Jump to content

Baloney Balderdash

Member
  • Posts

    963
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Baloney Balderdash

  1. I just recently read an article about Proco RAT's history, and the myth about this "Woodcutter" was mentioned too. Turns out he was just some guy who was really fast at assembling RATs, that's right, he didn't make them, he just stuffed the parts together, as you say, the same parts as everyone else, and he had no knowledge whatsoever about electronics or pedal design. The name is there so they could trace down any eventual faulty unit to whoever happened to assembly the specific individual unit in question, and this "Woodcutter" was as said really fast at assembling them, so he got his name on a lot of RATs, and the name he just got from a part time job cutting wood, to identify him as they had a lot of workers who shared his real name, which I fail to remember right now, nothing mysteriously really about it. I find it ambiguously funny and depressing/tragic at the same time how much especially guitard gear heads seemingly completely uncritically believes and continues to replicate pure myths as if they were nature laws and keeps listening with their eyes, like as if their aural perception is filtered through this thick layer of pure nonsense.
  2. Ibanez needs to make a new Fender Bass VI inspired short scale 6 string bass, that is a 30" short scale 6 string bass, meant to be tuned like a guitar, just 1 octave lower, and with narrow guitar like string spacing. Like the discontinued Ibanez SRC6, but with a bit wider nut, for not quite as tight string spacing at the head end of the fretboard, just like on their only current baritone guitar offering, that got a 45mm wide nut. Here's a random Google photo of the Ibanez SRC6, that was a more modern and a bit more bass focused take on the Fender Bass VI concept, released in 2014 and discontinued in 2020: My recently acquired Harley Benton GuitarBass, which is a much more traditional take on the Fender Bass VI concept, really had got me regretting that I didn't get an Ibanez SRC6 while they were still in production, as it is now they are not too common to find used and when there is one for sale it typically goes for prices near double of what they originally costed from new. I did ponder on getting one even back then, but wasn't 100% convinced that the concept would be the right for me, even if intrigued by it, however I love my Harley Benton GuitarBass, and if Ibanez ever takes up the idea again, even if just an identical reissue of the SRC6, without the slightly wider nut that I would love to see, I will make 100% sure to get one. I guess it is a niche product though, and the market is somewhat limited, which is likely why it got discontinued. Still with 6 years actually in production it must still have generated some worthwhile sales statistics, and perhaps with a slightly wider 45mm nut, compared to the original SRC6's 42 mm nut (identical to the nut width of the original Fender Bass VI), perhaps it would draw more attention from bass players (maybe especially with how short scale basses have become in recent years, and the extremely limited options on the market for 6 string short scale basses), since the SRC6 also seemed to actually be a bit more oriented towards bass players than Bass VI type instruments traditionally have been, though I guess the reasoning behind sticking to the 42mm nut of the original Bass VI instruments must have been to get the attention of guitar players. Who's with me? Ibanez product chief manager (or whatever the correct tittle of whoever's in charge of deciding which products are to be released, and which are to be booted, is) are you tapping this line? If you are we want a revisited version of the SRC6, or at least just a reissue! Also now we are at it, personally beside the wider 45mm nut, I would actually prefer a revisited model to just feature one single middle humbucker pickup, like placed pretty much just right in between where the neck and bridge pickup of the original are located.
  3. Most recent incarnation of my pedal board, for my 6 string 30" scale Harley Benton GuitarBass (Bass VI type instrument, strung with gauge .080 - .060 - .045 - .034 - .026 - .018 (plain string) D'Addario XL nickle plated roundwound hex steel core strings, tuned in G standard tuning, 3 half steps above regular E standard tuning) : For those interested the whole signal chain for the above setup, and some elaboration on how I use the different pedals, can be found in the "About" section of my profile here on the forum : https://www.basschat.co.uk/profile/50585-baloney-balderdash/
  4. I am also just as exited of my Joyo Oxford Sound as when I got it about a month ago. Now my always on signal chain in my "amp-less" setup us a lot more complicated and consists of quite a few more pedals and more EQ'ing, among those finishing with 2 tube preamp stages, but I believe I could get perfectly by with just the Mosky XP Boss (Xotic EP Boost clone), stacked into the Joyo Oxford Sound, at the start of my chain where they are positioned now, and then the 2 band bass parametric EQ model in my Zoom MS-70CDR, that is placed towards the end of my chain, right before ending with the 2 tube preamp stages currently, that I use to mimic an about 3.6kHz -12dB/Oct LPF, by having it set to [12kHz Q=1 -18dB // 20kHz Q=0.5 -20dB], that I use a faux cab sim. That is: Mosky XP Boost -> Joyo Oxford Sound -> Zoom MS-70CDR with parametric EQ mimicking a 3.6kHz -12 dB/Oct LPF, as a faux cab sim If I was only allowed to use 3 effects. The Joyo Oxford Sound really being responsible for the primary character of my current tone.
