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Islander

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  1. City of tiny lites - Frank Zappa
  2. My experience was positive overall. Junior school I learned to play a recorder to a halfway decent standard and sang in the choir. Secondary school I started to learn piano, decided it wasn't for me and picked up a trumpet instead. Our music department was full of enthusiastic teachers, I sang in the choir, took part in several Gilbert and Sullivan productions and attended the Newham Academy of Music for extra tuition. We were allowed to use the practice room at dinner times and after school. I suppose the oeak of that was playing the lead solo (Mozart's Alleleujah) at the Royal Festival Hall (The academy took it over for a day annually in a thing called Newham Goes to Town). Fun times
  3. Selecter's 'On My Radio' is unusual for a ska track, it's in 7/4
  4. I've got: An EKO ranger 6 that I've owned from new (that makes it about 45 years old 😮 ) despite its industrial construction it has a lovely tone and is really comfortable to play. An Epiphone hummingbird which is a very nice instrument An Adam Black 12 string that I won in a blind auction also a lovely instrument. An Epiphone LP deluxe that I've changed the electronics over to better quality components
  5. Technically that's true although the reality is that yes.it's possible to cause a buffer overflow in the image application, and it's technically possible to hide code in the slack space but hard to find a mechanism to execute it. However, the "load external images" feature is turned off by default on the majority of email clients - I honestly can't think of one that has it enabled by default and that defeats the problem (unless you choose to download them of course). Threat actors generally can't be bothered with highly technical acts when it's a simple matter to use social engineering and get someone to open an attachment i.e. maximum return for minimum effort. More sophisticated exploits are likely to come from state actors and not likely to be targeted at the general public. Almost all social engineering attempts exploit one or more of the following (this is from NCSC guidance): Authority - Is the sender claiming to be from someone official (like your bank, doctor, a solicitor, government department)? Criminals often pretend to be important people or organisations to trick you into doing what they want. Urgency - Are you told you have a limited time to respond (like in 24 hours or immediately)? Criminals often threaten you with fines or other negative consequences. Emotion - Does the message make you panic, fearful, hopeful or curious? Criminals often use threatening language, make false claims of support, or tease you into wanting to find out more. Scarcity - Is the message offering something in short supply (like concert tickets, money or a cure for medical conditions)? Fear of missing out on a good deal or opportunity can make you respond quickly. Current events - Are you expecting to see a message like this? Criminals often exploit current news stories, big events or specific times of year (like tax reporting) to make their scam seem more relevant to you. If you think about any of the phishing emails you've seen, they all use one or more of these
  6. The same principles apply for any device and OS really. I wouldn't assume that a different operating system would be immune although the majority is targeted at Windows.
  7. Information security professional here. The "I've had access to your system, files and contacts" email is a well known scam. Ignore and delete. You cannot trigger any form of hack by simply opening an email. You can, however, trigger a hack by opening an unsolicited attachment or by clicking on a link within an email - one could run malware immediately, the other could take you to a "drive by" site that has a dropper embedded that can push malware to you. Opening an email does not notify the sender. If they have added a receipt notification request, your email client will ask you if you want to acknowledge it. Always. If that happens, just click 'No'. Back your data up regularly and keep your backups offline. Always keep your computer and anti-malware up-to-date and remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it is.
  8. Horse Mcdonald playing solo at the Sound Archive. I've been a bit of a fan since I saw her in the late 80s on a Jools Holland programme. I have to say she's still got the range and powerand her songwriting is as good as it has ever been. It was a superb perfomance with loads of good banter between the songs.
  9. It's not a difficult job, it just needs a bit of care and patience. You don't need any jigs but you do need a few tools including: A notched straight edge and an allen key to adjust the truss rod A fret rocker and a levelling beam or fret levelling file - a beam is probably easier though. A fret end dressing file if it's a new fret job or the ends are uncomfortable A fret crowning file and a sharpie to mark the top of the fret wire Progressively finer abrasives to polish the fret wires If you want tutorials, you could do a lot worse than Crimson Guitar's YouTube channel. The advice given there is excellent plus you can see actual builds to see how it's done. They also sell high quality luthier tools.
  10. I'd challenge anyone not to find this performance powerful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXLS2IzZSdg&feature=youtu.be
  11. Nobody's mentioned The Band With Rocks In...
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