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Soloing using modes


Mike
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Hi all

I've finally started properly learning the modes (and not just patterns), which is something I've been meaning to do for a few years now. I'm not a confident soloist (in a jazz sense, not solo bass a la Steve Lawson) and I'm sure knowing my modes inside out will help me.

I'm in the process of learning them, but it's the application in a musical sense that's confounding me somewhat. I'm aware certain modes are most appropriate over certain chords (e.g. Maj7th, M7b5 etc) although I'm aware this can be slightly subjective, depending on the style of music.

Can anyone give me some nice clear help on real life application of modes for soloing please? I would be very grateful. I know it's quite a broad question...I've done quite a bit of research online but haven't found much that clearly speaks to me.

Using Cubase I've recorded some basic bass and drums in C, and over the top I have several comping piano tracks playing in C7, Cmaj7, Cm7, Cm7b5 and the rest. I just solo whatever track I want to practice a certain mode on. I've been using modes appropriate to each (e.g. Dorian/Aolian in Cm7) and it sounds "ok" but not brilliant.


Any and all help appreciated!


Regards,

Mike

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[quote name='dlloyd' post='66771' date='Sep 28 2007, 10:16 AM']However, if you use the appropriate modes for the appropriate chords, you're more likely to hit strong notes at the correct time.[/quote]

can you clarify what you mean by strong notes?

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As your man Mr Llloyd says, hitting those killer notes that spell out a mode can make you sound just 'right'.

Over a Cmj7#11 chord, play in the lydian mode and 'spell out' that #4 to 5. All of a sudden, you're playing the chord and not just the triad.

I'm sure there's a list of chords relating to modes, if not I'll knock one up.

Dan

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The answer given by dlloyd was excellent and comprehensive the only thing I would add is that to achieve a linear sense to your improvisation its worth learning modes globally as they relate to a key, and to apply melodic concepts as much as possible (listening to the way melodies work through changes is a great starting point for this) be musical where possible rather than applying techniques and your solos will feel much more natural
Jake

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