  5. And artistic rendition of the photo I shot of my Harley Benton GuitarBass:
  6. The Ibanez Mini Chorus is a pretty great analog chorus pedal, and the Super Metal Mini is an amazing high gain distortion. I'll never get used to people thinking and listening with their eyes, very strange phenomena to me.
  7. I love the old Trace Elliot amps, before first Marshall and the Peavey bought them. Regret selling my GP7SM, it was an amazing sounding amp, and now these seems to gettting rare and pricier (like most every other used musical equipment though) on the used market. Liked it even better than the Ampeg B-15S tube amp, that I one own, but also was stupid enough to sell. Have been pondering on getting one of the newer Peavey Trace Elliot Transit B preamps that are supposed to actually recreate the tone of the original old Trace Elliots really well as far as I gathered.
  8. Well, Harley Benton does use it on a lot of their sort of higher priced instruments, which really is more like lower/mid mid priced instruments compared to most other brands, and this GuitarBass being one of their mid priced instruments, which compared to most other brands would be more like mid budget price level. So don't know if it really is all that inconceivable, though I do think you probably are right, even it is what it says in the description of the instrument on Harley Benton's own page, but I guess I just took that piece of information and ran with it because it would explain why my specific unit is so damn heavy, while Thomann's spec list claims it's body is Basswood, which is generally considered to be a really light wood type. I suppose though that the Nato wood body part of the Harley Benton instrument description still could be true, even if the Ebony fretboard part isn't.
  9. Update regarding the question of which wood types actually is used for the Harley Benton GuitarBass: So I wrote to Thomann to get a confirmation on the wood used for this instrument, but they replied that after having one of their guitar technicians expect their demo model he confirmed that the spec list on Thomann's own homepage was indeed correct, that is a Roseacer (heat treated maple) fretboard and a Basswood body, despite not matching the description on Harley Benton's homepage. However I am not exactly entirely convinced about this guitar technician also being a wood expert, and how he could possibly even make a proper accession through the finish of this instrument, even if he really in fact actually should happen to also be an expert in wood. And in any case it still leaves the question why Harley Benton would claim the body being made of Nato wood and the freboard Makassar Ebony in the description of this instrument on their homepage, though the spec list on the same page does indeed match that on Thomann's. Also still it doesn't quite explain how a piece of basswood this size could possibly be so abnormally heavy as is the case, despite the fact that it is supposed to be a really light wood type, even when accounting for natural variations from individual tree to tree and even specific cut to cut out of the same tree. I guess it must remain one of life's great mysteries, and I guess I'll just have to learn to accept that I'd most likely never will come to learn which of the official claims match the actual truth, or even if either of them even does, and if the reality of which wood types used for this instrument could possibly be an entirely different 3rd mystery combination.
