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cab magic


Tjhooker
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Love this kind of thing and good on him.  

 

My conclusion; when listening through laptop speakers there was so little difference as to be immeasurable.  That should tell me lots but I'll need to think it through.  :)  

 

Oh and I will be making a donation... just because.    

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Posted (edited)

He could have saved a lot of time, work and wood by reading a book. Everything he 'discovered' and a lot more has been well known in the professional audio community since the 1950s. For instance: http://cyrille.pinton.free.fr/electroac/lectures_utiles/son/Olson.pdf

 

And while he's identified how some changes in response occur he still doesn't know why.

Edited by Bill Fitzmaurice
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19 minutes ago, Bill Fitzmaurice said:

He could have saved a lot of time, work and wood by reading a book. Everything he 'discovered' and a lot more has been well known in the professional audio community since the 1950s. For instance: http://cyrille.pinton.free.fr/electroac/lectures_utiles/son/Olson.pdf

 

And while he's identified how some changes in response occur he still doesn't know why.

I doubt that a YouTube video of Jim Lill reading a book wood get many views though!

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1 hour ago, Bill Fitzmaurice said:

He could have saved a lot of time, work and wood by reading a book. Everything he 'discovered' and a lot more has been well known in the professional audio community since the 1950s. For instance: http://cyrille.pinton.free.fr/electroac/lectures_utiles/son/Olson.pdf

 

And while he's identified how some changes in response occur he still doesn't know why.

I think the aim of the video was more to be entertaining than to be educational.

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2 hours ago, Bill Fitzmaurice said:

He could have saved a lot of time, work and wood by reading a book. Everything he 'discovered' and a lot more has been well known in the professional audio community since the 1950s. For instance: http://cyrille.pinton.free.fr/electroac/lectures_utiles/son/Olson.pdf

 

And while he's identified how some changes in response occur he still doesn't know why.

Good grief

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Now he's done the work of building the cabs I'd love to see what happens to the sound as the mic goes futher away, and off-axis. In particular I'd like to see the cabs with the multiple speakers at different distances from each other and how that affects the sound when the microphone isn't shoved up to the cone.

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57 minutes ago, Vin Venal said:

I'm surprised. I thought the density and rigidity of the wood would make a lot more difference than it did.

I don't think any of that video applies to bass guitar cabs, hi-fi cabs, PA cabs, studio monitors or most other speaker systems where the cabinet can make an appreciable difference.

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23 minutes ago, chyc said:

Now he's done the work of building the cabs I'd love to see what happens to the sound as the mic goes futher away, and off-axis. In particular I'd like to see the cabs with the multiple speakers at different distances from each other and how that affects the sound when the microphone isn't shoved up to the cone.

All of this is also well known, having been mathematically quantified by 1940. There's even software that will accurately map it out. For instance: https://www.comsol.com/acoustics-module

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10 hours ago, Vin Venal said:

I'm surprised. I thought the density and rigidity of the wood would make a lot more difference than it did.

Afaik density isn't an acoustic quality, more commonly a by product of 'rigidity' aka stiffness.

 

Then you get the foam stuff. I don't know how stiff it is but obviously stiff enough not to affect the tone in a small cab.

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Posted (edited)
On 27/05/2022 at 14:01, Bill Fitzmaurice said:

He could have saved a lot of time, work and wood by reading a book. Everything he 'discovered' and a lot more has been well known in the professional audio community since the 1950s. For instance: http://cyrille.pinton.free.fr/electroac/lectures_utiles/son/Olson.pdf

 

And while he's identified how some changes in response occur he still doesn't know why.

 

Now while we're at it, why don't we just shut down the forum and read some books instead?

 

Actually, why don't we just quit playing bass and read some books about it instead?

 

Hell, why even bother living, there are already plenty of great biographies as it is?

 

Edited by Baloney Balderdash
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Posted (edited)
On 27/05/2022 at 17:22, Bill Fitzmaurice said:

All of this is also well known, having been mathematically quantified by 1940. There's even software that will accurately map it out. For instance: https://www.comsol.com/acoustics-module

You are late to the party buddy, someone already linked that before.

Edited by Baloney Balderdash
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