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mr gig

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  1. Now listed on Ebay for all you bargain hunters!
  2. [quote name='Robin' post='68832' date='Oct 2 2007, 08:48 PM']Consider it sold mate. You should have a message with my email address heading your way cause I don't check this site very often. That is assuming of course you still have the rig! Fingers crossed.. [/quote] Now listed on Ebay for all you bargain hunters!
  3. [quote name='mr gig' post='55899' date='Sep 5 2007, 01:02 PM']Hi M8, It was totally untouched by the previous owner, who had the pair from new, and the only thing I've done to it is to increase the mains inlet fuse from 5 amp to 6.3 amps as the previous owner said they failed from time to time. I reckon the amp will draw huge peaks if you play it very loud and the 5amp fuse was marginal. Since then, not a problem at all. All valves are original! I can replace the ECC83s for free if you like and give you the originals. I haven't serviced it. Being an engineer, I use the old saying "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". All a serviceman would do for a basic service is change the valves and clean up the pots and inspect/clean up inside. It has never had a lot of use, judging by the condition of the covering on the amp and cab, so the output valves should be good for ages yet. A preamp valve announces failure very obviously, but they are so cheap they're worth replacing every year or so, hence my offer to change em for you. Mr Gig[/quote] I guess there are no takers then!
  4. [quote name='dub' post='59856' date='Sep 13 2007, 01:22 PM']A good 31band graphic (pref. Klark Teknik) is what you need for monitors. The feedback eliminators can cause a bit of trouble if you leave them on search. You can hear the parametrics shooting around, trying to cut notes that are actually music not feedback! Some engineers method is to insert a graphic on each monitor, leave an open mike (no desk eq) onstage, turn up the poweramp/channel till they feed, then find the offending frequency and reduce it in the graphic then turn up the power amps/mic channel more till the next frequency feeds etc. This is effective but extremely unpleasent to listen to. It is also not possible if the punters are already in the venue unless you want them all to leave! You can find the frequencys and reduce them by the note they relate to on you instrument (440hz is A etc) if you find a chart of the notes this can be really useful as you can identify it quickly and turn it down in the graphic when feedback starts, after a while you'll start to recognise the frequencies. The best basic setup is to get the singer to sing through the monitors on their own (no eq on the desk channel) and eq the graphic till they sounds balanced and as natural as possible (this may not be possible with some singers!)[/quote] I don't know if the other feedback destroyers have this facility, but the new Behringer one I'm using has a freeze facilty. During soundcheck, it notches out all the feedback as you (puposely) wind up the mic levels to very high levels to induce feedback. You then freeze those settings for the gig. It's basically the same as spending ages doing the same thing with a graphic, but it's all done for you - and very quickly! There will probably be some automatic filters left on, but unless someone points a mic into the PA speakers or monitors, you're unlikely to trigger them. You can set the time those auto filters will stay on too, so they will just handle those weird things that vocalists do with mics and then reset themselves. I use a 3.2 kilowatt PA rig and 800 watts of monitors (in fairly small venues sometimes), and those feedback destroyers are great! Mr Gig
  5. [quote name='Gwilym' post='55556' date='Sep 4 2007, 09:39 PM']hi mr gig, i'm assuming you are not going to split this lot? possibly interested in the head on it's own. don't think my back would take the cab... cheers G[/quote] It would be nice to see them stay married to eachother, but a quickie divorce would be ok!
  6. [quote name='stingrayfan' post='57656' date='Sep 9 2007, 10:44 AM']Been having a bit of a problem with our two powered wedges at the last couple of gigs. They're feeding back the minute you turn them up. Taken all the usual precautions like making sure we're behind the main speaker cabs but I can't figure why they feedback so early. We're a three piece who all have mics, and the two powered wedges run off an Aux feed on our mixer. We only run vocals through the mixer. Is there anything else I should be doing? EQ'ing? Positioning? We've tried doing a monitor mix first and it doesn't help. It's mainly the lead singer's wedge that causes the feedback. Tried changing his mic too.[/quote] Hi, You need to position them so the centre of the speaker is pointing straight at your eyes. If they are pointing at your knees, you will never near em, so you'll try to turn them up way too high! I usually put my monitors on a flightcase so they are aimed correctly if there isn't 3 or 4 feet of stage available in front of me to get them aimed correctly. To cure any more problems, the new Behringer FBQ2496 feedback destroyer is excellent. It was £100 from Digital Village. I use one on my main PA and I'm getting another one for the monitor system. You have to learn how to use them, but they work very well indeed. Mr Gig
  7. [quote name='warwickhunt' post='57285' date='Sep 8 2007, 08:23 AM']Unless the physics are different for valve amps (jump in valve experts), in the event of a lead failure to one cab (where you have to outputs going to two separate cabs) there would be no chance of damaging the amp running one 8 ohm cab if the amp were selected to run at 4 ohm. You would have a drop in volume but no damage would ensue. However, that isn't going to happen as we all use quality cables and check them periodically [sound of steps disappearing into the distance and the shuffling of gear as the gig case is retrieved].[/quote] The main liability with valve amps is when the speaker blows open or short circuit (or some idiot disconnects the speaker) when it's being played through. Goodbye output transformer and also usually the output valves very quickly! Very expensive too. In your example above, all should be ok, but not ideal! The usual problem at a gig is that an old jack plug on a speaker lead goes short or open circuit. Again, bye bye valve output transformer/output valves. If your amp and cabs have XLRs for speaker connections, always, always use them. They lock in place and have proper cable clamps to keep the speaker lead fimly in the plug. I hire out a lot of gear from my studios and they all use XLR or Speakon connectors for the speakers. Result = no problems. Mr Gig
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  9. [quote name='BassBalls' post='56747' date='Sep 6 2007, 11:02 PM']Hi, Im new to valve amps and im concerned about the amount of heat im getting from my new Ampeg V4B. It might just be my inexperience but its getting very hot at gigging volume. Even a slight burning smell. Iv checked that the power supply is correct so its not that . I have also cleaned the inside out so i know the dust is not burning. Could i have the impedance switch set to the wrong one? Its currently at 4ohms running two 8ohm cabs in series. Any light that could be shed would be very much appreciated. Cheers[/quote] Big valve amps do get very hot mate. If it's troubling you and the dealer says it's not overheating, get an internal fan fitted like trace Elliot did on the V6 and V8 (two fans in the V8!).
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  11. [quote name='TPJ' post='55723' date='Sep 5 2007, 08:58 AM']Hi, Have you had any issues at all with this amp? Is it all in good working condition, serviced etc...? Cheers,[/quote] Hi M8, It was totally untouched by the previous owner, who had the pair from new, and the only thing I've done to it is to increase the mains inlet fuse from 5 amp to 6.3 amps as the previous owner said they failed from time to time. I reckon the amp will draw huge peaks if you play it very loud and the 5amp fuse was marginal. Since then, not a problem at all. All valves are original! I can replace the ECC83s for free if you like and give you the originals. I haven't serviced it. Being an engineer, I use the old saying "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". All a serviceman would do for a basic service is change the valves and clean up the pots and inspect/clean up inside. It has never had a lot of use, judging by the condition of the covering on the amp and cab, so the output valves should be good for ages yet. A preamp valve announces failure very obviously, but they are so cheap they're worth replacing every year or so, hence my offer to change em for you. Mr Gig
  12. mr gig

