Jump to content

Dear guest,

Welcome to the biggest community for bass players in Europe. You'll find the site a great source of information and advice.

Why not sign up now and:

  • Say hello - tell us about your playing, your gear and where you're from.
  • Search the database for inspiration or to find out more about your instrument
  • Upload an avatar and profile picture
  • Buy one of the thousands of items in our marketplace
  • Safely sell your items to a community of proven enthusiasts
  • Upload pictures, audio and videos
  • Buy exclusive items at discount through our shop (coming soon!)

Go on, click the button and become part of it today!

Sign in to follow this  
Jack

Live Recording - Behringer XR18 and Linux

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hey guys, please take it easy on me, I'm new to recording.

I've been using a Behringer XR18 as my main mixer for ages and I would like to start using the recording function. As I understand it, the mixer has the capability to take a pre-everything feed directly from the inputs and route that down a USB cable to a pc. Great, I'm fine with that and that makes sense to me.

The problem is, what do I have on the other end? I presumably need a pc (a laptop as this will be on a gig) that is recording that USB input?

Some questions that I have:

I'm a massive pc nerd, so at home I have a nice i7 6 core/12 thread machine with 32gb of ram. That's what I'll use to edit, process, mix and master these tracks. My laptops, however, are crap. I have a tiny netbook (no power at all but at least it's got an ssd) and an ancient core 2 duo Dell with 2gb of ram and a slow hard drive. Will either of these be suitable for simply capturing the tracks on the gig? The Dell would be the preferred option as it runs Windows (so software recommendations should be easier) and it's so totally unstealable that I'd feel safe with it at a gig.


Secondlly, what kind software do I use to capture the recording live and then process it later? My main desktop is linux and I imagine that there are lots of possible options for many operating systems (and you'll all have your own favourites), but what's the name for the [i]type[/i] of software that I need? Once I know where to start I'll go off and better educate myself rather than bother you folks with inane beginner questions.

Thanks,
Jack

Edited by Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hey Jack,

as far as I am aware - and I am happy to be corrected, Linux isn't so good for DAW capabilities, certainly in comparison to Windows or Mac machines. So, my first suggestion for recording software that will run on both Windows and Mac is [url="https://www.reaper.fm"]Cockos REAPER[/url] Which is a blinding application for the money. I have used it for years including some pro-release material.

It's a great application that doesn't suck all of your machine resources so will be good for lower power machines - I would however at least suggest a minimum of 8Gb RAM and say an i5 processor (quad core for a Mac).

That's pretty much all you'll need, but you will have to install the drivers for the XR18 of course, plug in VIA USB and set up the inputs in the application so that each channel records on to a separate track.

Funnily enough that's exactly what we were doing last week with our own XR18, but our laptop this time was running Logic Pro instead.

Had I have had the XR here, I would have created you a template to mail over to play with but it's at a different location.

Edited by dood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]Secondlly, what kind software do I use to capture the recording live and then process it later?[/font][/color][/quote]

Sorry, yes DAW: Digital Audio Workstation. (Cubase, Reaper, Pro Tools, Logic Pro and many others are DAWS)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.s. - Reaper is available as a free download to try out, but I bought the license within hours as I liked it so much. Many years later, still going strong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='dood' timestamp='1503862400' post='3361227']
Hey Jack,

as far as I am aware - and I am happy to be corrected, Linux isn't so good for DAW capabilities, certainly in comparison to Windows or Mac machines. So, my first suggestion for recording software that will run on both Windows and Mac is [url="https://www.reaper.fm"]Cockos REAPER[/url] Which is a blinding application for the money. I have used it for years including some pro-release material.

It's a great application that doesn't suck all of your machine resources so will be good for lower power machines - I would however at least suggest a minimum of 8Gb RAM and say an i5 processor (quad core for a Mac).

That's pretty much all you'll need, but you will have to install the drivers for the XR18 of course, plug in VIA USB and set up the inputs in the application so that each channel records on to a separate track.

Funnily enough that's exactly what we were doing last week with our own XR18, but our laptop this time was running Logic Pro instead.

Had I have had the XR here, I would have created you a template to mail over to play with but it's at a different location.
[/quote]

Thanks Dood, I take it the DAW is what I'm using to edit the tracks after recording, is that also what I need to record in the first place?

Sucks that Linux support isn't great, I'm not doing Windows ever again, I wonder if any of the rest of the band have decent pcs.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='Jack' timestamp='1503869908' post='3361286']


Thanks Dood, I take it the DAW is what I'm using to edit the tracks after recording, is that also what I need to record in the first place?

Sucks that Linux support isn't great, I'm not doing Windows ever again, I wonder if any of the rest of the band have decent pcs.....
[/quote]

That is indeed correct. A good DAW will allow you to easily record and then manipulate your recorded audio including editing and mixing.

You will also hear people talk of applets called audio 'plug ins' too. Some DAW applications come with quite an array of plug ins, others not so. These plug ins are very useful and you can buy and install third party offerings to do a whole host of things!
A few examples would include effects such as adding echo, reverb or effects to each track individually- you might like some effects on your bass sound. There are plenty of plug ins that can do that including amplifier modelling. Wanna sound like you are plugged in to an SVT?
Plug ins also come in the form of Virtual Instruments too that can either be programmed to play sounds for you, such as drums, piano, synth etc, or you can plug in a MIDI controller such as a keyboard and play/record those sounds manually in to your DAW.
The list goes on and I've tried to give you a few thoughts in laymans terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several decent open source DAWs available for Linux - I prefer [url="http://ardour.org"]Ardour[/url], which you might know in its commercial guise as Harrison Mixbus, but MusE and Qtractor are also popular choices. There's also a wide variety of audio plugins for Linux, following the LADSPA and (newer) LV2 standards - the open-source [url="http://calf-studio-gear.org/"]Calf plugins[/url] are particularly useful for processing live recordings, and I find myself using the Calf multiband compressor and EQ on pretty much all the projects I do.

You [i]can[/i] use a DAW like Ardour to do multitrack recording at a gig, but I normally like to use something simpler to record to a multichannel WAV file, then edit it with Ardour afterwards. [url="http://nosignal.fi/ecasound/"]Ecasound[/url] works nicely for these kinds of recording jobs.

[url="http://libremusicproduction.com/"]LMP[/url] is a pretty good starting place to get an overview of music production on Linux. You'll find lots of advice about configuring your machine for minimal audio processing latency. This is important if you're using things like software synthesisers, but irrelevant if you're just recording incoming audio to disk or editing the recording, so you don't need to worry about it for your purposes (e.g. you can use a large JACK period size which'll give you less CPU overhead).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to add that if you decide to go with Linux, you can always install WINE and use Reaper, it works perfectly through WINE.

BTW Linux works very well and Ardour is a complete and very good DAW that can compete with any other commercially available DAW.

There are lots of people posting music they have made using Linux (Ardour, QTractor even Reaper) on Youtube.

Here's a channel of a guy who makes music for advertisements plus his own songs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Q0PyzzDjUY&list=PLBvCHJWi9SXzxIvlkjBtRGTqQ9yyihyrz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×