  10. Well, while certainly not my dream bass, which it is very unlikely I will ever get the funds to have custom made for me, at the moment it is my quite recently acquired Harley Benton GuitarBass (heavily Fender Bass VI inspired instrument, but with a fixed TOM style bridge, and a few other welcome differences, like for example a much flatter 14" radius fretboard, and a pickup switching system that actually works for immediate pickup combination changes on the fly while you are playing). My first Harley Benton, and despite all the praise I've read and heard about their instruments I was still blown away by what amazing value this instrument is, it really is true what I've read and heard, a simply a mind boggling, truly astonishing, level of quality compared to the money they ask. And after initially struggling a bit with the super tight guitar string spacing I am actually feeling quite at home on it now. Such a joy to play. Would you imagine, practically perfectly leveled frets from stock, and an absolute perfectly cut graphite nut, and that on an instrument that costed me what equals just about 190£ from new. Even the grains of the neck wood runs perfectly straight along the length of it, as it ideally should. Just wow! How is this even possible? Well admittedly the pickups are intolerably noisy when not touching any metal parts, creating a ground connection for the bridge ground wire, but aside from that they do actually sound genuinely great, and if it wasn't for that noise I wouldn't have any reason whatsoever to upgrade them, in fact I ideally would actually prefer exactly those pickups, just without that horrible loud hum. It also do have a couple of slightly sharp fret ends, but nothing that really bothers me, or that I even notice, unless specifically focusing on it. And that's about it as far as flaws goes, as far as I have been able to identify at least, and I did actually do a pretty thoroughly attempt at specifically inspecting the instrument for such. Otherwise seemingly absolute perfection, though I guess one likely would be able to find better tuners (the stock one aren't exactly bad though), a broader saddle part of the bridge, that would allow for proper intonation of a wider variety of string gauges (though the stock one does work perfectly for the strings and tuning of my personal preference), and this instrument is on the rather heavy side too, but those aren't exactly flaws as such. Well, and of course the strings it came with was pretty horrendous, and it did need a setup, even if the one it came shipped with, while not perfect, actually was pretty decent and absolutely playable, with pretty comfortable string action, without any fret buzz whatsoever, but those are things you ought to expect from just about any new instrument you buy, regardless of price point, at least from any mass produced instrument that you don't physically in person buy directly from a shop that offers a personal setup according to your personal preferences, but is shipped to you with a standard factory setup. I wouldn't mind a 4 string custom made 30" short scale MENSINGER Cazpar though, which might, might that is, just get within my range of what I can afford to spare for a bass, at some point at least. Something like this, just in matte black finish (or perhaps transparent black with a spalted maple top?), not 100% certain about the pickup choice, gold hardware, monorail bridge pieces, 17mm string spacing, and a figured Ebony fretboard: Or perhaps even a 30" short scale 6 string Cazpar, same specs, except 16mm string spacing: And I would definitely love a Simon Farmer Gus Guitars G3 Baritone (which is a highly unique take on the Bass VI concept), that is 30", 6 strings, but a slightly wider 45mm nut, and 12mm string spacing at the bridge), like this, just in black, or possibly purple, with gold horns, like the guitar and bass he made for Prince: http://www.gusguitars.com/product.php?model_id=10 http://www.gusguitars.com/modelpics/gpic10.jpg But that's like totally unrealistic, I will most definitely never get that kind of money to spare, unless I win in lotto, or inherit a large sum of money from a rich uncle I never knew I even had, or a generous Nigerian prince that isn't just an e-mail scam, but even then priority would be the custom dream bass that I have meticulous though out to my very specific specs and design, matching my personal ideal preferences in detail, which though is not really all that realistic that I'll ever get the kind of money required to have made either, and then if I still have enough money to spare I would get that Simon Farmer Gus Guitars G3 Baritone as well.
  11. Well, isn't that obvious, yet it is just a stripped jazz bass body with a generously routed neck pickup cavity that would have room for something like a a '51 P Bass single coil P Pickup, and possibly even a mini humbucker, at least a guitar mini humbucker pickup, or might be even possibly have room for cramming in a soapbar style pickup if it was custom made to fit the specific measurements (at least I think that cavity is a bit too narrow for a standard sized soapbar pickup)? At least one of those alternative pickup options/possibilities would probably be the route (no pun intended) I personally would go, rather than a J Pickup, quite possibly a '51 single coil Seymour Duncan Quarter Pounder P Pickup, which unlike any of their other Quarter Pound offerings actually got plenty of mids and sounds phenomenal.
  12. "So what?", about what you thought was being a point really being no point at all, or at least not the point you thought it was? It's either that or I have absolutely no idea why you quoted my post in your initial reply. I guess it is alright though to reply to posts without really having a point with it... *shrug*
  13. Exactly, at much much lower tension, and usually even gauge as well, than you would normally use for a low F# tuning on a 34" scale bass. Though usually 8 string guitars will have a scale length of around 27", but the point still stands.
