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Obrienp

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About Obrienp

  • Birthday 25/10/1955

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    Fakenham

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  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 1 post to view.
  2. Yes. The main thing I notice is much less fatigue in my left hand, arm, shoulder and back. Sound wise I really can’t tell much difference between my custom shortie (P/J) and the Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass I used to gig. I doubt the audience notice any difference, unless I am using my Ibanez EHB1000S, which being headless and sea foam green, does look a bit unusual. It is quite difficult to get bags and cases purpose made for shorties but as somebody else said, some shorties will fit into guitar cases and bags (e.g. the Ibanez EHB1000S). Fender do quite a good short scale gig bag for not much cash. Generally speaking I have found the move to shorties positive. Typically they are easier to play and generally less strain, although I understand the Reverend Watt Plower is really heavy.
  3. I recently sold mine, not because there was anything wrong with it, in fact the opposite but arthritis in my left hand is forcing me to go short scale. They are great bases but IMO the stock pickups were a bit weak. I put a DiMarzio set in which really gave it a new lease of life, plus they were a lot quieter. That mod plus, shielding the cavities with copper tape made it really quiet on standby. The DiMarzios have four wires, giving you the option of clever wiring combinations, should you wish (parallel/series on a push/pull, etc), or you can just use them vanilla. They have a super fast neck and are quite a lot lighter than your average J bass. They also look great with the lacquer style finish and top binding. The body does end up with lots of superficial scratches but I don’t think it is any more fragile than other finishes. Another common mod you might want to do is to change the standard bridge for something a bit chunkier. It is quite difficult to find one in the smoked chrome finish. Gotoh do one but be warned, if you have one of the models with the controls mounted through the body, rather than on a standard J bass metal plate, the top is carved (convex). In order to mount the standard bridge level, the top has a very shallow indent for the bridge. This route is not big enough to accommodate the larger base plate of the Gotoh (or any other) higher mass bridge. You therefore end up with the choice of enlarging the indent, or putting a spacer in so the new bridge will sit level. I gave it to a Luthier to sort out and he went for the spacer so as not to do a non-reversible modification. This required the neck to be shimmed to compensate for the slightly higher bridge. It all worked out very well but it wasn’t as straight forward as your average Fender bridge upgrade.
  4. Now I love the look of that but I have this:
  5. Thanks. I couldn't find them originally but I now realise that is because I was using my iPad to access the site. Edit doesn't seem to be enabled in the mobile version of the site. I logged on using my MacBook and hey presto, those dots are there.
  6. Thank you for your kind comments Ben. I hope you get years of good service from the One10.
  7. Hi Folks, I haven’t worked out how to edit the heading yet but this has sold.
  8. Yeah. It does sound too good to be true. I just tried it on the bathroom scales and they say 3 kg (6.6 lbs), so it must be in the region of 7 lbs, give or take. It does feel like picking up an acoustic in comparison to my other basses. The chambered body must be helping a lot with the weight.
  9. Yes. I just weighed mine with one of those baggage scale things: 5.5 lbs. I have changed the standard Bartolinis for Aguilar pickups, which were not as deep, so that might have had a marginal impact on the weight.
  10. Sorry, I don’t know how to edit my original post but should have said that I am not open to trades on this I am afraid. I am trying to cover the cost of a recent purchase and I also need to thin the herd.
  11. Update to the above. The machine heads are Wilkinson, not Northwest’s own brand. One of the pictures shows where the chrome has come off the edge of one of the retaining nuts. The grey marks on the nut are where I have used graphite (pencil lead) to lubricate the slots to stop the strings from binding.
  12. I bought this Bronco bass from PMT earlier this year as an interim, while I waited for a short scale to be made by a local luthier. It is the ultimate mod platform as far as I can tell. Stock it is a sound instrument, let down by some of the hardware. I have only used it my home studio but it is a lot of fun. I have made some modifications to it, as can be seen from the photos. I fitted lightweight tuners from Northwest Guitars, with 14mm posts. You can see from the photo that I have filled the original screw holes with the old toothpick trick. The electrics have been replaced with CTS pots and a decent jack socket. I have fitted a Tonerider Precision Plus (TRP1) pickup, which sounds great. I also replaced the bridge with a chunkier item with individual saddle adjustment but the same (approx 18mm) spacing. It uses the same screw holes as the original but is a bit of a compromise. The design doesn’t really allow for enough saddle adjustment to get the intonation right, so I have had to replace one of the adjustment screws with a shorter item and use a spring behind the back of the bridge to pull the A string saddle back a bit. The neck plate and scratchplate still have their protective plastic film but as you can see, I had to mangle the scratchplate to take the precision pickup set. There is a company on eBay who sell replacement scratchplates and will cut them to accommodate non-standard pickups. I have decided to cut my losses as far as that is concerned: I won’t recover the £25. Condition wise the body and neck are in very good condition. A few minor scratches in the gloss black but none that go through to the wood. You will get all the original parts with the bass, so you can put it back to standard if you should want to, although you will need to sleeve the post holes, if you want to put the original machine heads back, as I have enlarged them from 12 to 14mm. Try and buy in Fakenham, Norfolk. Will travel up to 100 miles to handover, if I get close to my asking price. I have the original box but I am very nervous about posting TBH but will do at buyer’s expense.
  13. I have decided to move on this hardly used Barefaced One10 to cover another kit purchase. I bought this cabinet direct from Barefaced just before lockdown, so it has been sitting in my studio without much use. It has never been gigged but I have somehow managed to put a tiny ding in the top edge (see photo), it hasn’t broken the vinyl covering. I also noticed while I was photographing it, that they were a little economical with the vinyl inside the top corners and you can see a tiny bit of the ply underneath. This is only visible with the cabinet upside down (see photo). A spot of black marker would cover it but I mention it for completeness. Comes complete with a Roqsolid padded slip cover. You are welcome to come and try it, or collect in Fakenham, Norfolk. I have a variety of amps you can try it with, or bring your own. I have the original (recycled packaging), so can post at buyers expense. I would also be prepared to meet you for a handover within about 100 miles.
  14. I agree with the sentiment, plus my Gnome is my backup amp. My main amp for gigs is an Orange Terror 500 that has 2 x Speakon sockets, which I use to connect two cabs. In order to have my Gnome as standby, I need to remember to pack a jack to speakon cable in addition to the two speakon to speakon cables. If I ever have to do a hot swap during a gig, I will need to unplug one cable, plug in the jack to speakon and reconfigure the cabinet cables so that they are daisy chained rather than coming straight out of the back of the amp. That’s a lot of faffing about under time pressure, possibly in poor lighting and often cramped conditions. Admittedly I could configure the cabinets to be daisy chained out of the Terror but given it has 2 speaker outlets, I am inclined to think there must be a reason for that, so I use them both. It would be great if the Gnome had speakon out (even a combi). That way the hot swap would just involve kettle lead and one speakon lead out of the Terror.
  15. One10s seem to be a match made in heaven for the Gnome. I have the basic 200 watt model but it sounds incredibly loud through either one, or both my One10s; so much so that I am thinking of moving one of them on because it is surplus to requirement with this amp.
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