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GuyR

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Posts posted by GuyR


  1. Bass Gallery. As you say, 15% (inc vat) sold four basses in the last 2 years, for a total of £10k. Mainly took a couple of weeks, one a couple of months. One sold for considerably more than I expected. Zero hassle, comms good, funds immediate. 10/10.

    • Like 2

  2. 5 hours ago, tegs07 said:

    I would argue that there is no logic to vintage collectibles unless it’s as an investment. Largely it will be an emotional  rather than a head decision.

    You are right. When the ghastly spectre of logic raises its ugly head in relation to a bass purchase, all chance of a favourable outcome is lost. I bought an all original 62 custom colour jazz bass around 2000/2001 for £3.4k. I have had 20 years wonderful use out of it. I spent an hour playing it this evening. I'd probably not lose money in the unlikely event of selling, although that was absolutely irrelevant to me when I bought and still is. I never think of it as a collectible.

    • Like 1

  3. G

    1 hour ago, tegs07 said:

    I would say the same with wiring.. I would want that replaced on a 50’s car. I’m with you I think it’s ludicrous but It’s what I have heard.. frets may be exempt I don’t know, but pots, jack, wiring are definitely expected to be original.

    As time goes by, it is inevitable that the proportion of vintage instruments with replaced electrical components and frets will increase and that those changes will become more acceptable, as the stock of completely original instruments decreases. There are few Italian vintage violins that have not been substantially repaired, re-necked, fingeboarded, refinished etc. The inevitable repairs are completely acceptable and do not seem to significantly deter buyers. It seems logical to me to anticipate the market for vintage guitars/basses will follow, but who has a crystal ball. Maybe electric guitars/basses will completely fall out of favour. Authentic original instruments have been trading at premium prices since the early 1980s, so the market is well established.

    On another subject,  it does seem a shame to denigrate the choices of others, or assume the motivation of others in making their choices as unsavoury. We are all just bass players making our choices, enjoying our instruments. I'm pleased for anyone, anytime they acquire a bass they enjoy. For me, the very best basses I have played have been vintage.

    • Like 1

  4. 1 hour ago, prowla said:

    It reminds me of the Columbus, which was my first bass.

    Too far and anti-lockdown for me to collect.

    However, I think I have one of those generic Japanese tuners in my parts box, so could contribute that to help get it up and running.

    It's certainly got the look of that era. I'm sure whoever wants it will appreciate the offer.

    As an update, I've plugged it in and it is in full working order, all pots crackle free. It sounded OK.

    • Like 1

  5. I have been given what looks like a 70s No name Jazz type Bass by a friend who does house clearances. It’s fairly horrible. One of the tuners doesn’t work- spins on its shaft, but the neck is playable and overall it seems in ok condition. It is fully functioning, pickups and electrics all good. There is no case.

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    On the basis it won’t immediately appear on gumtree/eBay, anyone who is able to collect it from either Barnet or Kentish Town is very welcome to it.

    • Like 2

  6. On 18 January 2021 at 12:25, drTStingray said:

    Amazing - I've never seen that before.

    His Stingray is a 79 which he bought in Mannys (New York). It appears on most of his work in that era - indeed he still uses it with some of the projects he works on.

    As stated the board has been dealt with numerous times. I wonder whether this was an instance when the board was being fixed and he put a separate neck on - who knows but it's very interesting. 

    He also had at least one additional back up Stingray fretless bass, one of which was fairly recently re-sold. 

    That does look like a Status type neck.

    The back up recently sold, also a '79, was bought in the early 90s for use when his no1 was in for repair. Although it is a great bass, it didn't appear to have been used much. The bass in the video is not the backup.


  7. 3 hours ago, gareth said:

    Wow

    Looks exactly like my bass 

    But my bass only weighs 8lbs 5ozs and the E string definitely ain’t dead

    00D87487-2A6A-484F-8D0F-1DAE56A17CC5.jpeg

    in common with every category of instrument, Vintage Fenders are not all created equal.

    • Like 1

  8. 2 minutes ago, greavesbass said:

    Id lusted for years to get a early 70's sunburst P. Played it and sold it....heavy and the E string was sooo dead. Now play a VM squire P which I shall never sell.

    bass.JPG

    Thankfully, we will now recognise it next time it is advertised for sale.


  9. 3 minutes ago, weezergeezer said:

    Agree with you there friend..most people would rather spend the money on a new car or holiday..but not everyone has the love of old vintages..

    Thank goodness they don't, otherwise the prices would be even more painful. And give me a worn looking bass every time. There are usually two reasons for a pre cbs Fender to be pristine; either it has a sad story, or it is a dog, of which there are plenty. 

    • Like 3

  10. 55 minutes ago, bakerster135 said:

    It's here https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/806605429912273/

    Looks pretty good from the photos, and £8k's about right atm. Reckon that's a padauk fretboard too which they did on the odd bass then

    That looks as good as any l series I have seen, and the price does not seem excessive, but I’m sure the condition would put me off using it. My crop of pre cbs basses and guitars never see the inside of a case, often being left randomly around the house. That 65 is too clean for serious action.


  11. 52 minutes ago, Reggaebass said:

    Nothing definite yet, I’m looking at jazzes mainly, possibly a 62-66 white and tort with the dot fret markers before they changed to block inlays , I wasn’t really a fan of inlays , but saying that I viewed a 72 and a 74 I quite liked but they turned out to be not all original 🙂

    A decent looking '64 Oly White, tort and white headstock Jazz at ATB currently. Been in stock for a while, I think on commission IIRC from my visit there. Possibly worth a look and perhaps open to offers.

    • Thanks 1

  12. 2 hours ago, Reggaebass said:

    Thanks bakerster, I’d forgotten about new kings road guitars, my friend bought a really nice P from them, and ATB guitars is one I didn’t know  👍

    I have bought well from ATB and found them straightforward. I understand guitaravenue are reputable too, although that is not from personal experience.

    If you have confidence in your own judgement, Gardiner Houlgate have four auctions per year. I have also got excellent value there.

    • Thanks 1

  13. 1 hour ago, KevL said:

    A few people claim the first run 'Fender' branded JVs are a touch better. I've seen a couple of later Squiers that have had less-than-perfect fit and finish details but I think it's a case of taking each one on its own merit, don't generalise. The pickups for your Precisions would have been Japanese and the 82 (Fender) could well have originally been slightly different to your 83 Squier - the retrofitted one could possibly have differed again, there was a fair bit of inconsistency.

    The first run JVs have some minor differences in detail - for instance on the Jazz bass, the Fender logo tortoise scratch plate has one fewer layers of ply than the later version. Not sure if the same is true for other tort plate JVs.

    I can't see any difference in fit and finish on my examples. The 84 is noticeably lighter than the Sen ash 82. I'm not sure what th body wood is on the 84 as it is Oly White. When I bought it I tried every JV Jazz in Denmark St. The one I bought was special, so unsurprisingly it is better than the 82. I have an 84 JV Strat which is also fabulous and extremely light. It so outshone the Fender logo 82 Strat I formerly had (which had a serial numbe about 100 away from my 82 Jazz and was an identical piece of wood) that I sold the early example. 

    In my opinion, the pickups of JVs in general are the weak point. All mine are unchanged, but I don't think they quite do justice to the potential contained in he unamplifed tone.

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