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TrevorR

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Posts posted by TrevorR


  1. 3 hours ago, musicbassman said:

    I wasn't being serious Trevor !

    Re pipe lagging, I have tried this in the past, and found it much too dense unless you want a full-on palm mute effect all the time. Hence my suggestion of good old scourer sponge, which seems to be the best compromise.

    If I want a palm mute effect I simply do a physical palm mute, but obviously understand this isn't possible for those who can't or don't want to play with a pick or thumb.

    Neither was I... ;) Though, to be fair I do prefer the neater look compared to a chopped up bit of dish sponge...


  2. On 01/04/2020 at 12:47, musicbassman said:

    C'mon guys - your sponge damping is not supposed to look smart

    I beg to differ, I was browsing a bass group on Facebook and spotted these mutes made by a woman in the States. The happy customer comments caught my eye given that one was attributed to a certain @wateroftyne of this parish. Ordered a couple on a whim. They’re great, look good and the little handle makes them easy to get in and out...

    8E835A1D-3A87-446A-9E2B-D11B0DDB3EB3.thumb.jpeg.106625134addab25576f93cc939a8e78.jpeg

    0DEBBD67-99EF-4D33-9173-ADAF73C8BE46.thumb.jpeg.2ce30094d5b0292d4ceff33c41191e44.jpegD07A33A3-95F2-44C5-B3D0-CEC7BB772829.thumb.jpeg.f1fe5042f905e7b70cf1fb9282b88c5c.jpeg


  3. On 19/02/2020 at 10:27, Bilbo said:

    Here you go. Me playing my Wal with some dep guy on guitar. The lovely part of the story is that the last time I played with the drummer on this gig, a guy called Gary Wilcox, was in Cardiff 25 years previously and I had been playing the same bass on that gig.

    Etheridge.jpg

    Berlimey! Is that Mr Etheridge? Top guitar player.


  4. 36 minutes ago, Craigster said:

    Thank you for this very detailed reply. Going back to where you refer to the root, 3rd and 5th are these also known as the perfect 3rd and 5th and the root unison? 

    These intervals derive from the scale, so, in C (because there are no sharps and flats so it makes the visuals easier...). The C Major scale is... 

    C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C.

    If you give each note a number to show where it is in the scale you get... 

    1 C, 2 D, 3 E, 4 F, 5 G, 6 A, 7 B, 8 C.

    The first note in the scale is usually referred to as “the Root”. The 8th as “the Octave” (Latin for Eighth!).  Never heard this referred to as “root unison” - although strictly correct in grammatical terms it sounds made up - it’s always referred to as the root or octave.  This note has a frequency exactly twice that of the root - the scale notes’ frequencies aren’t random, they all have mathematical  relationships. All the other notes are referred to By their position in the scale, so...

    Root - C, Second - D, Third - E, Fourth - F, Fifth - G, Sixth - A, Seventh - B, Octave - C.

    In the MAJOR scale the distance between the root and the 3rd is 4 semitones - so because it derives from the Major scale, that 4 semitone interval is referred to as a “major 3rd”. 

    The C minor scale has some different notes as some of them are flattened by one semitones (including the 3rd - plus the 6th and 7th).

    C, D, E♭, F, G, A♭, B♭, C

    So in the minor scale the distance between the Root (C) and 3rd (E♭) is only 3 semitones. This three Semitone interval is referred to as the “minor 3rd” because it derives from the minor scale.

    Any 4 semitone interval between two notes can be referred to as “a major 3rd”, any 3 semitone interval can be referred to as a “minor 3rd”. For example... “So, from the G you go up a minor 3rd to B flat.”

    The 4th and 5th don’t commonly have these major/minor variants so can be referred to as perfect 4ths or perfect 5ths. But just 4th and 5th will do fine. They can be flattened or sharpened but in this case tend to be referred to diminished (down a semitone) or augmented (up a semitone).

    Hope that helps explain the terminology.

    • Thanks 2

  5. 9 hours ago, Craigster said:

    I still cant wrap my head around why you would use the term 'minor' to describe the 2nd and 3rd notes ( D & E) within a MAJOR scale

    You are confusing “scales” and “keys”. In any song in a major KEY the usual chord progressions are built around this pattern... 1 Major , 2 minor, 3 minor, 4 Major, 5 Major, 6 minor, 7 diminished.

    The chords within the key derive from the notes which are available to use in the scale. This link explains how the chords are built up from the scale notes...

    https://www.fundamental-changes.com/harmonising-the-major-scale/

    So in the key of C the notes on the scale are C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. Using only these notes the standard chords (Root/third/fifth) created are as follows...

    1) C E G - C Major - interval between C&E is 4 semitones, a major 3rd, making this a major chord.

    2) D F A - D minor - interval between D&F is 3 semitones, a minor 3rd interval, making this a minor chord

    3) E G B - E minor - interval between E&G is 3 semitones, a minor 3rd interval, making this a minor chord

    4) F A C - F Major - interval between F&A is 4 semitones, a Major 3rd interval, making this a major chord... and so on up the scale...

    5) G B D - G Major 

    6) A C E - A minor 

    7) B D F - B diminished 

    If you think about it simple songs on a major key don’t ONLY use major chords, there will be some minor chords thrown in, this relationship between the chords in a key explains why.

    Apologies for the God-bothering content but here’s the chord sheet for a song we do at church that demonstrates this for the key of C... there are the above minor chords scattered among the major chords...

    1E26747D-B23A-49DE-BA42-4CB0FB864D84.thumb.png.f1e38fac75f379a7f1effa1f8e35ee7b.png

    Understanding this principle is also really helpful in decoding/deciphering a new song a it gives a clue of what notes/chords might be available to use and might come up next...

