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"Auditioning" for an Originals band


Nicko

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Having re-watched the Dream Theater drummer audition several days ago, I’d say make the band feel comfortable and at home by doing it exactly like it was. you can always suggest some improvements if needed afterwards. 

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Yep, prove you can match the last guy, show that you have showed them due respect and spent the time learning the material as it is and, only then, go and show how much more wonderful you are. Whenever I have auditioned anyone, the #1 peeve is someone who has made a half-assed effort to learn the songs and thinks they can wing it. Prove you can nail it as they presented it to you and you'll go a long way towards getting the gig. You'll have lots of time to express yourself afterwards.

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Really the OP needs to ask the band what they expect. A lot depends what level they are at and how good the OP is. i

 

If it is just a "for fun" band and they're not gigging or planning to release anything, then they probably want someone to keep the band going and he could just learn the stuff they give him and then see how it goes... 

Edited by peteb
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8 hours ago, Nicko said:

I'm done with the endless cycle of enthusiasm and disappointment followed by breakup of pub covers bands and have been in contact with an originals group.

Good luck…. My covers band has wound down post-COVID and originals band sounds like a good path👍

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19 hours ago, Nicko said:

I'm done with the endless cycle of enthusiasm and disappointment followed by breakup of pub covers bands and have been in contact with an originals group.  I'm meeting them in a few weeks and they've sent me a few recordings of rehearsals.

 

I've learnt the basics of the songs but really don't know whether to try to learn the basslines note for note as played by their previous player or show a bit of creativity.  Whatdya think?

 

Play as written for the audition, it proves you can learn the parts. If you get the gig you could then discuss playing what you feel makes it better. When it comes to new songs then its down to you.

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In 31yrs of playing original band stuff, I'm yet to fail an audition. Certainly get in the right area with the part, as a minimum capture the essence of what was originally played. But often overlooked is showing up on time, being amenable, seeming keen and just generally coming across like someone they'd want to be in a band with - it all really goes a long way.

 

Good luck with the audition.  

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11 hours ago, chris_b said:

So it's OK for he rest of the guys to be in an originals band, writing their own lines, but the bass player has to be in a covers band, by only playing lines as written!!!!

I don't think that's what the spirit of what people are saying is. 

 

Once you are in the band and writing material of course I would expect to write my own parts and contribute to the song as a whole. However when joining an established band I wouldn't want to go in and change already written parts, especially not at an audition. 

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I got an audition for an originals band.

 

Spent the week learning the basslines for four recordings (Including a Country Chart number 1) note perfect.

 

Then cancelled at last minute for 'family reasons'.

 

Weeks later got the 'we found someone already' message  😒

 

But, to be honest, I think it's important to learn the originals, especially if the songs have been recorded. This is what I did when I joined an originals band in about '93. The payback was creative freedom after that point.

 

Exception might be genres (like blues rock) where a bass player is expected to use a fair bit of improvisation/creativity live.

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23 hours ago, Waddo Soqable said:

I'd learn them as they are, but keep in reserve some other ideas to bring out if you think it appropriate...

They'd probably be impressed if you could just play their stuff straight off as it is, they might think "smart @rse" if you fiddle about with the bass parts too much to start with, it's very much a suss them out as you go really.

 

I agree. Learn them as-is, and then if you get the job ask if they'd mind you tweaking them a bit or if they'd prefer them left alone. Good luck with the audition! What's the genre?

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When I was a youth the way to get into a band was to turn up with beers and start rolling fat ones. As soon as everybody was suitably refreshed you'd get going with a make-it-up-as-you-go-along jam session, each groove lasting a minimum of 25 minutes. 

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If I were auditioning for an originals band it’s play what is written to get the job.


What happens afterwards in regards to existing material is down to discussion if warranted.

 

What happens when writing new material for the band re the bass, well that’s my job though am always open to creative input, I’m not too old to learn.

 

But to get the job, play what’s been given. A big indicator of if someone can fit in in my opinion, starting off by refusing to play established lines when capable of doing so wouldn’t endear someone to me. I’d just think bother on the way every day.

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I dread to think how I’d do at an audition, I hate the entire process.

 

We’ve had a rubbish run of luck with the band since we did a nice little EP. Predominately guitarists.

 

Prior to that was drummers.

 

Then singers.

 

Then returning singers and guitarists.

 

Then guitarists again as of 5pm and until 6.30pm last night - long story.

 

I should go put as a solo act called “Triggers broom and the revolving door”

 

I freely admit I am the only member of the band who hasn’t left or been told to leave which means I’m definitely the issue 😂

 

But I’ve never auditioned - was debating recently.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Nicko said:

Aren't all chaps assless?  The trick is to wear them with nowt underneath.

A chapless donkey is a blessing - if you’re unfortunate enough to have a chapped donkey…try this…

F9A3368E-6AB9-4575-9444-85030D63F0E9.jpeg

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I'd mostly agree with the above advice - learn the original parts and mostly stick to them.

 

I went through a similar experience several years ago - I did make some tasteful tweaks in appropriate places (well that was the intention!). The original guy's parts were a wee bit dull, mostly just mirroring the rhythm guitar - which is fine in many bands, but I like to try and be a little more melodic. I got away with it and got some compliments. Though, I think that doing such things sparingly is important - little hints of what you could bring to the table and make the band better.

 

George

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Sorry for nonsense above from me.

 

serious post…

 

in 2007 I was sent a batch of demos for a singer guy I’d been recommended to.

 

I played roughly root note stuff with a bit of movement, nothing flashy - and to the song, he never told me to play less, occasionally asked me to play more and that’s how it stayed for 2 albums and a few hundred gigs over about 6 years.

 

I eventually quit due the commitment and family stuff I had going on - the guy who they took on bought all of the pedals I used to use, and played slightly straighter versions of my basslines (from what I’d been told) - his stuff on subsequent recordings had his own style and he sounded great.

 

Just play what’s right for you and the song, I’d probably go in and make a holy show of myself these days as I’m nowhere near as cool as I once thought I was 😆

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3 minutes ago, AndyTravis said:

Sorry for nonsense above from me.

 

serious post…

 

in 2007 I was sent a batch of demos for a singer guy I’d been recommended to.

 

I played roughly root note stuff with a bit of movement, nothing flashy - and to the song, he never told me to play less, occasionally asked me to play more and that’s how it stayed for 2 albums and a few hundred gigs over about 6 years.

 

I eventually quit due the commitment and family stuff I had going on - the guy who they took on bought all of the pedals I used to use, and played slightly straighter versions of my basslines (from what I’d been told) - his stuff on subsequent recordings had his own style and he sounded great.

 

Just play what’s right for you and the song, I’d probably go in and make a holy show of myself these days as I’m nowhere near as cool as I once thought I was 😆

You know that this is BC right? We thrive on nonsense. I look forward to the latest update in your band’s audition thread.

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23 minutes ago, ezbass said:

You know that this is BC right? We thrive on nonsense. I look forward to the latest update in your band’s audition thread.


have you seen yesterday’s update?

 

Original Guitarist quit at 5.30 after 3/4 rehearsals back.

 

His replacement (who i’d wanted to keep…) Came down on 2 hours notice and absolutely smashed it - So he’s back, and original guy can’t come back now. He’s gone.

 

There’s more to it than that. But this isn’t the place for it.

 

To the OP - best of luck, go for it!

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