  14. I really ought to make a standard reply and save it so I can copy paste it every time someone suggest abnormally thick gauge strings for short scale basses relatively to their actual scale length, it'll sound like donkey as soon as you go up the fretboard because of the increased stiffness/inflexibility of the strings in relation to gauge, regardless of the lower actual tension, being a function of the shorter scale as a result of the relatively shorter vibrating length of the strings, an effect that will increase exponentially as you go up the fretboard. Personally I prefer a set with a gauge .095 low E string for a 30" short scale bass, and I think that is the optimal gauge for a low E string of a 30" scale instrument, certainly you wouldn't want ever to go any higher than a gauge .100 low E string if you want it to sound decent, the thinner gauge strings will also result in more harmonic content, which already is naturally reduced due to the shorter scale length, you wouldn't want to add to that effect by equipping it with abnormally thick strings relatively to the scale length. You can't expect ripping the strings like if you were handling the string of a bow aiming for a long shot and fretting them like you needed to squash a walnut, if you adjust your playing style accordingly to the instrument you actually play you'll find that the natural lower tension of a short scale bass is actually not an issue, but rather makes for a really comfortable playing experience, instead of equipping abnormally thick strings relatively to the scale length, which will result in preventing them from vibrating properly because of the relative increase of stiffness/inflexibility as a result of the shorter vibrating length, just so you can go on handling your short scale bass like as if it was the exact same instrument as your 34" scale bass, but sound like absolute donkey, that is all thud and mud, with no sustain and no harmonic content, as a result. Try equipping a regular 24.75" or 25.5" scale electric guitar with the gauge of strings that'll give them the same tension as the strings on your 34" scale bass and see how that sounds, there's a reason for them being much much lower tension than bass strings, and that is the scale length, which as said results in accordingly stiffer/less flexible strings. For drop D on a 30" short scale bass though you do properly need a gauge .105 low D string.
  15. Now that I spend a little more time with this instrument, have gotten used to the narrow string spacing (sort of just a matter of getting back to it, since I do play guitar too, even if it must be something like a year ago or so I did so last time), and had time to dial in my "amp-less" setup to work optimally with it, I have fallen deeply in love with this instrument. Plays awesomely great, feels really good in my hands, and not least with the middle pickup soloed sounds amazing, really punchy and snappy with a nice amount of bite as well. This is definitely taking over as my main instrument. And I will be able to use it both as the basis for new ambient tracks with my main solo project "Fjernsind", with the G standard tuning I use in place of guitar for my alternative folk project "...and for such a long time", as well as the main instrument for my sort of stoner/doom rock project "all I nil", that I otherwise have used my 28,6" 4 string tenor bass, in G standard tuning as well, for, before I got this Harley Benton GuitarBass. Love it. Though I will need to find a replacement for that middle position stock single coil pickup that I love the tone of soloed, cause it is intolerably noisy (not too bad with my hands on some metal parts of the bass, creating a ground route for the bridge ground wire, but the hum is insanely loud whenever I don't). . Ideally I would want a humbucker pickup in a Strat single coil format, either a true humbucker double bladed one, or just one with stacked coils that'll kill the hum, but while sounding as close as possible to the stock one. I just have absolutely no idea how I am supposed to get one that does, unless in the unlikely case that someone else owning this Harley Benton went through that same process and succeeded to find such a pickup dial in with the right answer. I suppose my best bet would be a stacked coil design though, for at least sounding as close as possible to a true single coil pickup as possible, and Alnico 5 magnet based like the stock one. Eventually the plan is to swap out all 3 stock pickups, even if I don't really need more than just 1 great tone, and by far most likely will stat in that middle pickup soloed position for something like 90% of the time.
  16. Short scale Sterling Sting Ray ! Without any doubt whatsoever. As far as I am concerned it sounds better, has more frets (22 on the Ray Vs. 19 on the Mustang), and easier access to the upper ones too, which to me at least matters a lot. The just 19 frets, and even poor access to the last 2, of the Mustang is a joke if you ask me. But of course if you are one of those bass player who never ventures above the 12th fret and prefers a more old school vintage tone the Fender Mustang would no doubt still be the better choice out of those 2 for you.
