my experience, that, when skipping strings, one's fingers tend to favour leading with a specific finger, even if that means using that finger to pick a note and not alternate (if you follow me).

Thanks for your time

When skipping adjacent strings, I would use the same approach described in the video- when ascending alternate; when descending cross with same finger.

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