     

     

     


  6. 2 hours ago, phil.c60 said:

    And if you expand the photo the VLE is in the off position, and the VPF  is at 12 o'clock.......assuming the photo is taken how the OP usually has it set.

    Ah, couldn’t work it out when I enlarged it. So that’s a pretty strong mid cut and bass boost then.


  7. OK, so we’re all going stir crazy... here’s a little quiz I saw somewhere else to pass the time and channel all those pent up creative urges... Post up a recreation of a famous album cover using just bits and bobs found around your (locked down) house. First person to guess can then post their own and so on... I’ll start us off...

    8C9A0391-2E87-4B7C-88C6-F93B47293B9E.thumb.jpeg.64b6371ebf1494eac9de5efb9549615b.jpeg

    • Like 1
    • Haha 2

  8. 3 hours ago, chris_b said:

    The filters are off when they are turned anti clockwise, pointing at 7 o'clock. Don't have them pointing at 12 o'clock.

    That’s always been my starting point. EQ at 12, VLE and VPF fully counter clockwise. As it is mostly my EQ is High and both Mids on noon. A slight touch of bass boost... maybe 1 o’clock, no VPF (never been a smile curve/mid cut fan) and a tiny touch of VLE (maybe around 8 o’clock). That’s a nice rich, punchy tone great for sitting in a mix with my basses and the way I play!

    • Like 1

  9. 3 minutes ago, Al Krow said:

    perhaps even better, a preamp pedal to brighten up the tone. I'm really enjoying my VT Bass DI - its 'bite' button seems to be a key ingredient. This provides a boost to the upper mids and treble so that the tone becomes more pronounced and 'present' especially in a mix. It also has a subsonic filter (i.e. HPF) to tighten up the sound.

    Completely agree about the VT Bass DI. Careful use of the “bite” button does add in a load of sparkly upper mid... kinda brings in a lot of that (what I think of as) “trade fair” tone, in a good way. Definitely worth exploring, especially with the “Character” control which allow you to vary the pedal’s core tone/modelling between a couple of classic amps and a more modern high gain tone.


  10. Tiran Porter’s tone on this track sends shivers down my spine! 

     

    Apologies for the God bothering content but I think the tone on this song is a great pick sound...

    Ironically reminds me a bit of Tony Butler’s tone back in the day with Big Country.

    Rather less God bothering... For all their Percy Jones-esque jazzy refinement those old Pro Series Wals could belt out a killer rock sound...


    And finally, always loved John Wetton’s bass tone on that first Asia album. The stabs about 1 min 50secs in are just immense, tone wise!

     

    • Like 1

  11. Just a quick Q... where do you have the VLE and VPF controls set? Full off? 12 o’clock? Somewhere else? They have a profound effect on the core tone of the amp.

     

    [Edit] Having said that, what EQ and gain settings are you using overall?


  12. 18 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

    Saw SRV at Reading on his first tour of the UK, saw Noel at De Barra's Folk Club (on guitar). I went for a pee and the great man came in and wazzed in the same trough!

    Jealous (of seeing Stevie, not peeing with Noel). Remember driving home one day in summer 1990 and randomly seeing a poster saying “SRV,  Hammersmith Odeon, October 1990” and thinking “Wow, I'd love to see him live.  I’m definitely booking tickets for that!” Then a week or so later the terrible news came through...

    • Sad 1

  13. I love acid jazz but was only vaguely aware of Corduroy until their bassist did a chat at a SE Bass Bash a while back.

    So why all the cheesy cabaret stars? My dad ran the butchery department at Liptons supermarket in Truro in the late 70s but ran it like a proper family butcher’s shop, priding himself on great service to the customers (he got great Christmas boxes from the customers!). One of his customers was the manager of Talk of the West, “Cornwall’s Premier Night Spot” (read “only”). It was strict chicken in a basket circuit with variety acts and bands on the way down with warm up provided by the Viv Rodd Combo featuring Viv Rodd on the Hammond Organ. Dad would regularly get tickets for the family given to him as a tip - him, me and mum. Chicken and chips in a basket included. I was only 12 or 13 so was taken along on pain of death that if asked my age I was to say I was 15. It was never a problem because the manager had always reserved us a good table and greeted mum and dad with “Alfie, Ada! Lovely to see you! Come on in, I've got a nice table reserved for you.” No one questioned me after that! Saw some great acts there - all the 70s TV variety-show greats. They were all great and spotting the kid in the audience were really nice to me, chatting and giving me signed photos and the like. All except Mike and Bernie Winters... Mike was really nice but Bernie was a right #@%*... Best performer of all, and simply the nicest person to the punters was Roy Castle. Saw him every time he came down. Total gent.

    • Like 1

  14. Just now, Jimothey said:

    The Merseybeats

    Seen them too! Way past the actual having hits phase but they were professionally billed as The Merseybeats.  But still fronted by Tony Crane.


  15. 39 minutes ago, ead said:

    Vince Hill?

     

    2 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

    Paper Lace

    Nope, seen ‘em both. And Paper Lace did “Billy Don’t Be A Hero” of course!

    • Thanks 1

  16. Yay! Good luck I’ve got a few lined up and ready to go. Right, get a load of this one! And remember only ONE of these ISN’T true!

    1. Cliff Richard
    2. Paper Lace
    3. Budgie
    4. Vince Hill
    5. Corduroy 
    6. The Merseybeats
    7. Bernie Marsden’s Alaska
    8. Des O’Connor
    9. The Crickets
    10. Roy Castle

     

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