  17. This new Harley Benton GuitarBass (heavily Fender Bass VI inspired), that I just got with the mail Thursday : You can read more about it here :
  18. Got it yesterday. First impression: Looks beautiful, mind I would personally have preferred a different finish, but for what it is it looks genuinely great, and I can't spot any obvious finish flaws. But damn, this is big and heavy, even though it is a short scale it is exactly as big as my 34" scale Aria Pro II Laser Electric Classic bass, because of where the bridge is positioned on the body, as well as the 6 inline tuners headstock, and also just as heavy as the Aria Pro, despite the fact that the body of the Harley Benton is supposed to be basswood, and my full scale Aria Pro features an ash body (haven't actually weighted it, but my best bet is just about 5 kg (~12 lbs) or so). Edit!!!: Ah, this explains it, apparently Thomann haven't updated the specs for this Harley Benton GuitarBass on their homepage, while this is what it says on Harley Benton's own homepage: "...the Harley Benton GuitarBass has a nato wood body and a bolt-on maple neck with a Makassar ebony fretboard...". (both those wood types being about as heavy as wood gets and extremely hard, sturdy and stiff. Used to be respectively a basswood body and a heat treated maple (Roseacer) fretboard, which is what it still says on Thomann's homepage) Edit #2: So I wrote to Thomann to get a confirmation on the wood used for this instrument, but they replied that after having one of their guitar technicians expect their demo model he confirmed that the spec list on Thomann's own homepage was indeed correct, that is a Roseacer (heat treated maple) fretboard and a Basswood body, despite not matching the description on Harley Benton's homepage. However I am not exactly entirely convinced about this guitar technician also being a wood expert, and how he could possibly even make a proper accession through the finish of this instrument, even if he really in fact actually should happen to also be an expert in wood. And in any case it still leaves the question why Harley Benton would claim the body being made of Nato wood and the freboard Makassar Ebony in the description of this instrument on their homepage, though the spec list on the same page does indeed match that on Thomann's. Also still it doesn't quite explain how a piece of basswood this size could possibly be so abnormally heavy as is the case, despite the fact that it is supposed to be a really light wood type, even when accounting for natural variations from individual tree to tree and even specific cut to cut out of the same tree. I guess it must remain one of life's great mysteries, and I guess I'll just have to learn to accept that I'd most likely never will come to learn which of the official claims match the actual truth, or even if either of them even does, and if the reality of which wood types used for this instrument could possibly be an entirely different 3rd mystery combination. Picking it up I also noticed how massive the neck is as well, really chunky, almost baseball bat-esque type, neck, but surprisingly comfortable despite that fact. And also the grains of the piece of maple that the neck is made of, exposed by the thin satin clear finish of the back of the neck, runs as good as perfectly straight along the length of the neck, as they ideally should for optimal stability and lowest risk for the neck to eventually developing a warp/twist, in theory at least, which the Makassar ebony fretboard, which as said is an extremely hard and stiff type of wood, is no doubt going to help with as well. After tuning it up and playing it acoustically: nice low action from stock, and no fret buzz at all, though the fret ends are a bit sharp here and there, and could have used a bit more thorough filing, but nothing that bothers me too much, also the stock strings feels a bit rough, and the low E string, with it's just .084 gauge, is way too floppy, but overall it feels comfortable to play, though it will take some time getting used to the super narrow standard guitar string spacing, constantly fumbling, my fingers tripping over each other, and hitting the wrong strings. Now I didn't actually plug it in before restringing it with gauge .080 - .060 - .045 - .034 - .024 - .018 (plain string) D'Addario XL nickle plated steel hex core roundwound strings, and tuning it to G standard tuning, as in 3 half steps above regular E standard tuning, as I planed to, and setting it up properly, so can't comment on how it sounded plugged in straight from stock, and with the stock strings. As said I can get the action just as low as I prefer it without any fret buzz whatsoever, that is ever so slightly below 2mm (~0.079" = ~5/64") low G (what would normally be low E) string side, and then declining towards just about 1.5mm (~0.059" = ~4/64") high G (what would normally be high E) string side, measured at 12th fret from top of fret to bottom of string (and with so minimal relief that the