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bigjohn

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About bigjohn

  • Birthday 23/08/1974

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  1. Yeah, been there, twice. Not because we knew them, both because the couple who got married wanted a live Neil Young Band to play their first dance. Neither of which were songs that we play, but hey ho. Both times the money has been comparatively too good to turn down and both were hard work. One of which was very much so. We've not done another and our duly increased price for doing our next one has been baulked at a couple of times since. I much prefer being "the band" at a venue, where people have paid to come and see us, rather than "the entertainment" at a random function. Cortez the Killer ain't a party song. That said, like pretty much anything. If the price is right, I'll do it, so long as it doesn't offend my sensibilities.
  2. I've pulled ferrules out with masking tape already on from factory fresh guitars. Doesn't take much.
  3. Yeah cone diameter means little. I used to get great tone and lows from a 4x8 I used to use at rehearsal room.
  4. Yeah, really, if it's in good nick, which it might be, you never know, then it's gonna be worth 100s of pounds. If it's as knackered as it might be, then it's firewood and junk.
  5. Yes of course. And that will be seamlessly added to the renewal price.
  6. Made by a French company and printed in Poland of course. Like any of this is going to make any difference to anyone other than making our lives more difficult and things more expensive at best.
  7. No. The legislative policy makers of the EU were, whilst we were members, literally us, the UK, in cooperation with all of the other member states. On top of that, any EU legislation that was applicable in the UK had to be passed by Westminster. This isn't political or a matter of opinion. It's just a description of how the mechanics worked and continue to work for EU member states. it is mechanically impossible for the EU to impose legislation on any member.
  8. Well yeah. Funny though, and I'm not having a pop at you Lozz, is the perception of the EU as a single, external entity. This is the root I think of a lot of Euro-scepticism and it's mostly to do with how the press portrays "The EU" and the relationship we have with it and had within it. We were "The EU". Every time it was EU this and EU that, the press were actually talking about the UK and externalising it. People have never got the hang of the idea that the EU is a membership of individual and sovereign states who all agree to exist in an agreed and cooperative framework. As soon as we leave, bar a trade deal, "The EU" essentially ceases to exist for us as individual citizens. We must get used to that idea. Each member country is as it has ever been (and we we were all along) to citizens of non-member states, an individual, independent, sovereign nation. Spain is Spain, France is France etc. For us, their membership of the EU is irrelevant. People are still talking like we're still Eu citizens. We’re not. These countries owe us nothing. It's going to take some time for people to get their head around that.
  9. It will be / is the prerogative of each EU member state how they treat visitors from 3rd party states.
  10. Thats not what I said. What I said was, pretty much every detriment to the UK that’s perceived as EU imposition is traceable back to UK government policy. Fishing rights is a prime example. It doesn’t take much to research it. But whilst we’re at it, all of the directives, regulations and decisions taken by the EU were done with the UK as a highly influential member with a veto which the UK government of the day has chosen to write into sovereign UK law rather than make use of. I said nothing about them being in Brussels. literally nothing, ever has been imposed on the UK by the EU against the express will and without cooperation of the UK government, If you have a problem with any of them, then your problem is with the UK government and not the EU. These are not my opinions either, they’re just plain fact.
  11. And in terms of restrictions and costs to work temporary contracts directly with EU based companies, across the whole of the UK workforce. I've done 10s of thousands of pounds of work for Irish, Dutch and German companies over the years without leaving my house (I work in IT). I'm pretty sure I won't be getting those jobs any more as I guess their payroll will require additional admin which will make it much easier to give it to a EU citizen. Before someone says that means there will be more UK work... it won't.
  12. TBF, this is a musicians forum and so the gripe about the effects on musicians is natural. In the wider scheme of things, it's not going to be just musicians though is it?
  13. Then if we were still members and our democratically elected representatives thought that the regulations were not in the UKs interest, then they could have been vetoed. BTW. The whole fishing rights thing is a complete red herring. The idea that the fishing industry has been decimated by the the EU is a fallacy. As usual with the UK, it has far more to do with UK government policy, which was to privatise fishing rights, meaning foreign boats bought and buy licences to fish what should be, under EU rules, UK catch. And also by the way, without complete change in this regard and a pay out of large compensation to the rights holders (some of whom are rich UK citizens who sub out their licences) this will continue after Brexit no matter what Cummings and his cronies would have you believe. Pretty much every detriment to the UK that's perceived as EU imposition is actually traceable in one way or another back to UK Government policy and has little to do with the EU in comparison. If you want to play the game of naming one that isn't, be my guest.
  14. Maybe. I think the problem with trying to positives though is that it allows people to gloss over the real problems that this amongst other aspects of Brexit will cause. Solutions and mitigation of those problems are what we need to find and the first step with solving any problem is admitting that they do exist.
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