    Ashton BV300

    [quote name='andy67' post='55862' date='Sep 5 2007, 12:33 PM']yep! Amazon also do Ampeg at very reasonable prices! Amazon Uk appear to be falling into line with Amazon.com! bang for your buck - apologies for the Americanism!!! Mrgig, you are correct, though some of the newer stuff is looking very sturdy indeed....I have the little brother of your V6 the V4 - these a particulalry bomb proof...however, early models/prototypes were very prown to failure do to over heating... btw, want your v6 swap my american pbass for it?? andy[/quote] If the designers actually design the amp for road use/abuse, then all's well. If they design for cheapest build cost - beware! I don't know if your V4 has a fan in it. That's probably Trace's cure for the overheating. My V6 has one fan and my V8 had two. I miss that V8... Thanks for the offer of a swap. but I need cash to build Studio 3 here (add to my mighty empire - hah!)
  13. mr gig

    Ashton BV300

    [quote name='dood' post='55754' date='Sep 5 2007, 10:03 AM']I saw Ashton gear at the London Guitar Show.. once I managed to take my eyes of the bikini'd lady handing out flyers. Quite a solid looking amp actually. Didn't hear it though. @ Mr Gig.. I'd have to question your point about 'circuit board' designs being prone to failure. I don't think it is that the 'circuit board' designs themselves are at fault.. more over that some companies use cheaper thinner boards with lower quality tracks and mountings. I feel it is this that is more likely to cause problems. There are so many companies that do not 'point-to-point' and have few failures. Take the Trace V-type amps for example. I'd describe those as practically bomb proof. £500 on amazon for a valve amp is certainly a bargain, I'd like to have a play on one![/quote] You're dead right there - thin PCBs are the usual failure cause. A nice thick fibreglass PCB will take all the vibration you can give it! I've got three handwired 60s valve amps, including a Laney Supergroup. You replace the valves and the occasional pot and a valve base once in a while and they just keep going. Over 40 years so far and counting. Those nice thick wires inside the amp just go on and on. Mr Gig
  14. mr gig

    Ashton BV300

    [quote name='andy67' post='55274' date='Sep 4 2007, 02:08 PM']any one got experience of these all valve 300 watt amps? seen them on amazon for £500...all valve? maybe entry level but thats a lot of bang for the proverbial buck!![/quote] For that price, it will be circuit board built. That's ok for home or studio use, but take it on the road and it will be prone to failure. I get quite a few guys with modern Marshall valve amps in my studios and they suffer from unreliablity with them. The older handwired amps seem to go on forever unless you drop em down a flight of stairs. Quality don't come cheap, as they say. Maybe that's why Marshall still make handwired amps, if you can afford them. As well as the sound, they will hang together longer.
  15. [quote name='steve-soar' post='55558' date='Sep 4 2007, 09:43 PM']Yes Sir. How much for the amp?[/quote] To you, ma boy, £800
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