neck is very close to being dead flat), and could probably go even lower still without any fret buzz (in fact the actual measurements are slightly bellow the numbers mentioned, but pretty much fits spot on measured at the 17th fret), which is pretty impressive for an instrument in this price class. The nut slots are cut at perfect depth as well. Plugging it in first thing I noticed was how noisy it is when the pickup switch is on a single pickup, which I guess is what to be expected from single coil pickups, the noise does though almost entirely disappear as soon as you are touching the strings, creating a ground connection, so shielding it should help tremendously on this issue, the noise is not anything beyond regular unshielded guitar noise when 2 pickups are on at the same time though. My favorite position being the middle pickup soloed, which actually sound pretty great, other pickup combinations sound nice enough, but not exactly blown away by the tone. Played acoustically it does sound great though, and as said the middle pickup soloed sounds pretty great too, but I am most likely going to eventually upgrade the pickups for double bladed humbucker single coil format Strat pickups. Also the balance across the strings with the pickups adjusted right (that is low side being adjusted just slightly lower than high side) is pretty close to perfectly even, which I assume is thanks to the pole pieces of the pickups being stackered following the radius of the finger board. All in all I am really satisfied. This Harley Benton GuitarBass, Fender Bass VI inspired instrument, definitely punch a good deal above it's price class, and I can warmly recommend it. Here it is:
  19. No, it would most definitely not, not with that much longer scale length, for one because the tension of the strings would be that much higher, or with the same kind of tension the gauge of the strings insanely thin, and that is just one aspect of how that the scale length would effect the tone differently. Plus the pickups might be voiced differently. Most likely would sound closer to short scale 6 string piccolo bass rather than a Strat. Well, I prefer to use a pick for bass, and fingers for electric guitar, like acoustic classical guitar style. Not sure which I go with yet, but I kind of dread to think of how I will deal with the tight string spacing as well, haven't played guitar for a long while, though the longer scale length might help a bit with with it not feeling to cramped after all, the thicker string gauge though possibly making it worse.
  20. Unfortunately whoever was to deliver the package scratched them self in the butt and chose to call that an "attempted" delivery, so now I'll have to wait till tomorrow, unless they chose to pull the same trick once more. And customer service is absolutely useless.
  21. No the 2 mid controls just control 2 different mid frequency areas, only the gain is switchable, so you have two gain levels you can switch between. All I would want from a preamp though would be one basic main tone, and the capability to shape it the way I wanted, and then have all my other tones come from other pedals. Most preamps though really are just one channel, and then maybe a switchable drive, unless they are a part of a digital modeler. This one is by the way all analog.
  22. Tech 21 Steve Harris SH-1. Not at all just for sounding like Steve Harris, in fact really versatile, and with a switchable cab sim included to.
  23. You can sort of mimic a HPF or LPF by stacking several parametric EQs too, using the bass specific parametric equalizer model as it has a wider range of boost/cut, and experimenting with the exact settings in a DAW with a VST based parametric equalizer first so that you get a graphic representation to base your settings on, in terms of getting the amount of cut, frequency and Q value just right. Also, not to dis you in any way, but with the firmware effect model hack it makes absolutely no sense to get the MS-60B (except of course if you are a collector of Zoom pedals), when you for the same price can get the MS-70CDR that unlike the MS-60B got both stereo in and outs as well as allows for a maximum of up to 6 effect models per patch, vs. the just up to 4 effect models maximum per patch of the MS-60B, plus perhaps possibly (I got no idea if this is actually the case though) also having more storage space for adding additional effect models (as I mentioned in my previous reply it at least have slightly more storage space for adding additional effect models than the G1Xon).
  24. YES! Tracking service says it is in the process of being delivered and that I should get it later today! So much looking forward to get my fingers on it. Just really hope that I haven't been unlucky in terms of quality control with my specific unit (would be such an anti climax, plus tedious to go through the troubles of returning it). As said I will write an update once I got it and have had a chance to try it out properly.
×
×
  • Create New...